Chloe Angyal

Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia. She joined the Feministing team in 2009. Her writing about politics and popular culture has been published in The Atlantic, The Guardian, New York magazine, Reuters, The LA Times and many other outlets in the US, Australia, UK, and France. She makes regular appearances on radio and television in the US and Australia. She has an AB in Sociology from Princeton University and a PhD in Arts and Media from the University of New South Wales. Her academic work focuses on Hollywood romantic comedies; her doctoral thesis was about how the genre depicts gender, sex, and power, and grew out of a series she wrote for Feministing, the Feministing Rom Com Review. Chloe is a Senior Facilitator at The OpEd Project and a Senior Advisor to The Harry Potter Alliance. You can read more of her writing at chloesangyal.com

Posts Written by Chloe

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Rape, Rolling Stone, and the radical notion that women are trustworthy

Last week, Rolling Stone distanced themselves from the tale of a horrifying gang rape at the heart of their story about the culture of sexual violence at the University of Virginia, after concerns arose about “discrepancies” in the account of the survivor, Jackie. Now the Washington Post is re-investigating those discrepancies, uncovering major mistakes in Rolling Stone‘s reporting.

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Australian Minister for Women: “Let boys be boys and girls be girls”

We’ve covered Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, and his, shall we say, less than feminist ideas, before. Abbott has declared himself a feminist, but this week, the PM made some comments that suggest he should re-read — ok, fine, read – his Judith Butler. 

We’ve covered Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, and his, shall we say, less than feminist ideas, before. Abbott has declared himself a feminist, but this week, the PM made some comments that suggest ...

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Australian Army chief to men: Stop being bystanders to violence against women

Last year, as you might remember, Australian Army Lieutenant General David Morrison — the top ranked man in the Australian armed forces — made a video addressing sexual violence in the ranks. He famously urged men in the armed forces to stop being bystanders to sexual abuse among their colleagues, and told them that “the standard you walk past is the standard you accept.” 

Last year, as you might remember, Australian Army Lieutenant General David Morrison — the top ranked man in the Australian armed forces — made a video addressing sexual violence in the ranks. He famously urged men ...

Quick Hit: The Rainbow Letters

Remember Zach Wahls? He’s the young man who, in 2011, stood up at an Iowa House of Representatives hearing to testify against amending the state constitution. The proposed amendment would have made same sex marriage, once again, illegal in the Hawkeye State.

Of course you remember him, because you probably remember tearing up while watching this video. You might also remember that some of us at Feministing felt the urge to immediately propose marriage to him.

Now, Wahls has teamed up with another young person raised by queer parents, Julia Winston, to compile The Rainbow Letters, a series of letters from people of all ages who were raised by queer parents.

Remember Zach Wahls? He’s the young man who, in 2011, stood up at an Iowa House of Representatives hearing to testify against amending the state constitution. The proposed amendment would have made same sex marriage, once again, ...

Guest post: What is it with witches?

This is a guest post co-written by Dannielle Miller and Nina Funnell. Miller is co-founder and CEO of Australia’s largest provider of workshops that empower teen girls,  Enlighten Education. She is also author of The Butterfly Effect: A Positive New Approach to Raising Happy, Confident Teen Girls, and The Girl With The Butterfly Tattoo: A Girl’s Guide to Claiming Her Power. Funnell is a journalist and author whose main areas of interest include gender equality, technology, education and youth. In 2010 Nina was awarded the Australian Human Rights Community (Individual) award for her work in violence prevention, and was named a finalist for Young Australian of the Year. Together, they co-wrote Loveability: An Empowered Girl’s Guide to Dating and Relationships.

Pointed hats, ...

This is a guest post co-written by Dannielle Miller and Nina Funnell. Miller is co-founder and CEO of Australia’s largest provider of workshops that empower teen girls,  Enlighten Education. She is also author of The Butterfly ...

Australian state considers police body cams in domestic violence cases

One Australian state is considering legislation that would allow police to wear body mounted cameras when entering domestic violence scenes, and allowing for the use of the recordings they collect in court proceedings.

New South Wales – the most populous state in the nation – is the first to consider this kind of legislation, under which, “video statements from the victim, taken at the scene, and powerful video footage taken in the immediate aftermath of domestic violence incidents, will be used as evidence in court cases.” 

One Australian state is considering legislation that would allow police to wear body mounted cameras when entering domestic violence scenes, and allowing for the use of the recordings they collect in court proceedings.

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Want to know what transgender rights look like in the US? There’s a map for that.

Vocativ and the National Center for Transgender Equality have put together this handy — somewhat horrifying — map series about the state of transgender rights in the US, state by state. 

Vocativ and the National Center for Transgender Equality have put together this handy — somewhat horrifying — map series about the state of transgender rights in the US, state by state. 

The American restaurant industry is number one for sexual harassment claims

The first time I was ever sexually harassed on the job, it was while waiting tables. The second, third, fourth, and fifth times I was sexually harassed on the job, it was while waiting tables. The first time, I reported it to my boss, but it happened so often that I stopped telling her about it. I learned to just grit my teeth and bring the assholes their beer.

Of all the sexual harassment claims that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission receives every year, fully 37 percent of them come from one place: the restaurant industry. That makes the restaurant industry the largest source of sexual harassment claims to the EEOC in the nation – and that’s before you account ...

The first time I was ever sexually harassed on the job, it was while waiting tables. The second, third, fourth, and fifth times I was sexually harassed on the job, it was while waiting tables. The ...

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