Project Unspoken: “It should be a right to walk down the street and be safe.”

A powerful video put together by Project Unspoken at Emory University asks both men and women what they do in their daily lives to avoid sexual assault and harassment.  Not surprisingly all of the men interviewed say they don’t do anything to avoid being attacked, while the woman are constantly adjusting their behavior to protect themselves from gender based violence.  None of this is surprising but it’s a great video that effectively shows how differently men and women move throughout the world.

Transcript to come (and if someone wants to help and put one in the comments below I would be forever in your debt).

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5 Comments

  1. Posted November 8, 2012 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

    Awesome video. Brought tears to my eyes.

    Makes me think…what would it be like to live in a world without male violence against women? It has become so pervasive, that we women, trans, cis, bi, gay, straight, queer, don’t even think about it, yet it shapes our psychology in ways that seem so normal, so every-day life. IF ONLY we could leave the pussy at home, as Ms. Wanda said. Until then we just keep fighting the fight.

  2. Posted November 8, 2012 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

    Project Unspoken

    Voiceover: What do you do on a daily basis to avoid rape, sexual assault, or harrassment?
    [Respondents presenting as men...]
    1: Well… travel in groups?… I’m not really that worried about it personally.
    2: By harassment, do you mean sexual harassment?
    3: Wow…that’s a good question…
    4: There are not a lot of scenarios where I am thinking with an awareness I might be at risk.
    2: …Nothing.
    5: …er….
    6: On a daily basis?…
    7: I guess nothing in particular.
    8: I don’t have a rape whistle, so I don’t have that option, but I just try to be aware, wherever I am, more or less. Other than that, [I] haven’t thought about it too much.
    9: Nothing
    10: I can’t say that I have personally felt at risk or in the past have been an object or victim of those things.
    11: On a daily basis, I don’t really walk around at night. Other than that, not really anything.
    6: I don’t think a lot about my own personal protection relative to rape or sexual violence.
    12: I don’t think that’s something that every really crosses my mind on a regular basis.
    [Respondents presenting as women]
    1: So I try to always be aware of my surroundings, you know at night walk where it’s lit, have a buddy, just be generally aware of where I am, who’s around.
    2: I come out of work… I have the late night shift…you know, you look around wherever you walk. You make sure your keys are with you. You know, you kind of think in your head, hunh… if somebody were to come out, right now, what would I do? Would I scream? Is there anybody around? Would I… am I able to punch them? Am I able to do anything? How close am I to my car? You know, do I… How fast can I get into my car and lock the door?
    3: I usually travel with a large group of people.
    4: When I go to parties, I make sure not to take drinks from strangers.
    5: Some of the things that I think about… What am I going to wear today; where am I going, and who am I with, because a lot of those factors affect how safe I feel.
    6: I don’t walk next to 15 passenger vans on the side with a door.
    7: I try to watch what I say around other people. I try not to be too friendly, or make eye contact with people I don’t know.
    8: I’m probably less trusting than I should be able to be.
    9: If it’s evening or night, I’m looking for the closest parking spot.
    10: If I’m on the street or whatever, I’ll try to go where there are people as opposed to venturing off, like by myself.
    2: I was recently talking to a lady who tells me that every time she drives crosscountry or, you know, takes any trips, she makes sure her hair is tucked up under her cap, and she wears sunglasses and wears like a big biker shirt and she basically tries to pass off as a guy in the car so that nobody will try to harass her or chase her, which they have done before.
    3: I’m just sort of constantly wary, and it’s kind of frustrating…
    6: I let someone know when I’m leaving, wherever I’m going, and then I call them when I get home so that there is, sort of like a trail, so that if somebody was worried or concerned that they hadn’t heard from me, then they would at least know when was the last time I contacted somebody.
    1: I have to think pretty specifically, when I go out for a run, whether I feel safe in that environment or not… have to kind of always watch my back. It’s unfortunate, but that’s how it is.
    2: It should be a right, to walk down the street and be safe. Not something that you have to actively work hard at, because somebody thinks that if we fail in any sort of personal safety issue, we’re looking for it. If we walk somewhere where we shouldn’t be walking; if we wear something we shouldn’t be wearing; if we say something or act slightly, you know, not… I don’t know… “safe”… or you know “back off of me”… If we fail to do any of that, automatically, we’re looking to have been raped or assaulted – and that’s what should be changed.

    Voiceover:

    In the United States, one out of every six women, and one out of every 33 men have been the victim of attempted or completed rape in their lifetime.
    In every two minutes, someone in the country is sexually assaulted.
    Fifteen percent of sexual assault and rape victims are under the age of 12.
    Approximately 2/3 of rapes were committed by someone known to the victim, and about 38% of rapists are a friend or acquaintance.
    At least 54% of rapes and sexual assaults go unreported.
    Only 3% of rapists ever serve a day in jail. That means the other 97% walk away free.
    Globally, about six out of every 10 women experience physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime.
    For women and girls in the age group of 16-44 rape and domestic violence pose more of a threat to their health and wellbeing than cancer, motor vehicle accidents, war and malaria combined.

    Voices (alternating masculine and feminine, at increasing speed until they overlap)
    I’m tired of being afraid of other people.
    I’m tired of hearing about my friends being taken advantage of.
    I’m tired of people using “I was drunk” as an excuse for sexual assault.
    I’m tired of stories that bring me disappointment about human behavior.
    I’m tired of victims feeling like it’s your fault. It’s not your fault. You’re not a victim, you’re a survivor.
    I’m tired of so many rapists going unpunished.
    I’m tired of being scared when I’m alone.
    I’m tired of apathy.
    I’m tired of hearing that people think sexual assault only happens to women.
    I’m tired of victims being stigmatized for something that’s out of their control.
    I’m tired of it not being taken seriously.
    I’m tired of not doing enough to educate myself about these issues.
    I’m tired of people saying that this is a women’s issue. This is an everybody issue.
    I’m tired of hearing that rape victims feel guiltier than their rapists.
    I’m tired of hearing about people being trapped in abusive relationships.
    I’m tired of not realizing the severity of the consequences of sexual assault.
    I’m tired of victims feeling like they’re alone.
    I’m tired of the fact that …[I'm tired statements overlapping into babel.]

    I’m tired of the silence.

  3. Posted November 8, 2012 at 11:22 pm | Permalink

    Project Unspoken

    Male voice off camera (MVOC) #1 “What do you do on a daily basis to avoid rape, sexual assault, or harassment?”

    Man #1 “Um, well, travel in groups? Well not, not really. I’m not really worried about it, personally.”

    Man #2 “By harassment you mean, sexual harassment?”

    Man #3 “Wow, that’s a good question, umm…”

    Man #4 “There are not many, ya know, not many scenarios where I am thinking with an awareness about ‘I might be at risk.’ “

    Man #2 “Nothing.”

    Man #5 “Um…”

    Man #6 “On a daily basis…”

    Man #7 “Um, I guess nothing in particular”

    Man #8 “Um, I don’t have a rape whistle so I don’t, I don’t have that option, but um. Uh, I just try to be aware of wherever I am, more or less. Other than that, I haven’t thought about it too much.

    Man #9 “Nothin’”

    Man #10 “Um, I can’t say that I have personally felt at risk, or in the past have been an object or victim of those things”

    Man #5 “Within a daily basis I just, I don’t walk around a lot at night. Um, other than that, I mean, not really anything.”

    Man #6 “I don’t think a lot about my own personal protection, uh, relative to rape or sexual violence.”

    Man #8 “I don’t think that’s something that crosses, that ever really crosses my mind on a regular basis.”

    Woman #1 “So I try to always be aware of my surroundings. Um, you know, at night walk where it’s lit, have a buddy. Just be generally aware of where I am and who’s around.”

    Woman #2 “If I come out of work and I have the, the late night shift, you know, you look around wherever you walk. You make sure your keys are with you. You know, you kind of think in your head, ‘Huh, so if somebody were to come out right now what would I do? Would I scream? Is there anybody around? Um, would I, am I able to punch them? Am I able to do anything? How close am I to my car? Ya know, do I, ya know, how fast can I get into my car and lock the door.’ “

    Woman #3 “I usually travel, ya know, with like, a large group of people.”

    Woman #4 “When I go to parties, I make sure not to take drinks from strangers.”

    Woman #5 “Some of the things that I think about: Um, what am I going to wear today? Um, where am I going? And, who am I with? Um, because a lot of those factors affect, um, how safe I feel.”

    Woman #6 “I don’t walk next to large, fifteen passenger vans on the side with a door. “

    Woman #7 “I, I try to watch what I say around other people. I try not to be too friendly or make eye contact with people I don’t know”

    Woman #8 “I’m probably less trusting than I should be able to be.”

    Woman #9 “If it’s evening or night I’m looking for the closest parking spot.”

    Woman #10 “If I’m on the street, or whatever, I’ll try to go where there are people as opposed to, kinda like, venturing off, like by myself.”

    Woman #2 “I was recently talking to a lady who tells me that every time she drives cross-country or ya know, takes any trips, she makes sure her hair is tucked up under her cap, and she wears sunglasses, and she has, like, a big biker shirt. She basically tries to pass off as a guy in the car so nobody will try to harass her or chase her. Which they have done before.”

    Woman #7 “I’m just sort of constantly wary, and it’s kind of frustrating.”

    Woman #6 “I let someone know when I’m leaving, wherever I’m going, and then I call them when I get home, so that there is sort of like a trail so that if somebody was worried or concerned, if they never heard from me, uh, they would at least know when was the last time I contacted somebody.”

    Woman #1 “I have to think pretty specifically, ya know, before I go out for a run. Um, whether I feel safe in that environment, or not. Um, have to kind of always watch my back. It’s unfortunate, but that’s how it is.”

    Woman #2 “It is, should be a right to walk down the street and be safe. Not something that you have to actively work hard at. Because somebody thinks that if we fail in any sort of personal safety issue we’re ‘looking for it.’ If we walk somewhere where we shouldn’t be walking, if we wear something that we shouldn’t be wearing. If we say something, or act slightly, you know, not ‘safe’ or ‘back off of me,’ If we fail to do any of that, automatically we’re ‘looking’ to have been raped or assaulted. And that’s what should be changed.”

    MVOC #1 “In the united states one out of every six women, and one out of every thirty-three men have been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in their lifetime. In every two minutes, someone in the country is sexually assaulted. Fifteen percent of sexual assault and rape victims are under the age of twelve. Approximately two-thirds of rapes were committed by someone known to the victim. And about thirty-eight percent of rapists are a friend or acquaintance. At least fifty-four percent of rapes and sexual assaults go un-reported. Only three percent of rapists ever serve a day in jail. That means the other ninety-seven percent walk away free. Globally, about six out of every ten women experience physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime. For women and girls in the age group of sixteen to fourty-four, rape and domestic violence pose more of a threat to their health and well-being than cancer, motor vehicle accidents, war, and malaria combined.

    Female voice off camera (FVOC) #1 “I’m tired of being afraid of other people.”

    MVOC #2 “I am tired of hearing about my friends being taken advantage of”

    FVOC #3 “I am tired of people using, ‘I was drunk,’ as an excuse for sexual assault”

    MVOC #3 “I am tired of stories that bring me disappointment about human behavior”

    FVOC #4 “I am tired of victims feeling like it’s your fault. It’s not your fault. You’re not a victim, you’re a survivor.”

    MVOC #4 “I am tired of so many rapists going unpunished.”

    FVOC #5 “I am tired of being scared when I’m alone.”

    MVOC #5 “I am tired of apathy”

    FVOC #6 “I am tired of hearing that people think sexual assault only happens to women.”

    MVOC #6 “I am tired of victims being stigmatized for something that’s out of their control.”

    FVOC #7 “I am tired of it not being taken seriously.”

    MVOC #7 “I am tired of not doing enough to educate myself about these issues.”

    FVOC #8 “I am tired of people saying this is a women’s issue. This is an everybody issue.”

    MVOC #8 “I am tired of hearing that rape victims feel guiltier than their rapists.”

    FVOC #9 “I am tired of hearing about people being trapped in abusive relationships.”

    MVOC #9 “I am tired of people not realizing the severity of the consequences of sexual assault.”

    FVOC #10 “I am tired of victims feeling like they’re alone.”

    MVOC #10 “I am tired of the fact that some of those who could make a difference fail to do so.”

    FVOC #11 “I am tired of guys thinking they know better and that…

    (lots of voices all talking over each other)

    MVOC #1 “I am tired of the silence…”

  4. Posted November 9, 2012 at 1:37 pm | Permalink

    I have an older son and two young daughters, this video made me realise (again) how we (society) continue to teach our daughters how not to get raped, versus spending more time on teaching our sons not to rape.

    I live in South Africa, and this video only hints at the imbalance that exists in our society.

  5. Posted November 13, 2012 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

    First off, thank you very much for posting this. It has helped Project Unspoken’s publicity a ton!

    Secondly, we recently released the second video of Project Unspoken 24 hours ago. Check it out here: http://youtu.be/ljTE83k1DD0

    I would greatly appreciate it if you can share it. It’s time the world acknowledges the harmful consequences of sexual violence.

    Best,
    Caleb Peng
    Creator of Project Unspoken

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