Posts Tagged Feminism

Intergenerational feminism and the path ahead

“So, what brings you to this luncheon?”

I smile. “I’m a writer with Feministing.com, a blog for young feminists.”

“Oh,” the woman raises her eyebrows. “How interesting! So are you a lawyer?”

I look around at the room full of human rights lawyers and smile again. “No, Feministing is a blog, like a website? Anyways, I’ll be live-tweeting the event today.” The woman gave me a politely confused look.

This was one of many funny learning moments I had at this event organized by Equal Rights Advocates, a national organization fighting for women’s economic and educational access and opportunities. The crowd at the event included a lot of feminists who might still measure the movement in “waves” and plenty who knew very little about the ...

“So, what brings you to this luncheon?”

I smile. “I’m a writer with Feministing.com, a blog for young feminists.”

“Oh,” the woman raises her eyebrows. “How interesting! So are you a lawyer?”

I look around at the room full of ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New Yorker and square Slate reviews, and an article in The Toast on the unsubtle heterosexism of said all male-authored reviews. Even after reading the book twice in private, it was difficult to experience her work separate from its online reception.

Perhaps this is fitting. Lockwood is arguably most well-known for her poem “Rape Joke,” which traveled meme-like across the web last year like no poem ever has, and anticipated its own hype: “The rape joke is if you write a poem called ...

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New ...

The Feministing Five: Stuff Mom Never Told You

 While at a friend’s house one afternoon, I overheard a friend listening to a really fantastic podcast. And I know what you’re thinking. “Not another one of those white dude hosts that tries hard to sound not overly geeky yet kinda cool but actually he’s copying that first dude with the glasses.”

This one featured the voices of two women exploring 19th century feminist history with a special emphasis on politics and race. Unlike most lectures you might find in college, the podcast was engaging, accessible, and impeccably researched. I posted up in the kitchen until its end and then I asked what was the name of the podcast. She said, “Stuff Your Mom ...

 While at a friend’s house one afternoon, I overheard a friend listening to a really fantastic podcast. And I know what you’re thinking. “Not another one of those white dude hosts that tries hard to sound ...

An open letter to privileged people who play devil’s advocate

You know who you are. You are that white guy in an Ethnic Studies class who’s exploring the idea that poor people might have babies to stay on welfare. Or some person arguing over drinks that maybe a lot of women do fake rape for attention. Or, recently, someone insisting that I consider the idea that Elliot Rodger could have been a madman and an anomaly, not at all a product of a white supremacist and misogynistic society.

Most of the time, it’s clear that you actually believe the arguments you claim to have just for the heck of it. However, you know that these beliefs are unpopular, largely because they make you sound selfish and privileged, so you blame them on the ...

You know who you are. You are that white guy in an Ethnic Studies class who’s exploring the idea that poor people might have babies to stay on welfare. Or some person arguing over drinks that maybe ...

The One In Which I Share My Entry Point To Feminist Thought

I want to tell you an old story. During my first year at Columbia, it occurred to me during a brief reverie that something was odd about the literature we were reading and how it represented women. In the margins of my notebook, I began making a branch of every book we read in Literature Humanities (aka Lit Hum), and I noted how each author in the western canon defined women over time– from St. Augustine, Boccaccio, Apuleius, Dante, to Goethe.

I remember some vague controversy my first year among instructors and administration about whether or not A Vindication of The Rights of Women should be mandated in the curriculum’s reading list. I think a mild concession was reached which allowed ...

I want to tell you an old story. During my first year at Columbia, it occurred to me during a brief reverie that something was odd about the literature we were reading and how it represented women. ...

#TransHealthcareNow: Why now is the time for the most vital form of trans inclusion

Conferences tend to be rather staid affairs that are rigidly structured by lovelessly adumbrated agendas. Pre-planned panels and speeches dominate those agendas. Thus, when someone goes off-script somehow, the results are bound to be fascinating.

Last Thursday the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP) in New York City provided a happy off-ramp from the script of HX Refactored, a healthcare conference taking place in Manhattan, when they participated in a direct action on stage to advocate for trans-inclusive Medicaid coverage in New York. A banner was proudly unfurled, speeches were made, and everything flew off script—to the applause of many in the audience, no less, a hopeful sign if ever there was one. The state’s new health commissioner, Howard Zucker, bore ...

Conferences tend to be rather staid affairs that are rigidly structured by lovelessly adumbrated agendas. Pre-planned panels and speeches dominate those agendas. Thus, when someone goes off-script somehow, the results are bound to be fascinating.

Last Thursday the ...

A How to Guide for Male Feminists (with the caveat that I don’t know what I’m talking about)

The weirdest thing that has happened to me in my career as a writer is people asking me to talk. Churches, community groups, schools, organizations, TV/radio, birthday and bachelorette parties. For some reason, people want to hear words come out of my mouth, which makes me a little uneasy, because I became a writer in part so I wouldn’t ever have to talk.

But I do it more and more now, and provided I’ve had a chance to listen to my confidence building soundtrack (it’s Jay Z’s The Blueprint album for those wondering, but you choose whatever makes you feel like a boss), I’m OK speaking to crowds. And they get comfortable enough to ask questions.

I write a lot about ...

The weirdest thing that has happened to me in my career as a writer is people asking me to talk. Churches, community groups, schools, organizations, TV/radio, birthday and bachelorette parties. For some reason, people want to hear ...

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