Posts Tagged Writers

What do the numbers say? VIDA’s annual count of the gender gap in publishing

In 2011, one of my classmates from Sarah Lawrence penned an open letter to The New Yorker, blasting them for their then abysmal record of publishing women’s voices. She shared her letter on our closed email listserv and received curious pushback from some of my male classmates. When I say curious pushback, it was more like: “it’s really hard to get published…” or “there are bigger concerns like the economy tanking…” or “the prison industrial complex is growing more powerful by the day…” or “what about black on black crime” (I kid on that last one, but not really). Which is to say: why should we spend our energy caring about something as frivolous as publishing an equal ...

In 2011, one of my classmates from Sarah Lawrence penned an open letter to The New Yorker, blasting them for their then abysmal record of publishing women’s voices. She shared her letter on our closed ...

Welcome Katherine!

I am beyond excited to welcome Katherine Cross as our newest guest writer. I’ve been a fan of Katherine’s nerdy brilliance for a while. She’s had writing at Feministing before, but now she’ll be joining us on a more regular basis. Here’s some more info about her:

Katherine Cross is a pizza loving feminist sociologist, trans Latina, and amateur slug herder, working on her PhD at the CUNY Graduate Centre. When she’s not studying or gaming she can be found at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. Her blog can be found at quinnae.com and her writing has also appeared in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Bitch Magazine, Questioning Transphobia, and Kotaku. She is a co-editor of the Border House.

Please join me and ...

I am beyond excited to welcome Katherine Cross as our newest guest writer. I’ve been a fan of Katherine’s nerdy brilliance for a while. She’s had writing at Feministing before, but now she’ll be joining us ...

Quote of the Day: “People only say I’m angry because I’m black and I’m a woman.”

Novelist Jamaica Kincaid offers some #realtalk in response to a question about the role of anger and humor in her writing in a recent interview at The American Reader.

People only say I’m angry because I’m black and I’m a woman. But all sorts of people write with strong feeling, the way I do. But if they’re white, they won’t say it. I used to just pretend I didn’t notice it, and now I just think I don’t care.

There are all sorts of reasons not to like my writing. But that’s not one of them. Saying something is angry is not a criticism. It’s not valid. It’s not a valid observation in terms of criticism. You can list ...

Novelist Jamaica Kincaid offers some #realtalk in response to a question about the role of anger and humor in her writing in a recent interview at The American Reader.

People only say I’m angry because ...

Quick hit: 90 Days, 90 Reasons

You know it’s getting really mcreally real out there in this election season when writers I know and love get to organizing websites and breaking down policy points on why Obama is good for women (and all of us).

Here’s George Saunders:

Think about that for a second: Obama is saying that a gay woman who gets abused, raped, or assaulted is as worthy of help as a straight woman; that a woman of American Indian descent who gets abused, raped, or assaulted is as worthy of help as a white woman; that a woman who happens to be a student and is abused is as worthy of help as a woman who is not a student; that a woman who ...

You know it’s getting really mcreally real out there in this election season when writers I know and love get to organizing websites and breaking down policy points on why Obama is good for women (and all ...

Publishing’s perpetual problem with women among many other things.

In the wake of the Jonah Lehrer controversy, Roxanne Gay wonders if  the publishing industry coddles young male writers and unpacks the fascination with our boy genius narrative:

Lehrer’s success and this current humiliation, how far he had to fall, is a symptom of a much bigger problem, one that is systemic, one that continues to consistently elevate certain kinds of men simply for being a certain kind of man. Jonah Lehrer fits the narrative we want about a boy genius. He is young, attractive and well educated. He can write a good sentence. He can parse complicated science for the masses and make us feel smarter for finally being able to understand the complexities of the human mind. He is ...

In the wake of the Jonah Lehrer controversy, Roxanne Gay wonders if  the publishing industry coddles young male writers and unpacks the fascination with our boy genius narrative:

Lehrer’s success and this current humiliation, how far he had ...

Feminist author Jill Johnston Dies at 81

Feminist author, columnist for the Village Voice, author of multiple books including Lesbian Nation: The Feminist Solution and one of the first out lesbians in the mainstream media passed away this last weekend.

The Vancouver Observer writes about her playfully in a lovely obituary,

Thespian lemonist, dance cricket, and irrepressible funster, Jill Johnston seemed to be everywhere in the 1970s—in the Village Voice, on the Dick Cavett Show, in Time magazine. And then she wasn’t. And then she appeared again in a conversation with the sound poet Anne Witten in 1985 on an island off the coast of Maine.

Feisty, irreverent, difficult, incomprehensible, surreal, as one critic put it, she was “part Gertrude Stein, part E. E. Cummings, with ...

Feminist author, columnist for the Village Voice, author of multiple books including Lesbian Nation: The Feminist Solution and one of the first out lesbians in the mainstream media passed away this last weekend.

The Vancouver ...

The Plight of the Woman Writer

Erin Belieu, of Vida: Women in Literary Arts, posted a really revealing article last week over at XX factor about the plight of women writers—and the news is not good. It’s the kind of info that would prompt any woman pursuing an English writing major to check out her dual degree options. The article dons stats that expose New Republic for publishing a scant 32 women, compared to 160 men,  when considering book reviews, poetry and non-fiction that was featured between February and September of this year. But here is the real coup de grace:

The numbers generally indicate that if you’re a writer who happens to be a woman in any genre, you’d better be ready to spend ...

Erin Belieu, of Vida: Women in Literary Arts, posted a really revealing article last week over at XX factor about the plight of women writers—and the news is not good. It’s the kind of info ...