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bodymap

Feminsting Reads: Bodymap by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

Lambda Literary Award-winning writer Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha’s Bodymap, published this summer by Mawenzi House, returns often to the word “home.” Home is a meeting of body and map,
tattooed on Piepzna-Samarasinha’s breastplate and charted throughout the work in sensory memories, corporeal trauma, physical pleasures. 

Lambda Literary Award-winning writer Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha’s Bodymap, published this summer by Mawenzi House, returns often to the word “home.” Home is a meeting of body and map,
tattooed on Piepzna-Samarasinha’s breastplate and charted throughout the work in ...

Under the Bus covers

Feministing Reads: Caroline Fredrickson’s Under the Bus

With her book Under the Bus: How Working Women are Being Run Over (The New Press, May 2015) Caroline Fredrickson joins a growing cadre of writers who are analyzing the precarious economic status of women workers in the United States.

With her book Under the Bus: How Working Women are Being Run Over (The New Press, May 2015) Caroline Fredrickson joins a growing cadre of writers who are analyzing the precarious economic status of ...

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“I’m a woman who’s just had a baby. My choices are limited.”

Rebecca Traister has a great, comprehensive piece about how “simple, systemic failures” — like these — ensure that “the act of having a baby turns out to be a stunningly precarious economic and professional choice” in the US. Currently at home with a new child, she notes that the fact that she’s supported by the good parental leave policy offered by The New Republic means she’s “won the woman lottery.” 

Rebecca Traister has a great, comprehensive piece about how “simple, systemic failures” — like these — ensure that “the act of having a baby turns out to be a stunningly precarious economic and professional choice” in the ...

New report shows how the “pregnancy penalty” drives economic inequality

A Better Balance, a legal advocacy organization in New York City, has a new report explaining how the “bias and inflexibility towards women in the workplace that starts when they become pregnant and snowballs into lasting economic disadvantages” is driving gender inequality and overall economic inequality in the city:

Despite advances in gender equality over the past 40 years, women continue to jeopardize their livelihoods simply by having children. The pregnancy penalty helps to explain why mothers as a whole continue to earn five to six percent less than non-mothers, and why historically disadvantaged women, single mothers and black women, have seen their wage penalties rise sharply since 1977. In New York City, single, childless women under age ...

A Better Balance, a legal advocacy organization in New York City, has a new report explaining how the “bias and inflexibility towards women in the workplace that starts when they become pregnant and snowballs ...

New Blog Alert: Where feminists talk economics

We’re thrilled to see that The Nation is launching a new roundtable blog called The Curve, “where feminists will hash out economic issues and intervene in feminist debates from an economic perspective.” The editors explain that they’ve been frustrated by two phenomena:

One is the way in which women’s voices are so frequently sidelined in economic debates. Our voices are few and far between in the economics blogosphere. It’s striking that almost none of the reviewers of Thomas Piketty’s groundbreaking Capital in the Twenty-First Centurywere women. And as Media Matters recently showed, women are rarely invited to discuss the economy on cable news.

The flipside of this problem is that, even amongst ourselves, feminists don’t talk enough about economics. Too often, discussions ...

We’re thrilled to see that The Nation is launching a new roundtable blog called The Curve, “where feminists will hash out economic issues and intervene in feminist debates from an economic perspective.” The editors explain that ...

Chart of the Day: Life expectancy for poor US women is declining

According to a new analysis from the Brookings Institute, the life expectancy gap between the rich and the poor in the US is growing, especially among women.

Comparing life expectancy at age 55 between folks born in 1920 vs. 1940 found that men, overall, have gained an additional five years — with the richest men gaining six years and the poorest gaining less than two. On average, women still live longer than men, but their life expectancy has increased by less than one year overall during this time. While the richest women have gained a few years, life expectancy among the poorest 40 percent has actually declined from the previous generation. The WSJ sums it up in the chart above. 

According to a new analysis from the Brookings Institute, the life expectancy gap between the rich and the poor in the US is growing, especially among women.

Comparing life expectancy at age 55 between folks born in 1920 ...

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