What We Missed

Spain’s conservative Justice Minister is trying to roll back access to abortion. As usual, Spaniards are taking to the streets of Madrid in protest! Check out the video and transcript here and notice how intergenerational the demonstration is.

Westboro Baptist Church picketed a military base Friday, but the protesters were outnumbered by zombies.

Oxford University has changed its rule requiring students to wear ceremonial clothing specific to their assigned gender when taking tests (as far as I can tell from the lousy reporting). Which is good. This line from the Press Association’s story is not so good: “It will mean men will be able to sit tests in skirts and stockings and women will have the option of wearing suits and bow ties.” This is about real discrimination you know. Kinda missing the point there.

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Born and raised on the mean streets of New York City’s Upper West Side, Katie Halper is a comic, writer, blogger, satirist and filmmaker based in New York. Katie graduated from The Dalton School (where she teaches history) and Wesleyan University (where she learned that labels are for jars.) A director of Living Liberally and co-founder/performer in Laughing Liberally, Katie has performed at Town Hall, Symphony Space, The Culture Project, D.C. Comedy Festival, all five Netroots Nations, and The Nation Magazine Cruise, where she made Howard Dean laugh! and has appeared with Lizz Winstead, Markos Moulitsas, The Yes Men, Cynthia Nixon and Jim Hightower. Her writing and videos have appeared in The New York Times, Comedy Central, The Nation Magazine, Gawker, Nerve, Jezebel, the Huffington Post, Alternet and Katie has been featured in/on NY Magazine, LA Times, In These Times, Gawker,Jezebel, MSNBC, Air America, GritTV, the Alan Colmes Show, Sirius radio (which hung up on her once) and the National Review, which called Katie “cute and some what brainy.” Katie co-produced Tim Robbins’s film Embedded, (Venice Film Festival, Sundance Channel); Estela Bravo’s Free to Fly (Havana Film Festival, LA Latino Film Festival); was outreach director for The Take, Naomi Klein/Avi Lewis documentary about Argentine workers (Toronto & Venice Film Festivals, Film Forum); co-directed New Yorkers Remember the Spanish Civil War, a video for Museum of the City of NY exhibit, and wrote/directed viral satiric videos including Jews/ Women/ Gays for McCain.

Katie is a writer, comedian, filmmaker, and New Yorker.

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  • unequivocal

    This line from the Press Association’s story is not so good: “It will mean men will be able to sit tests in skirts and stockings and women will have the option of wearing suits and bow ties.”

    From reading the article though it looks like this is basically what it will mean; it doesn’t look like they are changing the dress code itself, just redefining its application. The choices remain either:

    A dark suit, dark shoes, and a white shirt and bow tie under all black gowns; or
    A dark skirt or trousers, a white blouse, black stockings and shoes, and a black ribbon tied in a bow at the neck.

    So, really, by removing the gendered aspect of the code, Oxford really is saying that men will be able to sit tests in skirts and stockings (or suits and bow ties) and women will be able to sit tests in suits and bow ties (or skirts and stockings). This didn’t read as a slippery-slope style “zomg, now men could conceivably wear high heels, fishnets and falsies, the horror!” exaggeration, but rather as a pretty clear layout of precisely what the new dress code entails.