“Blurred Lines” remix feat. actual rapists’ words

*Trigger warning*

Well, sorta.

Like Ann, I’ll admit that Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” was a staple in my summer jamz rotation (at least until the new Katy Perry roared onto the scene). It’s not that I didn’t notice the super rapey lyrics, but I regularly enjoy pop culture that I could–and would–tear apart if I were writing a blog post instead of turning the volume up and the windows down. I don’t even feel guilty about it in the least. And I don’t actually agree that banning a song like “Blurred Lines” is the answer.

What I do believe in is deconstructing pop culture and being real about the ways it reflects, reinforces, and promotes dangerous cultural assumptions and message. And here’s an excellent–and very disturbing–post at Sociological Images that does just that.

Lyrics from the song are followed by images, culled from Project Unbreakable, of women and men holding signs with sentences that their rapist said to them before, during, or after the assault. It’s impossible to hear lines like, “I know you want it” as just context-free fun after seeing them echoed, again and again, by people who were likely fully aware of the line, crossed it anyway, and benefit greatly from a culture that insists it’s oh-so-blurry.

woman holding sign saying "I know you want it."

 person holding sign saying, "You know you want it. Come on __ give in to pleasure."

Head over to Sociological Images to see the breakdown of the rest of the song.

New Orleans, LA

Maya Dusenbery is an Executive Director in charge of Editorial at Feministing. Maya has previously worked at NARAL Pro-Choice New York and the National Institute for Reproductive Health and was a fellow at Mother Jones magazine. She graduated with a B.A. from Carleton College in 2008. A Minnesota native, she currently lives, writes, edits, and bakes bread in Atlanta, Georgia.

Maya Dusenbery is an Executive Director of Feministing in charge of Editorial.

Read more about Maya

Join the Conversation

kal penn script

From Kuchibhotla to Kal Penn: How Hate Crimes Build Off Liberal Media

Yesterday, the New Yorker published a stirring article on Being Indian in Trump’s America, a rumination by Amitava Kumar on racial violence, hate crimes and the tensions that come with being South Asian in America. Around the same time, Indian American actor Kal Penn tweeted images of racist scripts offered to him at the beginning of his acting career. The two pieces, juxtaposed together, offer a handy depiction of hate: a dehumanization project that begins with media stereotyping and logically concludes in racist violence.

Hate crimes have risen since Donald Trump’s election. One month after Trump’s election, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, an Indian man, was shot dead in Kansas by a white gunman yelling “get out of my country,” ...

Yesterday, the New Yorker published a stirring article on Being Indian in Trump’s America, a rumination by Amitava Kumar on racial violence, hate crimes and the tensions that come with being South Asian in America. Around ...

Mitski

The Feministing Five: Mitski

When I first listened to 26-year-old indie sensation Mitski’s latest album, Puberty 2, I was blown away by how vividly, messily human it felt to me.

She was emotional, she was strong, she was defiant, she was vulnerable. She sang about feeling ugly, finding calm, the fleeting nature of happiness, and so much in between. In the past few months, the album, Mitski’s fourth, has been featured on numerous “Best Of” lists and hailed for its haunting lyricism and experimental instrumentation. A New Yorker profile described the artist as escaping trappings of genre, situated “only within her own emotional landscape”. Sounded ...

When I first listened to 26-year-old indie sensation Mitski’s latest album, Puberty 2, I was blown away by how vividly, messily human it felt to me.

She was ...