Weekly Feminist Reader

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How about that totally unchanging definition of marriage, eh? (Click here for larger image. Via the Angry Black Woman)

Jaclyn Friedman has a new column of unsolicited sex tips at GOOD. First up: some advice for Bristol Palin.

Broadening the conversation about domestic violence at Racialicious.

Flavia breaks down some stats from the first UN Women report released this week.

How cool was the last NASA space shuttle launch?

Lots of good posts on sexism in the atheist/skeptical community sparked by Richard Dawkins’ response to Rebecca Watson’s mild suggestion that men shouldn’t make unsolicited sexual advances to women in elevators.

Ever wonder what a year’s worth of makeup looks like? (Eww!)

Some notes for reporters covering rape cases in response to this article on the Jamie Leigh Jones case.

Four Muslim women in the U.S. discuss radicalization.

History is made: Red blood shown in an American menstrual pad commercial.

Thousands of Californian inmates have joined in solidarity to support the Pelican Bay prison hunger strike.

What country would win the gender equality World Cup? (Spoiler alert: not the U.S.)

What have you been reading/writing this week?

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12 Comments

  1. Posted July 10, 2011 at 2:09 pm | Permalink

    My Planned Parenthood is a Mental Health Hookup (TW for rape and PTSD) — My contribution to a blog carnival about experiences with Planned Parenthood.

    Thoughts on a Word: Fit — Examining idea about body image and what it means to be “fit.”

    Spread ‘Em! — The next installment of my chair yoga series and a small rant about dress shoes.

  2. Posted July 10, 2011 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

    A post in response to Lisa Bloom’s “How to Talk to Girls” over at mamafeminista.com

  3. Posted July 10, 2011 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

    It is fantastic to see the post at Racialicious about the “non-traditional” victims/perpetrators – too often these individuals are not acknowledged or taken seriously. However, I think the post gets into some pretty dangerous territory with made-up terms like “intimate terrorism” and “situational partner violence”. The fact of the matter is, these things are approximately as real as so-called “battered woman’s syndrome”. By creating and utilizing language like this, it only serves to Other/ostracize the very people who are suffering, quite clearly, from domestic violence. By re-writing the language, we build a (language-based, but VERY real) barrier to services from domestic violence agencies, law enforcement, legal recourse, and other supportive networks. It also sets the stage for creating a hierarchy of circumstances… one is more severe than the other, because one is more real; is given more legal, social, and personal validity.

    Let’s get it straight: domestic violence is domestic violence. No matter who you are.

  4. Posted July 10, 2011 at 9:32 pm | Permalink

    This piece in the New York Times on a couple that left ultra-conservative Christian views of contraception: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/09/us/09beliefs.html

  5. Posted July 10, 2011 at 10:46 pm | Permalink

    Here is a list of posts related to what has become the “Dawkins Comment” discussion but that was going along quite well before he chimed in: http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2011/07/elevators_and_privilege_a_lett.php

    • Posted July 11, 2011 at 9:27 am | Permalink

      Indeed, this discussion was going strong before Dawkins put his two cents in. There are many others whose reactions to Watson’s post are far more heinous than Dawkins’ “this-is-a-non-issue-compared-to-other-women’s-suffering-in-the-world” response. He just happens to have his fame attached to his privileged ignorance.

      (Also, my apologies for accidentally flagging Greg L.’s post. I clicked that when I was aiming for ‘Reply’.)

    • Posted July 11, 2011 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for providing that great list of other posts on the topic, Greg!

  6. Posted July 11, 2011 at 1:49 am | Permalink

    That Jaclyn Friedman article’s opening paragraphs were sickeningly patronizing.

    “Dear Bristol,

    I so wish you and I could have this conversation on a long girls’ night in. You’d get a babysitter for Tripp, I’d bring the popcorn, and we’d hang in our pajamas and watch Heathers. Afterwards, we’d paint each other’s toenails, and I’d tell you how great your chin looks. And then, when we were both feeling relaxed and expansive and had built some kind of trust, I’d tell you this:

    I’m worried about you, girl.”

    Really? REALLY? Besides being quite late to the party, Friedman says nothing new about why she wants to define Bristol’s experiences for her. She just manages to repackage the argument in an incredibly condescending way.

  7. Posted July 11, 2011 at 4:24 am | Permalink

    I tried to show my friend the image by linking it to her on Facebook chat and got the following message:

    “This message contains blocked content that has previously been flagged as abusive or spammy. Let us know if you think this is an error.”

    Interesting…

  8. Posted July 11, 2011 at 4:32 am | Permalink

    I really loved that diagram about marriage and the interview with the feminist Hulk. This is just a quick comment re: advertising on this site — there’s an ad displaying currently which reads “Why women love jerks: find out why women love jerks and nice guys lose out every time.” I find that this embodies card board cut out of a stereotype of women and doesn’t seem likely to lead to healthy relationship advice. If you have any control over which ads are displayed, I would really appreciate it if this one were taken down.

  9. Posted July 11, 2011 at 8:34 am | Permalink

    Something else that changed. Back in the day marriage didnt require a goverment stamp and approval. Why does it now?

  10. Posted July 11, 2011 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

    *Potential triggers* Yet another comment, alas, on the rape culture and victim blaming, brought to you by Richard Dawkins. My take on it.

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