Natalie Portman: Feminist characters are more than just “kick ass”

Natalie Portman
In an interview with Elle, Natalie Portman describes what feminism is for her, as an actress:

I want every version of a woman and a man to be possible. I want women and men to be able to be full-time parents or full-time working people or any combination of the two. I want both to be able to do whatever they want sexually without being called names. I want them to be allowed to be weak and strong and happy and sad — human, basically. The fallacy in Hollywood is that if you’re making a “feminist” story, the woman kicks ass and wins. That’s not feminist, that’s macho. A movie about a weak, vulnerable woman can be feminist if it shows a real person that we can empathize with.

So let me get this straight? Feminist character roles for women are basically characters with a 3D personality? Feminists can be weak sometimes? And wait a second, feminism is for men too?

This woman seems to know her stuff.

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2 Comments

  1. Posted October 1, 2013 at 12:23 pm | Permalink

    Natalie Hershel’s on point! It’s a shame women are still so misrepresented in pop culture. The latest season of Boardwalk Empire has, as its’ catalytic event-prompting trigger, a woman make a false rape claim against a black man. The man is portrayed as a perfect innocent and receives no punishment while the “she-devil” is murdered.

    To portray women in any era as lying about rape and rapists as innocents, to the point we in the audience are to glory in her brutal murder, is so deplorable I stopped watching this show.

  2. j
    Posted October 5, 2013 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

    Re: Portman, what’s surely not feminist: having an affair and getting pregnant w/ a married man on set, i.e., humiliating the then-wife (knowing the press would be all over it), rather than waiting until after his divorce …

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