“I need some white privilege”: In response to that potato salad Kickstarter

Yaya is wearing a hat, glasses, and throwing deuces

Yaya is looking to crowdfund some white privilege.

You may have heard about that guy who raised a ton of money for his potato salad. If you didn’t, well, there’s not much more to it than that — some dude made a Kickstarter campaign for a potato salad and it went viral, raising over $40,000 as of this writing. I guess it’s some big joke for people, but alongside all this is an important discussion about white privilege and internet fundraising. 

Yaya M. has landed on a pretty genius response, in the form of their own crowd-sourcing campaign: I need some white privilege!

I am writing you today to ask that you assist me in acquiring some white privilege. Although I have layered oppressions that have affected my ability to access my slice of the American Pie™, no issue has affected me more readily than my lack of white privilege. From being assumed to have “cheated” my way into programs for gifted children AND college (via affirmative action), to having my natural hair viewed as unprofessional amongst professional peers, to having people make negative assumptions about my competency level, interests, and job knowledge, to being viewed as naturally dangerous or threatening, my lack of white privilege has created numerous obstacles as I’ve struggled to successfully compete in a white dominated workforce. I am hoping that, through this campaign, I will begin to make some headway towards closing the gap that white privilege has created in my life.

Yaya calculated the fundraising goal by taking the percentage amount Black women make as compared to white men for the same work — that’s 69% — and arrived at $135,000 to make up for the 15 years of underpaid work. Now this I can get behind!

1bfea3e7449eff65a94e2e55a8b7acda-bpfullVerónica especially loves this kickstarters’ sarcastic perks. 

 

New York, NY

Verónica Bayetti Flores has spent the last years of her life living and breathing reproductive justice. She has led national policy and movement building work on the intersections of immigrants' rights, health care access, young parenthood, and LGBTQ liberation, and has worked to increase access to contraception and abortion, fought for paid sick leave, and demanded access to safe public space for queer youth of color. In 2008 Verónica obtained her Master’s degree in the Sexuality and Health program at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. She loves cooking, making art, listening to music, and thinking about the ways art forms traditionally seen as feminine are valued and devalued. In addition to writing for Feministing, she is currently spending most of her time doing policy work to reduce the harms of LGBTQ youth of color's interactions with the police and making sure abortion care is accessible to all regardless of their income.

Verónica is a queer immigrant writer, activist, and rabble-rouser.

Read more about Verónica

Join the Conversation

Comments are closed.