Posts Tagged publishing

bodymap

Feminsting Reads: Bodymap by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Lambda Literary Award-winning writer Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha’s Bodymap, published this summer by Mawenzi House, returns often to the word “home.” Home is a meeting of body and map,
tattooed on Piepzna-Samarasinha’s breastplate and charted throughout the work in sensory memories, corporeal trauma, physical pleasures. 

Lambda Literary Award-winning writer Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha’s Bodymap, published this summer by Mawenzi House, returns often to the word “home.” Home is a meeting of body and map,
tattooed on Piepzna-Samarasinha’s breastplate and charted throughout the work in ...

Pulitzer Prize

Chart of the Day: Novels about men are more likely to win major literary awards

According to an analysis by author Nicola Griffith, women are more likely to win literary awards for fiction when their protagonist is a man. The more prestigious the award, the less likely the subject will be a woman.

According to an analysis by author Nicola Griffith, women are more likely to win literary awards for fiction when their protagonist is a man. The more prestigious the award, the less likely the subject will ...

What do the numbers say? VIDA’s annual count of the gender gap in publishing

In 2011, one of my classmates from Sarah Lawrence penned an open letter to The New Yorker, blasting them for their then abysmal record of publishing women’s voices. She shared her letter on our closed email listserv and received curious pushback from some of my male classmates. When I say curious pushback, it was more like: “it’s really hard to get published…” or “there are bigger concerns like the economy tanking…” or “the prison industrial complex is growing more powerful by the day…” or “what about black on black crime” (I kid on that last one, but not really). Which is to say: why should we spend our energy caring about something as frivolous as publishing an equal ...

In 2011, one of my classmates from Sarah Lawrence penned an open letter to The New Yorker, blasting them for their then abysmal record of publishing women’s voices. She shared her letter on our closed ...

Port magazine cover saying "A New Golden Age" with photo of six white male editors

Magazine cover featuring six old white dude-itors prompts #WomenEdsWeLove

The new golden age of magazine publishing is pretty pale, male, and stale, according to this Port cover. Granted the magazine business is still pretty male-dominated and granted the British quarterly is a men’s magazine and granted who had even heard of it before this cover? Not me. But as others have noted, there are, in fact, quite a few women leading major magazines. (And, as Ruth Franklin points out, that’s not to mention the many female editors, writers, and fact-checkers to which the publications highlighted by Port owe their success.)

So in response, writer and editor Amy Wallace started the #WomenEditorsWeLove hashtag on Twitter yesterday. Check it out and add your favorites!

The new golden age of magazine publishing is pretty pale, male, and stale, according to this Port cover. Granted the magazine business is still pretty male-dominated and granted the British quarterly is a men’s magazine ...

Publishing’s perpetual problem with women among many other things.

In the wake of the Jonah Lehrer controversy, Roxanne Gay wonders if  the publishing industry coddles young male writers and unpacks the fascination with our boy genius narrative:

Lehrer’s success and this current humiliation, how far he had to fall, is a symptom of a much bigger problem, one that is systemic, one that continues to consistently elevate certain kinds of men simply for being a certain kind of man. Jonah Lehrer fits the narrative we want about a boy genius. He is young, attractive and well educated. He can write a good sentence. He can parse complicated science for the masses and make us feel smarter for finally being able to understand the complexities of the human mind. He is ...

In the wake of the Jonah Lehrer controversy, Roxanne Gay wonders if  the publishing industry coddles young male writers and unpacks the fascination with our boy genius narrative:

Lehrer’s success and this current humiliation, how far he had ...