This is what the rape dialogue looks like

four-panel comic titled “the quid bro quo”. a dude holds up his finger and declares, “women should probably not be raped!” and then looks around with his hands on his hips, in wide-eyed and grinning pride. when there’s no reaction, he looks skeptical & confused and says, “…where’s my cookie?”

Image: four-panel comic titled “the quid bro quo”. a dude holds up his finger and declares, “women should probably not be raped!” and then looks around with his hands on his hips, in wide-eyed and grinning pride. when there’s no reaction, he looks skeptical & confused and says, “…where’s my cookie?””

With all the recent buzz about rape versus “forcible” rape lately, this comic seemed particularly appropriate.

Via Colorlines Tumblr

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  • http://cabaretic.blogspot.com nazza

    Ah, yes, nothing like the power of a forced concession.

  • http://feministing.com/members/libdevil/ Nick

    tagged Humor, Rape.

    Not a combination I expect to see often, but I think it works in this case.

  • http://feministing.com/members/caveneil/ Neil

    If I understand it correctly, the point of this comic seems to be that white men are saying that some rapes are worse than others, and that is a ridiculous thing to say. Not only is it ridiculous, the comic implies, but it is tantamount to saying that those rapes that are not the worst thing ever deserve only mild condemnation, if any.

    I find the sentiment a little dishonest. All rapes are not created equal, and in general forcible rapes strike me as more serious crimes than at least some class of statutory rapes like otherwise consensual sex between a sixteen year old girl and her nineteen year old boyfriend. However, other statutory rapes might not fit in that category, where the age difference is generational and there are also relationship power imbalances.

    As far as the merits of legislation that would take these distinctions into account when considering government funding for abortions that result from criminalized sexual intercourse, I would say they are dubious and that the legislation was proposed to inflame debate.

    • http://feministing.com/members/treefinger/ Candice

      No, the point of the comic is that the guy seems to think that acknowledging rape is bad should be enough for everyone to congratulate him on being a great person, ie.: give him a cookie. It’s such a fundamental thing that everyone should think, though, that it doesn’t really deserve any reward.

      The thing Miriam brought up about forcible rape debates is relevant-ish because the people that discuss it think that by saying being Napoli’d is horrible for women, they can get away with saying women impregnated by statutory or date rape should be barred from having abortions using government financial assistance (as recent bills suggested, before the #dearJohn campaign and other people got them to take the language out of the bills).

      The comic itself doesn’t involve any suggestions about whether a hierarchy of different sorts of rape is right or wrong.

      • http://feministing.com/members/azure156/ Jenny Gonzalez-Blitz

        That’s how I took it. It reminds me of a certain sort of guy(more common back in my art school days) who parrots all the “correct” feminist rhetoric and then gets perplexed when it doesn’t automatically make women sleep with him.

  • http://feministing.com/members/selfawarenessweek/ A.J.

    Hi, long-time reader, first-time poster.

    I think it is worth pointing out that this comic is actually just four panels of a larger, two-part comic by Ken Dahl about discussions of sexism on the internet.

    The first part can be found here: http://www.gabbysplayhouse.com/?p=1444
    The second part, which includes “The Quid Bro Quo” bit, can be found here: http://www.gabbysplayhouse.com/?p=1457

  • unequivocal

    I don’t know. Do we agree that yes, in general, rape culture exists and is considered to be the accepted norm?

    Yes? Then frankly, I think that anyone who disagrees with that sentiment is, in fact, stepping up to a position of higher morality, and that that deserves a degree of recognition.

    Is it enough? Of course not.

    But comics like this seem to make it out to be nothing, and that doesn’t seem quite right either.