usesofanger

Mahroh on Self-Care: “Engaging in Self-Care Means Letting Ourselves Feel Fury”

This past year has been an unending parade of violence, replayed over and over again on our television screens, and this week has been no exception.

In the wake of the near-daily revelations of women Donald Trump has harassed or assaulted or shamed — not to mention a call to repeal women’s political participation entirely — Feministing friend and MTV writer Julie Zeilinger asked feminist activists what they’re doing to take care of themselves in the time of Trump. And our own Mahroh, in the spirit of Black feminist Audre Lorde, passed along her wisdom:

Self-care talk often asks us to find ways to bring joy into our lives. And while this is so important, I hope we also carve space to recognize that joy may be hard to find for many of us right now. Our anger, especially for those of us who are Muslim or survivors of color, is read as threatening, too negative, or some other bullshit. But rage at the violence we face is human, it is loving, and it is what drives us to demand better[...] Engaging in self-care means letting ourselves feel fury.

Check out others’ reflections and the piece in full here.

Header image via.

New Haven, CT

Dana Bolger is a Senior Editor at Feministing and the co-founder of Know Your IX, the national youth-led organization working to end gender violence in schools. She's testified before Congress on Title IX policy and legislative reform, and her writing has appeared in a number of outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. She's also a student at Yale Law School, and you can find her on Twitter at @danabolger.

Dana Bolger is a Senior Editor at Feministing and a student at Yale Law School.

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