Posts Tagged Black women

Photo of the Day: #normalizebreastfeeding

When Karlesha Thurman, a 25-year-old mom and recent graduate of California State University Long Beach, posted the above image on the Facebook group page Black Women Do Breast Feed, a group dedicated to promoting awareness as well as remove the stigma of breastfeeding in black community, she wasn’t looking to stir up controversy.

If anything, it was a celebration and acknowledgement that her daughter was her inspiration for her finishing her degree. Thurman wrote in a separate Facebook note, “I found out I was pregnant my last year of college. She was my motivation to keep going, so me receiving my BA was OUR moment.” After publishing this snapshot from college graduation, Thurman was subject to some nasty comments ...

When Karlesha Thurman, a 25-year-old mom and recent graduate of California State University Long Beach, posted the above image on the Facebook group page Black Women Do Breast Feed, a group dedicated to promoting awareness ...

The reality of being a black woman: A response to Ernest Baker

Ed. note: This is a guest post written by an anonymous woman living in New York City. 

In an essay on Gawker entitled “The Reality of Dating White Women When You’re Black,” Ernest Baker writes: “Let’s be real, blonde hair and blue eyes are fucking attractive.”

A friend of mine, a black woman, responded to the line in an email to me:

“I’m pretty sure if you get in your Delorean and go back to the point where any colonized people first encountered the white man, the thought was not “That’s fucking attractive!” It was more like “What is that yellow haired thing with the demon eyes?!”

Ed. note: This is a guest post written by an anonymous woman living in New York City. 

In an essay on Gawker entitled “The Reality of Dating White Women When You’re Black,” Ernest Baker writes: “Let’s ...

When there isn’t a case for debate: Black women speak on sexual violence and solidarity

Ed. note: This post featuring black women’s voices on sexual violence, rape, race, and solidarity, was organized by Brothers Writing to Live in response to a November 2013 essay that’s recently resurfaced, containing pernicious if not new ideas concerning sex, rape and black women. Here is a good description of the initial article and subsequent fallout. This post is re-published here with permission. 

Mari Morales-Williams:

Ed. note: This post featuring black women’s voices on sexual violence, rape, race, and solidarity, was organized by Brothers Writing to Live in response to a November 2013 essay that’s recently resurfaced, containing pernicious if not new ideas ...

Watch: bell hooks and Salamishah Tillet on the welfare of Black girls

bell hooks is currently a scholar-in-residence at The New School. Last night, hooks had a conversation with Salamishah Tillet about the cultural devaluation of Black girls. It’s a topic that’s certainly being discussed around these parts. The entire conversation was livestreamed, and you can watch the full video below:

bell hooks is currently a scholar-in-residence at The New School. Last night, hooks had a conversation with Salamishah Tillet about the cultural devaluation of Black girls. It’s a topic that’s ...

“I am tired of having to both read and write litanies for black girls gone too soon.”

Brittney Cooper has a heartbreaking and powerful piece over at Salon today about Black girls “made grown too soon” and the damage done by the cultural myth of the super-humanly strong, resilient Black woman.

I am tired of having to both read and write litanies for black girls gone too soon. For Relisha Rudd. For Renisha McBride who would have been 20 years old this month. For Karyn Washington. For Teleka Patrick. For Christina Sankey.

Some of these black girls like Karyn, age 22, and Teleka, age 30, were women. Some of them, like Relisha, were little women, made grown too soon. Some of them, like Renisha, were on the cusp of womanhood.

[...] What threads these women’s lives together is ...

Brittney Cooper has a heartbreaking and powerful piece over at Salon today about Black girls “made grown too soon” and the damage done by the cultural myth of the super-humanly strong, resilient Black woman.

I am ...

Some things you might want to know about black hair before you regulate how black women wear it

The United States Army is facing criticism after releasing new appearance standards that essentially ban most of the hairstyles that black women with natural hair wear. The regulations ban twists, locks, and braids thicker than one fourth of an inch. 

The United States Army is facing criticism after releasing new appearance standards that essentially ban most of the hairstyles that black women with natural hair wear. The regulations ban twists, locks, and braids thicker than ...

Thank you Keyshia Cole for pushing back on sexist question about being “wifey material”

I’m no Keyshia Cole fan. Like any card-carrying member of the Beyhive, I gave up any hope I had for ever enjoying another Keyshia Cole track the moment she threw shade at Beyonce for “Bow Down.” (Not to mention the jabs she took at Destiny Child’s Michelle Williams during Bey’s infamous 2013 Superbowl performance.)

But as a fellow black girl, there are some things that I will always be able to appreciate about Keyshia Cole other than her two-tone weaves and the unique spelling of her name. And one of them is the ability to curse someone out in a way that only black girls can. Especially to anyone who ...

I’m no Keyshia Cole fan. Like any card-carrying member of the Beyhive, I gave up any hope I had for ever enjoying another Keyshia Cole track the moment she threw shade ...

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