Weekly Feminist Reader

Gael García-Bernal Feminista

“Hey beautiful. Let’s not let the gender binary define us.” Gael García-Bernal Feminista inspired by Feminist Ryan Gosling. Keep ‘em coming, folks!

Laura Flanders on why immigration is a feminist issue.

“For women, the connection between desire, pain, and death is all too real.” Lynn Parramore looks at the role of female sexuality in “Melancholia,” “Breaking Dawn,” and “A Dangerous Method.

Again, men don’t actually think about sex all day long–sometime their minds turn to food and sleep.

WTF of the week: A study finds that people can’t distinguish between the descriptions of women written in men’s magazines and the ones written by convicted rapists.

Some appropriately outraged reactions to Obama’s paternalistic defense of the Plan B decision from Rebecca Traister, Emily Douglas, Melissa McEwan and Kate Stewart.

The Rumpus imagines some scenes from realistic rom-coms.

Moya of the Crunk Feminist Collective wrote an open letter to the Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl after a recent episode included a transphobic slur. The creators of the show responded to the criticism. Andrea at Racialicious finds the apology lacking.

Via Cara, a campaign that lets you send a holiday card to an incarcerated survivor of sexual abuse.

Teacher and porn actor Conner Habib asks why, exactly, Kevin Hogan was suspended from his teaching job for his past as a porn start.

This week at the Pursuit of Harpyness, Marie Anelle live-blogged her experience having a medical abortion.

Almost half of transgender Latinos have attempted suicide.

Siri’s gender problem is a reminder that there’s still a big gender gap in the tech world.

IMO, we don’t talk nearly enough about how much we love “Parks and Recreation,” but we all do, right?

The New York Times looks at the battle to offer restitution to victims of North Carolina’s forced sterilization program.

What have you been reading/writing/watching/learning this week?

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11 Comments

  1. Posted December 11, 2011 at 12:40 pm | Permalink

    Hiding: Then and Hiding: Now, my experiences of exercising in public (and feeling like I couldn’t exercise in public) while fat.

    Dear PA Liquor Control Board: Fixed That [TW sexual assault, victim blaming] — I was angry about the ad and about the board’s inability to understand why it was victim blaming (at least when I contacted them). So I made an ad of my own.

    And some thoughts on attachment and aversion as they apply to dealing with chronic pain.

    • Posted December 12, 2011 at 5:15 am | Permalink

      I was so mad when I opened my email and received the non-apology apology from the PA Liquor Control Boar. They basically used the, “It wasn’t my intention!” excuse for victim-blaming. I’m so done with people using their good intentions to justify hurting people. Thanks for your alternative poster, Tori, I think that’s a pretty great visual representation comparing the two messages and demonstrating why the liquor control board’s is wrong.

      I’ve been writing in my personal blog usually about sexism I’ve experienced while working as a sailor on traditionally-rigged ships, but tonight I felt like venting about growing up thin, the way people treat you when you are thin, and how being thin didn’t equate to freedom from body image issues and internalized sexism. It also briefly addresses my habit of looking to men for validation and having to overcome denial about sexism in people I want to like. Trigger warning for discussion of weight-issues/ eating disorders. http://holdingfaster.wordpress.com/2011/12/12/not-so-shiny/

  2. Posted December 11, 2011 at 7:38 pm | Permalink

    Today… http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/family/articles/2011/12/11/led_by_the_child_who_simply_knew/?p1=News_links

    We’ve a long way to go, but for this 57 year old, we’ve come far in a decade.

  3. Posted December 12, 2011 at 1:15 am | Permalink

    ”men don’t actually think about sex all day long–sometime their minds turn to food and sleep.”

    Little bits of petty sexism like this are not advancing the feminist cause. The study finding was that food and sleep-related thoughts were roughly equal in frequency to sex-related thoughts, NOT that men’s thoughts overall are dominated by those three topics, to the exclusion of others.

    • Posted December 12, 2011 at 1:04 pm | Permalink

      I thought that was sarcastic. Maybe I’m wrong, but that’s just what I thought they were going for.

      • Posted December 13, 2011 at 10:29 am | Permalink

        Usually “you shouldn’t be offended by this sexism because it was a joke” isn’t a statement we like around here, I thought.

  4. Posted December 12, 2011 at 11:19 am | Permalink

    Hypatia and the history of misogyny: portrait of the astronomer as a naked blonde.

    CGI bodies are a symptom of the sickness, not the cause

    Online threats, stupid hostile comments, and how free speech and censorship do not mean what misogynists think they mean.

    My own private zombapocalypse, “Oomblaug Day”. How I illustrated the crappiness of the world without using or knowing the terminology I know today.

  5. Posted December 12, 2011 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

    I read a very upsetting story about two men in a Dallas barbershop who forcibly manhandled, shaved the head of, and physically assaulted a homeless woman. They posted a video on YouTube. Police and homeless advocates are trying to locate the woman to help her.

    http://www.the33tv.com/news/kdaf-video-of-homeless-dallas-woman-humilated-sparks-outrage-20111207,0,1509364.story

  6. Posted December 12, 2011 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

    Parks & Rec is like the best show on T.V.-Go Feminists!

  7. Posted December 13, 2011 at 8:40 am | Permalink

    I keep thinking about Obama’s paternalistic approach to the Plan B med and how different men take having daughters and use it to form their opinions on different women’s issues. Take my dad, the father of four girls. He has told me that we reaffirmed his belief in women’s reproductive choices. Like Obama, my dad knows that should the worst happen, we would probably be okay. We are affluent enough that money would not be too much of an issue. We are healthy. We have supportive parents. We are also white (which helps should we choose adoption).

    But my father took that protective feeling towards us and saw that some girls, hell most girls, aren’t that lucky. So while he’d give anything to keep us safe, some girls don’t have that. And for that reason, he is supportive of women’s rights.*

    *I should mention that he supported them before we were born as well. Also, as a doctor, he tends to follow the science approach. As the husband of a doctor who did her OB residency in a poor inner-city hospital, he also knows very well the conditions in which a girl should not be having a baby, but is. Both of my parents are big supporters of women’s rights. And they both were in med school when Roe v. Wade was decided and saw the positive consequences of that. As my mother told me when I was maybe eleven, “if for no other reason, abortion needs to be legal because keeping it legal is the only way to keep it safe.”

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