Sam Huber

Sam Huber is a writer and editor living in New Haven, CT. He is a books columnist for Feministing and a graduate student in English at Yale University.

Posts Written by Sam

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Feministing Reads: Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts

Maggie Nelson’s new book The Argonauts (Graywolf Press) made me feel many things while reading, but nothing more often than giddy. So many kinds of joyfully awed, for so many reasons. I have joked to friends that I cannot distinguish between loving The Argonauts because it is good and loving it because it is the kind of book I am always trying to read, wanting to write. (And what is the former if not the latter, anyway?)

Maggie Nelson’s new book The Argonauts (Graywolf Press) made me feel many things while reading, but nothing more often than giddy. So many kinds of joyfully awed, for so many reasons. I have joked to ...

Toni Morrison

Feministing Reads: Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child

Toni Morrison is a national treasure, and a new Morrison novel is a national event. Superlatives proliferate: she is among our greatest chroniclers of American history, our greatest portraitists of black communal life, our greatest analysts of subjectivity under duress, our greatest institutional advocates for black feminist literature. 

Toni Morrison is a national treasure, and a new Morrison novel is a national event. Superlatives proliferate: she is among our greatest chroniclers of American history, our greatest portraitists of black communal life, our greatest analysts ...

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Feministing Reads: Asali Solomon’s Disgruntled

In the foreword to her debut novel The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison describes how she came to write her classic story of an isolated black girl’s disavowal of blackness.

In the foreword to her debut novel The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison describes how she came to write her classic story of an isolated black girl’s disavowal of blackness.

citizen

Feministing Reads: Claudia Rankine’s Citizen

On the night of the grand jury’s failure to indict Darren Wilson for the murder of Michael Brown and again the night after, marching the length of Manhattan with a few thousand others, trying and failing to find some place sufficient to accommodate our anger or our grief, our newly or long-broken hearts, our need to feel responsive or responded to, a line from Claudia Rankine’s Citizen floated on the surface of my full skull: “To your mind, feelings are what create a person, something unwilling, something wild vandalizing whatever the skull holds. Those sensations form a someone.”

On the night of the grand jury’s failure to indict Darren Wilson for the murder of Michael Brown and again the night after, marching the length of Manhattan with a few thousand others, trying and failing to ...

Feministing Readz: Land of Love and Drowning

If I were to derive a formula for character development from Land of Love and Drowning, I’d return to watch Eeona rework a central myth in sleep: “She dreamed about a school of women walking out of the ocean. Then she dreamed it again. And again. Until in the dream she was finally one of the women.” Decide what your freest self looks like; conjure it into being; inhabit it as long as it holds. The next morning she wakes, makes her way to sea, and nearly drowns. Abandon and repeat as needed.

The adjectives so far affixed by reviewers to Tiphanie Yanique’s debut novel hold, and bear repeating: “epic,” “ambitious,” and “lush” all recur deservedly. Land follows ...

If I were to derive a formula for character development from Land of Love and Drowning, I’d return to watch Eeona rework a central myth in sleep: “She dreamed about a school of women ...

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