What every woman should know about CPCs (in handy cartoon form)

Check out this awesome graphic report on crisis pregnancy centers by Susie Cagle. Her description? “Fertile-looking lay person + pregnancy tests + Bush-era abstinence brochures + comfy chairs + lots of calendars +ultrasound machine + nurse = CPC!”

What Every Woman Should Know

Cagle went undercover at one CPC in San Francisco, First Resort, to get a first-hand taste of how they use “kindness, comfort, and misinformation” to push their anti-choice agenda. Happily, San Francisco is pushing for a bill to require truth-in-advertising from CPCs in the city.

But, as the battle over similar laws in New York City and Baltimore continues in the courts, raising public awareness of CPCs is just as important. As organizations that fundamentally rely on deception to get women in the door, CPCs may find their waiting rooms pretty empty if everyone gets hip to their tricks.

So go read Cagle’s report and spread the word.

Related:
Breaking: New York City Council Passes Anti-CPC Legislation!
Deceptive Crisis Pregnancy Centers on Trial in NYC
What I am looking out for in tonight’s premiere in 12th and Delaware.
Baltimore Archdiocese sues over ban on false advertising for crisis pregnancy centers
New bill requires Baltimore CPCs to post signage about lack of abortion information
A Look at Crisis Pregnancy Centers

Atlanta, GA

Maya Dusenbery is an Executive Director in charge of Editorial at Feministing. Maya has previously worked at NARAL Pro-Choice New York and the National Institute for Reproductive Health and was a fellow at Mother Jones magazine. She graduated with a B.A. from Carleton College in 2008. A Minnesota native, she currently lives, writes, edits, and bakes bread in Atlanta, Georgia.

Maya Dusenbery is an Executive Director of Feministing in charge of Editorial.

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  • http://feministing.com/members/screamapiller/ Alex

    What exactly does “fertile-looking” mean? Young? Ovulating?

    I’m fertile a lot of the time and I’d hope no one would ever use that to describe me in my chosen professional setting, regardless of how right or wrong my motivations for my work are.