This is what the rape dialogue looks like

four-panel comic titled “the quid bro quo”. a dude holds up his finger and declares, “women should probably not be raped!” and then looks around with his hands on his hips, in wide-eyed and grinning pride. when there’s no reaction, he looks skeptical & confused and says, “…where’s my cookie?”

Image: four-panel comic titled “the quid bro quo”. a dude holds up his finger and declares, “women should probably not be raped!” and then looks around with his hands on his hips, in wide-eyed and grinning pride. when there’s no reaction, he looks skeptical & confused and says, “…where’s my cookie?””

With all the recent buzz about rape versus “forcible” rape lately, this comic seemed particularly appropriate.

Via Colorlines Tumblr

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image via RT

The sexual violence of the CIA torture program

This week’s Senate report reveals gruesome and grisly details about the way the CIA used torture after 9/11. While the revelations are sparking outrage and disgust, few people are making the important and disturbing point that the regimented, systemized, and dehumanizing abuse actually included sexual violence and rape.

While organizations like Human Rights Watch and Center for Constitutional Rights have been documenting and even filing suit against he abuses that occurred under CIA watch for over a decade, a Senate report released on Tuesday confirms that the CIA did indeed engage in torture — and lied about it.

The CIA doesn’t call this torture “torture,” opting instead for the euphemism of “enhanced interrogation techniques.” But ...

This week’s Senate report reveals gruesome and grisly details about the way the CIA used torture after 9/11. While the revelations are sparking outrage and disgust, few people are making the important and disturbing point that ...

women's soccer plays

Male viewer writes letter to the editor explaining why women can’t play soccer

This weekend, England’s women’s soccer team played Germany in an historic match at Wembly national stadium. As the Independent reports, “It was the first standalone game for women at the home of football, drew a record crowd of 46,000, was shown live in TV coverage on the BBC, and introduced a generation of young girls to the idea of the women’s team being treated the same as the men for the first time.” 

After the game, one male viewer, David Hickey, wrote a letter to the editor asking why it was aired when women’s soccer clearly doesn’t compare to the men’s game. “Women can’t play football,” he wrote. “They don’t even know the basic rules.” Here’s his full message:

 

As ...

This weekend, England’s women’s soccer team played Germany in an historic match at Wembly national stadium. As the Independent reports, “It was the first standalone game for women at the home of football, drew a ...