Real talk from Zoe Saldana on equality

Zoe Saldana discusses the intense standards put on women in Hollywood, mothering and the expiration date of sexy. via Upworthy. 

(If someone can create a transcript, that would be great!)

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2 Comments

  1. Posted September 5, 2012 at 6:50 pm | Permalink

    Transcript!

    Saldana: When was it that this decision was made where I was gonna be told that I have an equal participation in life – of rights and ideals and everything, but in reality I wasn’t going to be allowed to exercise them all. You know like, when I – to me what hurts me is the fact that, you know, you’re told all the time, it’s like, “we’re equal, I don’t know, what is your deal, like, what is your f*cking issue with this or with that?” And then you realize, no actually, we’re not, you’re getting paid more than I,

    de Cadenet: Right

    Saldana: - you get to have more options in terms of like, um, what you watch for entertainment. When you go to the movies, you have 90 movies. 90 different stories that you can watch through your eyes, through the eyes of a male. I – and one complaint that I might make, one observation that is actually very, very true is that there isn’t enough things for us, for women out there, it’s like, “shut up. Okay, why aren’t you happy, why can’t you just be more like every girl? Like, just, why do you always have to try to be a man?”

    de Cadenet: It’s not even about that. I know, I know.

    Saldana: And, it’s not even trying to be a man, it’s about trying to feel significant, trying to feel equal, trying to really believe that my purpose in life is more than just, be half of something else and deliver this – the packages, the kids, to this individual so that they can glorify themselves. I don’t, I, I lose – by the time I’m in my thirties and I’ve fallen in love and I have my career, I’m gonna be making less than a man, I’m going to lose my name to a man.

    de Cadenet: And by the way during your peak earning years, you’re also at your most fertile years, so a lot of women are like, having babies and not earning during those years, and then they can’t, they’re not, they’re gonna come back in the workplace, they’re not earning anywhere close to what they were before they had kids.

    Saldana: And by the time they come back they’re unattractive.

    de Cadenet: Precisely.

    Saldana: They’re breastfeeding some child, I can’t picture them you know, in a bathsuit somewhere. You just go, aw can’t I –

    de Cadenet: So, less job opportunity

    Saldana: Yeah, well you go from like, being a sex – you know, you go from being the mistress characters to then like, this sex symbol woman, to then you have a baby ’cause you wanna take a break and really have a life, and you come back and all of a sudden you’re a soccer mom.

  2. Posted September 5, 2012 at 7:35 pm | Permalink

    Zoe Saldana: When was it that this decision was made where I was going to be told that I have an equal participation in life, of rights, and ideals, and everything? But, in reality, I wasn’t going to be allowed to exercise them all.

    You know, to me what hurts me is the fact that, you know, you’re told all the time “well, we’re equal, I don’t know, what is your deal? What is your fucking issue with this or that?” and then you realize no, actually we’re not. You’re getting paid more than I am. You get to have more options in terms of what you want to watch for entertainment. When you go to the movies, you have 90 movies. 90 different stories that you can watch through your eyes, through the eyes of a male. One complaint that I might make, one observation that’s actually very very true about the fact that there isn’t enough things for us, for women out there, it’s like “shut up?”

    Amanda de Cadnet: Yeah.

    ZS: “Why aren’t you happy? Why can’t you just be more like every girl? Why do you always have to try to be a man?”

    AC: It’s not even about that–

    ZS: It’s not even trying to be a man –

    AC: I know, I know.

    ZS: — it’s about trying to feel significant, trying to feel equal, trying to really believe that my purpose in life was more than just be half of something else and deliver the packages, the kids to this, to this individual so they can glorify themselves.

    I lose by the time I’m in my 30s. I fall in love, and I have a career. I’m going to be making less than a man, and I’m going to lose my name to a man.

    AC: And by the way, during your peak earning years you’re also at your most fertile years. So, a lot of women are having babies and not earning during those years, and then they’re going to come back into the workplace not earning anywhere close to what they were before they had kids.

    ZS: And by the time they come back they’re unattractive. ‘Cause they’re breastfeeding some child, I can’t picture them in a bathing suit somewhere. You just go…

    AC: Less job opportunities.

    ZS: Yeah, you go from from being the mistress characters to this sex symbol woman, then you have a baby ’cause you want to take a break and really have a life, and then you come back and you’re a soccer mom.

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