Posts Tagged The Academic Feminist

The Academic Feminist: Student Series, Part II with Peter Rydzewski

Welcome back, Academic Feminists, to the second in our series of interviews with students about their college theses or final projects. Today’s column features the work of Peter Rydzewski. A recent graduate of The College at Brockport, SUNY, Peter will be attending a PhD Program in Sociology at the University of Maryland beginning in the fall. He is broadly interested in studying patterns of inequality that are negotiated between the workplace and home, primarily those rooted in discussions of gender and sexuality.

Welcome back, Academic Feminists, to the second in our series of interviews with students about their college theses or final projects. Today’s column features the work of Peter Rydzewski. A recent graduate ...

The Academic Feminist Presents: Marisa Irabli and Feministing’s Student Series!

Here at Feministing, two of our great loves are academic feminism and young feminists. Now we’re bringing the two together: today’s Academic Feminist column kicks off a series of interviews with students about their college theses or final projects that explore topics related to gender and sexuality. The first interview in our series comes from Marisa Irabli.

Marisa Irabli is a recent Rutgers University and Douglass Residential College graduate (May 2014), having received a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, with additional concentrations in Women’s and Gender Studies and Women’s Leadership. She is currently pursuing a Master of Arts/Certificate of Advanced Study in School Psychology at Alfred University.

Here at Feministing, two of our great loves are academic feminism and young feminists. Now we’re bringing the two together: today’s Academic Feminist column kicks off a series of interviews with students about their ...

The Academic Feminist: Lady Economists in Conversation

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! Today I am excited to present a conversation with Kate Bahn and Katherine Moos, PhD Candidates in the Economics Department at the New School for Social Research and founders of the blog, Lady Economist, where they have weighed in on everything from the gender pay gap to the European economic crisis. Here, I asked Kate and Katherine to explain how economics can be “feminist” and to offer their thoughts on what the much-discussed (and best-selling) book on economic inequality, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, means for feminism.

I love the name of your blog! Can you tell us about how it came to be?

KM: Why thank you! The name “Lady Economist” ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! Today I am excited to present a conversation with Kate Bahn and Katherine Moos, PhD Candidates in the Economics Department at the New School for Social Research and founders of the ...

The Academic Feminist: Leah DeVun on feminist art and womyn’s lands

Welcome back, Academic Feminists. This edition features an interview with artist and historian Leah DeVun. Leah lives in New York and teaches women’s and gender history at Rutgers University. Her artwork has been featured in Artforum, Capricious, and LA Weekly and her scholarly work has appeared in Radical History Review and GLQ. “The L Word” fans may recognize her from her work as a commentator on the DVD of the Showtime series. Here, Leah discusses the connections between her scholarly work and her art, for example, by looking at the history of the womyn’s land movement and asking what it can tell us about current efforts to imagine communal ways of living. Leah concludes by discussing the legacy ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists. This edition features an interview with artist and historian Leah DeVun. Leah lives in New York and teaches women’s and gender history at Rutgers University. Her artwork has been featured in ...

The Academic Feminist: Cheryl Clarke on Black Queer Trouble, Past and Present

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! In a departure from our usual format – featuring the work of early career scholars – this edition of the AF features one of the foremost scholars, poets, and “troublemakers” of our time, Cheryl Clarke. Clarke is the author of four books of poetry, Narratives: poems in the tradition of black women (1982), Living as a Lesbian (1986), Humid Pitch (1989), Experimental Love (1993), the critical study, After Mecca: Women Poets and the Black Arts Movement (Rutgers Press, 2005), and The Days of Good Looks: Prose and Poetry 1980-2005 (Carroll and Graf, 2006). She recently retired from Rutgers University-New Brunswick, and is currently raising money for the Festival of Women Writers in Hobart, New ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! In a departure from our usual format – featuring the work of early career scholars – this edition of the AF features one of the foremost scholars, poets, and “troublemakers” of our ...

The Academic Feminist: Melanie Klein on Yoga and Feminism

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! As an academic feminist and long-time yoga practitioner, I’ve always been fascinated by the connections between yoga and feminism. When a piece published last month on xoJane set off a firestorm surrounding issues of race, gender, and neo-colonialism in Western yoga classrooms, it became clearer than ever that having conversations about these connections is extremely important. Today’s interviewee, Melanie Klein has written extensively on these issues, including in the forthcoming book Yoga + Body Image, which she co-edited. Klein is a writer, speaker and Associate Faculty member at Santa Monica College, where she teaches Sociology and Women’s Studies. You can learn more about her work on Twitter – @feministfatale and @YogaBodyImage ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! As an academic feminist and long-time yoga practitioner, I’ve always been fascinated by the connections between yoga and feminism. When a piece published last month on xoJane set off a firestorm surrounding ...

The Academic Feminist: Finding Queer Feminist Community in Academia

Welcome back, Academic Feminists, I hope that your new year/new semester is off to a good start. Today’s column features a dialogue between John Jay College of Criminal Justice colleagues Marcie Bianco and Victoria Bond. Marcie Bianco, Queer Public(s) Intellectual, PhD, is a columnist and contributing writer at AfterEllen and Lambda Literary, as well as an adjunct associate professor at John Jay College at Hunter College. Victoria Bond is the co-author of Zora and Me and a lecturer at John Jay College. The two caught my eye when they teamed up on  AfterEllen to discuss Beyoncé’s latest album, which they analyzed using Audre Lorde’s “The Uses of Erotic” (!!). Their conversation today touches on everything ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists, I hope that your new year/new semester is off to a good start. Today’s column features a dialogue between John Jay College of Criminal Justice colleagues Marcie Bianco and Victoria Bond.

The Academic Feminist: NWSA Annual Conference Report Back

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! This month I’m taking a break from interviewing to provide you with a glimpse inside my pilgrimage to the academic feminist mecca: the annual NWSA conference!

Whether you came to feminism through a gender studies class or not, many of you will appreciate the “special relationship” between feminist activist/online work and WGSS (women’s, gender, and sexuality studies) programs. In this age of digital organizing and social networking, these connections are even stronger, and the NWSA conference is an excellent chance to get to hear – and meet – some of the feminists you admire online/in books IRL. Some of my personal IRL highlights at this year’s conference in Cincinnati, Ohio, included: meeting my UVenus colleague ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists! This month I’m taking a break from interviewing to provide you with a glimpse inside my pilgrimage to the academic feminist mecca: the annual NWSA conference!

Whether you came to feminism through ...

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