Posts Tagged intimate partner violence

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A tipping point on gender-based violence in South Africa?

A number of recent articles have suggested that February 2013 will go down in history as the month when South Africa finally began an earnest fight against epidemic intimate partner and gender-based violence. Femicide is no rare occurrence in the country, but in the last three weeks two particularly brutal, high-profile murders have captured media attention and galvanized activists.

The two late victims, Reeva Steenkamp and Anene Booysen, represent two very different parts of South African society: Steenkamp was a white model and law school graduate famously attached to a beloved Olympic athlete; 17-year-old Booysen was black, and few had heard her name while she was still alive.

The proximity of their murders—Steenkamp posted a ...

A number of recent articles have suggested that February 2013 will go down in history as the month when South Africa finally began an earnest fight against epidemic intimate partner and ...

Prudence, dear

Dear Prudence: How should I respond to your rape denialism?

*Trigger warning*

Dear Prudence,

I have this problem I’m hoping you can help me with. I’m a 22-year-old feminist blogger and sometimes I read this Slate advice column by Emily Yoffe—you, actually—who just wrote yet another column dismissing a woman’s alleged rape because of her drinking. What should I do?

Last week, you published a letter from a young woman whose roommate was “very upset” upon waking up, after a night out drinking, with one of the writer’s coworkers and no memory of the encounter. The friend seeking your advice seems skeptical and unsupportive; given her relationship with both parties, she would find herself in a much more comfortable position if the whole ...

*Trigger warning*

Dear Prudence,

I have this problem I’m hoping you can help me with. I’m a 22-year-old feminist blogger and sometimes I read this Slate advice column by Emily Yoffe—you, actually—who ...

Quick Hit: The NYT on restorative justice

Paul Tullis has a haunting piece in the New York Times on the role of forgiveness in the criminal justice system–explored through the aftermath of a devastating murder of a young woman, Ann Grosmaire, by her boyfriend Conor McBridge. The long article is a really tough read, but I appreciate that Tullis explores restorative justice through the response to an unquestionably terrible crime; too often, I fear, alternatives to traditional carceral approaches are discussed only for minor offenses like drug use and petty theft, which allows everyone, from defenders of the prison system to abolitionists, to avoid the hardest questions.

The details of the Ann’s killer’s sentencing process and punishment will likely only satisfy moderate reformers, but testimonies from the Grosmaire ...

Paul Tullis has a haunting piece in the New York Times on the role of forgiveness in the criminal justice system–explored through the aftermath of a devastating murder of a young woman, Ann Grosmaire, by her boyfriend ...

Youth dating violence impacting even younger teens

Over a decade ago we learned it was young people (age 16-24) that endured the highest rates of dating violence which catapulted a variety of programs in an effort to decrease the disastrous rates with which young people were experiencing intimate partner violence. Ten years later it appears little has changed. The Center for Disease Control found that today 1 in 10 teenagers still experience dating violence. And some research suggests that teens as young as 11 and 12 have experienced dating violence.

According to the New York Times, this new data has caused many intervention programs to target even younger youth–educating those as young as 11 about the impacts of teen dating violence.

Esta Soler, president of Futures Without Violence, a ...

Over a decade ago we learned it was young people (age 16-24) that endured the highest rates of dating violence which catapulted a variety of programs in an effort to decrease the disastrous rates with which young people were ...

How do “Stand Your Ground” laws apply to victims of domestic violence?

Over on her new website, CNN HLN anchor Richelle Carey asks a very interesting question: Does ‘Stand Your Ground’ apply to domestic abuse?

The ‘Stand Your Ground’ laws that have become well-known in the wake of the killing of Trayvon Martin.  The laws are supposed to allow an individual to use lethal force if they reasonably believe they are in imminent harm. So what about victims of domestic abuse?  On August 1, 2010, Marissa Alexander, a 31 year old Florida mother of 3 is about to be sentenced for aggravated assault after firing a warning shot at her husband.  The shot she fired missed him, but the charges stuck.

Alexander’s friends and family claim that if the ‘Stand Your Ground’ law applies in ...

Over on her new website, CNN HLN anchor Richelle Carey asks a very interesting question: Does ‘Stand Your Ground’ apply to domestic abuse?

The ‘Stand Your Ground’ laws that have become well-known in the wake of the ...

Nearly 1 in 5 women in the U.S. has been sexually assaulted

**Trigger warning**

Nearly one in five women in the U.S. has been sexually assaulted. That’s the most headline-grabbing statistic from an important new study released by the CDC yesterday. Based on a nationally representative phone survey, the report offers a comprehensive and depressing look at the epidemic of sexual and domestic violence in this country. Here are some other major takeaways:

Most people are raped* by people they know.

This should be old news by now, but it bears repeating: The myth of the stranger-in-the-alley rape is way off. More than half of female survivors reported being raped by a current or former partner and 40% reported being raped by an acquaintance. Only about 1 in 7 were raped by a ...

**Trigger warning**

Nearly one in five women in the U.S. has been sexually assaulted. That’s the most headline-grabbing statistic from an important new study released by the CDC yesterday. Based on a nationally representative phone survey, the ...

Yep, Topeka, Kansas actually decriminalized domestic violence

As I wrote last week, Topeka, Kansas has been weighing the idea of decriminalizing domestic violence to avoid footing the bill for prosecuting the cases. And last night, despite the protests from advocates and incredulous national headlines, the City Council voted to do just that.

The New York Times reports:

By a vote of 7 to 3, the City Council repealed the local law that makes domestic violence a crime.

The move, the councilors were told, would force District Attorney Chad Taylor to prosecute the cases because they would remain a crime under state law, a conclusion with which he grudgingly agreed. The Council also approved negotiations to resolve the impasse.

Several victims of domestic violence spoke against the proposal at the ...

As I wrote last week, Topeka, Kansas has been weighing the idea of decriminalizing domestic violence to avoid footing the bill for prosecuting the cases. And last night, despite the protests from advocates and incredulous national ...

Topeka, Kansas considers decriminalizing domestic violence to avoid prosecuting cases

Last night, in between approving city expenditures and other routine agenda items, the Topeka, Kansas City Council debated one rather controversial one: decriminalizing domestic violence.

Here’s what happened: Last month, the Shawnee County District Attorney’s office, facing a 10% budget cut, announced that the county would no longer be prosecuting misdemeanors, including domestic violence cases, at the county level. Finding those cases suddenly dumped on the city and lacking resources of their own, the Topeka City Council is now considering repealing the part of the city code that bans domestic battery. The thinking here is that the county won’t let domestic violence go unpunished in Topeka and so will be forced to step in and start prosecuting it again ...

Last night, in between approving city expenditures and other routine agenda items, the Topeka, Kansas City Council debated one rather controversial one: decriminalizing domestic violence.

Here’s what happened: Last month, the Shawnee County District Attorney’s office, ...

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