Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

“We’re” not raising Trayvon.

Read Questlove, on the Zimmerman verdict.

Rachel Jeantel: “You can’t disrespect me. It’s not going to hurt me.”

Texas’s abortion restrictions will disproportionately affect Latin@s.

“In an era of macho antiheroes, Finn countered that being a man didn’t have to include physical strength or objectifying women, but could instead be defined by expressiveness, vulnerability, and compassion. He failed as a quarterback, a soldier, and a boyfriend, but he succeeded in glee club, where he sang and danced and hung around with a bunch of queer kids.” That’s The Atlantic on Glee‘s Finn Hudson, played by the late Cory Monteith.

 

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Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia. She joined the Feministing team in 2009. Her writing about politics and popular culture has been published in The Atlantic, The Guardian, New York magazine, Reuters, The LA Times and many other outlets in the US, Australia, UK, and France. She makes regular appearances on radio and television in the US and Australia. She has an AB in Sociology from Princeton University and a PhD in Arts and Media from the University of New South Wales. Her academic work focuses on Hollywood romantic comedies; her doctoral thesis was about how the genre depicts gender, sex, and power, and grew out of a series she wrote for Feministing, the Feministing Rom Com Review. Chloe is a Senior Facilitator at The OpEd Project and a Senior Advisor to The Harry Potter Alliance. You can read more of her writing at chloesangyal.com

Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia.

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  • http://feministing.com/members/samll/ Sam L-L

    I’m not so sure about that last one – my wife and I more or less stopped watching Glee after Finn was very physically abusive to another character, Brody, because a) Brody was dating Finn’s ex-girlfriend, whom Finn scarily possessively referred to as “my future wife” and b) because Brody was a sex worker. We were both pretty discomfited by the narrative lens of the show apparently condoning Finn’s actions (or at least, he was never called on it and Brody faded out of the narrative). If anything we always felt that the show over-focused on Finn and Rachel, as far as we could tell, because they were the straight cis white ones, when basically everyone else was funnier and more interesting.