Posts Tagged Class

New report shows how the “pregnancy penalty” drives economic inequality

A Better Balance, a legal advocacy organization in New York City, has a new report explaining how the “bias and inflexibility towards women in the workplace that starts when they become pregnant and snowballs into lasting economic disadvantages” is driving gender inequality and overall economic inequality in the city:

Despite advances in gender equality over the past 40 years, women continue to jeopardize their livelihoods simply by having children. The pregnancy penalty helps to explain why mothers as a whole continue to earn five to six percent less than non-mothers, and why historically disadvantaged women, single mothers and black women, have seen their wage penalties rise sharply since 1977. In New York City, single, childless women under age ...

A Better Balance, a legal advocacy organization in New York City, has a new report explaining how the “bias and inflexibility towards women in the workplace that starts when they become pregnant and snowballs ...

New Blog Alert: Where feminists talk economics

We’re thrilled to see that The Nation is launching a new roundtable blog called The Curve, “where feminists will hash out economic issues and intervene in feminist debates from an economic perspective.” The editors explain that they’ve been frustrated by two phenomena:

One is the way in which women’s voices are so frequently sidelined in economic debates. Our voices are few and far between in the economics blogosphere. It’s striking that almost none of the reviewers of Thomas Piketty’s groundbreaking Capital in the Twenty-First Centurywere women. And as Media Matters recently showed, women are rarely invited to discuss the economy on cable news.

The flipside of this problem is that, even amongst ourselves, feminists don’t talk enough about economics. Too often, discussions ...

We’re thrilled to see that The Nation is launching a new roundtable blog called The Curve, “where feminists will hash out economic issues and intervene in feminist debates from an economic perspective.” The editors explain that ...

Chart of the Day: Life expectancy for poor US women is declining

According to a new analysis from the Brookings Institute, the life expectancy gap between the rich and the poor in the US is growing, especially among women.

Comparing life expectancy at age 55 between folks born in 1920 vs. 1940 found that men, overall, have gained an additional five years — with the richest men gaining six years and the poorest gaining less than two. On average, women still live longer than men, but their life expectancy has increased by less than one year overall during this time. While the richest women have gained a few years, life expectancy among the poorest 40 percent has actually declined from the previous generation. The WSJ sums it up in the chart above. 

According to a new analysis from the Brookings Institute, the life expectancy gap between the rich and the poor in the US is growing, especially among women.

Comparing life expectancy at age 55 between folks born in 1920 ...

Correction: Sex tapes don’t “work” for working and middle class women

The release of a sex tape featuring Love and Hip Hop Atlanta cast members Mimi Faust and Nikko Smith earlier this week has had the internet (mainly Black Twitter) abuzz. Per usual, everyone has an opinion on what appears to be a cliché publicity stunt.

One take from the blogosphere caught my eye though. In a post on Clutch Magazine with the bold headline “Dear Mimi: Sex Tapes Don’t Work for Black Women,” writer Britni Danielle argues that:

“Although it seems counterintuitive, sex tapes can have a huge upside for marginal celebrities, like Mimi and Niko, catapulting them into the mainstream and introducing them to a whole new audience. But there’s just one problem for Mimi: sex tapes don’t work for Black women.

While several ...

The release of a sex tape featuring Love and Hip Hop Atlanta cast members Mimi Faust and Nikko Smith earlier this week has had the internet (mainly Black Twitter) abuzz. Per usual, everyone has an opinion on what appears to ...

Chart of the Day: Blame US policies, not single mothers, for child poverty

Single mothers in the US are disproportionately likely to be poor — a fact that some like to point to explain why we have such god awful rates of child poverty. The US ranks 34 out of 35 developed countries in terms of number of children living in poverty, which should be a national scandal but isn’t. Conservatives — who like to wring their hands about the plight of single mothers without actually asking them what they need (like, maybe health insurance?) — think marriage is the magic bullet. The federal government has spent nearly one billion dollars since 2001 on marriage promotion — a colossal waste of money. Just recently, a Heritage Foundation panel said ...

Single mothers in the US are disproportionately likely to be poor — a fact that some like to point to explain why we have such god awful rates of child poverty. The US ranks 34 out of ...

“I am tired of having to both read and write litanies for black girls gone too soon.”

Brittney Cooper has a heartbreaking and powerful piece over at Salon today about Black girls “made grown too soon” and the damage done by the cultural myth of the super-humanly strong, resilient Black woman.

I am tired of having to both read and write litanies for black girls gone too soon. For Relisha Rudd. For Renisha McBride who would have been 20 years old this month. For Karyn Washington. For Teleka Patrick. For Christina Sankey.

Some of these black girls like Karyn, age 22, and Teleka, age 30, were women. Some of them, like Relisha, were little women, made grown too soon. Some of them, like Renisha, were on the cusp of womanhood.

[...] What threads these women’s lives together is ...

Brittney Cooper has a heartbreaking and powerful piece over at Salon today about Black girls “made grown too soon” and the damage done by the cultural myth of the super-humanly strong, resilient Black woman.

I am ...

Feministing Jamz: Feminist Country Edition

Last week I got a tweet from someone telling me that they liked my Best Feminist Music Videos of 2013 post, saying they weren’t surprised that there was no country on that list and pointing me to an article on the marginalization of women artists in country. While women country artists these days definitely are marginalized within the genre, the truth is that there was no country on that list because I don’t really listen to much modern country. But I actually do like some of it — I’m partial to the ladies of classic country, myself — and I was reminded how much flack country music gets for being sexist despite there being a ...

Last week I got a tweet from someone telling me that they liked my Best Feminist Music Videos of 2013 post, saying they weren’t surprised that there was no country on that list and ...

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