Dana Bolger

Dana Bolger is a Senior Editor at Feministing and the co-founder of Know Your IX, the national youth-led organization working to end gender violence in schools. She's testified before Congress on Title IX policy and legislative reform, and her writing has appeared in a number of outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. She's also a student at Yale Law School, and you can find her on Twitter at @danabolger.

Posts Written by Dana

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2017 Recap: Our Favorite Feminist Films

As Hollywood slowly drained itself of white dudes who harass women, it was a good year for film and television centering the experiences of women, queer folks, and people of color. Without further ado, our favorites.

As Hollywood slowly drained itself of white dudes who harass women, it was a good year for film and television centering the experiences of women, queer folks, and people of color. Without further ado, our favorites.

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2017 Recap: Our Favorite Feminist Writing on the Internet

We’re taking a break from writing this week to eat and sleep and plan for 2018. Instead of our regular columns, we’ll spend the next few days reflecting on our “favorites” of 2017: favorite books, favorite movies, etc. Here’s some of our columnists’ favorite writing of 2017.

We’re taking a break from writing this week to eat and sleep and plan for 2018. Instead of our regular columns, we’ll spend the next few days reflecting on our “favorites” of 2017: favorite books, favorite movies, ...

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Dear New York Times: Matt Lauer Isn’t a Martyr. Don’t Make Him One.

In law school, we spend a lot of time thinking about the “theory of the case”: what’s the problem, who’s the victim, who’s the villain. It turns out that how you define the problem directly informs the kind of solution that a judge, a lawmaker, or, say, the readers of the New York Times, are primed to accept.

In law school, we spend a lot of time thinking about the “theory of the case”: what’s the problem, who’s the victim, who’s the villain. It turns out that how you define the problem directly informs the kind of ...

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