Natalie Portman: Feminist characters are more than just “kick ass”

Natalie Portman
In an interview with Elle, Natalie Portman describes what feminism is for her, as an actress:

I want every version of a woman and a man to be possible. I want women and men to be able to be full-time parents or full-time working people or any combination of the two. I want both to be able to do whatever they want sexually without being called names. I want them to be allowed to be weak and strong and happy and sad — human, basically. The fallacy in Hollywood is that if you’re making a “feminist” story, the woman kicks ass and wins. That’s not feminist, that’s macho. A movie about a weak, vulnerable woman can be feminist if it shows a real person that we can empathize with.

So let me get this straight? Feminist character roles for women are basically characters with a 3D personality? Feminists can be weak sometimes? And wait a second, feminism is for men too?

This woman seems to know her stuff.

Related:

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Bay Area, California

Juliana is a writer, a speaker, and a consultant. Her blogging work focuses on feminist and racial justice movements lead by Latinas throughout the Americas, touching on issues such as environmental justice, immigration, colonization, land rights and indigenous movements. She has been a regular Contributor to Feministing since Spring of 2013, and also been published on the Huffington Post, Mic, and the Feminist Wire. Juliana studied Latin American and Latinx Studies at the University of California and is now based in the Bay Area where she has worked with various organizations on social media and communications strategy. In her free time, she likes to dance salsa and tango and practice Portuguese with her cousins via Skype.

Juliana is a Latina feminist writer and digital communications specialist living in California.

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  • http://feministing.com/members/5panktastic/ Rita-Mae

    Natalie Hershel’s on point! It’s a shame women are still so misrepresented in pop culture. The latest season of Boardwalk Empire has, as its’ catalytic event-prompting trigger, a woman make a false rape claim against a black man. The man is portrayed as a perfect innocent and receives no punishment while the “she-devil” is murdered.

    To portray women in any era as lying about rape and rapists as innocents, to the point we in the audience are to glory in her brutal murder, is so deplorable I stopped watching this show.

  • http://feministing.com/members/jc06111/ j

    Re: Portman, what’s surely not feminist: having an affair and getting pregnant w/ a married man on set, i.e., humiliating the then-wife (knowing the press would be all over it), rather than waiting until after his divorce …