Weekly Feminist Reader


via Lipstick Feminists

Daisy Hernandez reviews The Kids Are All Right.

A woman recently lost her lawsuit against Girls Gone Wild.

The Washington Post gives anti-gay bigot William Donohue space to claim that the real crisis in the Catholic church isn’t sexual abuse, it’s homosexuality.

Melissa Harris-Lacewell on Shirley Sherrod, race-baiting, and history repeating.

The women of ComiCon.

On True Blood and violence against women.

Is your manicure toxic?

A bus driver in Texas claims he was fired after he refused to transport a woman to Planned Parenthood. Transportation: the next frontier in anti-choice “conscience clauses”?

Marisa Meltzer reminisces about Daria and asks where all the snarky teen girl characters in pop culture have gone.

What have you been reading/writing this week?

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13 Comments

  1. Posted July 26, 2010 at 12:11 am | Permalink

    It’s hard to imagine 11 sane people deciding that merely standing around while other women are getting filmed and getting your shirt pulled up involuntarily despite saying ‘no, no’ constitutes implied consent. Implied anything goes out the window because here you have something explicit. There must be something more to this story. What was the jury’s real reasoning?

    • Posted July 26, 2010 at 9:23 pm | Permalink

      I think their reasoning was that the location had a bunch of signs up saying “there’s live filming here, if you enter, you are consenting to be filmed by Girls Gone Wild.” Meanwhile, GGW had nothing to do with the shirt-pulling-up; that was another woman who was there and not affiliated with them. I’m not sure I really agree with this, but I can at least see it as a believable possibility – if I agree to be filmed, and then while I’m being filmed, a third party comes on-camera and attacks me, I can see the logic in blaming the third party rather than the camera crew. It would be very scummy of them to then release that tape… but I’m not sure it should be illegal.

      What I want to know is this: why is nobody bringing up that other woman’s responsibility in this? I understand that GGW are scum and we hate them, etc, but why are we giving the second woman a free pass on a sexual assault? I’ve yet to see one person mention that she is at least partly to blame since she, you know, sexually assaulted someone on camera.

  2. Posted July 26, 2010 at 12:41 am | Permalink

    On the lighter side, Fred Phelps decides to protest Comicon. (I almost want to know why). Anyway, they faced the best counter protest EV4R!

  3. Posted July 26, 2010 at 12:48 am | Permalink

    On living with chronic illness and all the joys that come with it:
    http://onefemalegaze.wordpress.com/2010/03/09/ra-diaries-owww-please-dont-touch-me/
    Taking math as an older student, and dealing with bro instructors and internalized sexism:
    http://onefemalegaze.wordpress.com/2010/04/02/mathochism-bro-privilege/
    http://onefemalegaze.wordpress.com/2010/03/02/mathochism-im-a-woman/

  4. Posted July 26, 2010 at 1:04 am | Permalink

    Too bad this Texas asshole doesn’t have to deal with the crazy mothers who take public transportation in Minneapolis–if he did, he’d drive them to hell just to get them off the goddamned bus.

    • Posted July 26, 2010 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

      im not sure what youre implying with the phrase “crazy mothers” but it is, at the least, ablelist. are the “mothers” here women with children (and therefore are in that special category of people with minors that are notorious for making public space so unbearable. /sarcasm) or mothers, as in mother-effers.

  5. Posted July 26, 2010 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    Maybe the feminists saying and writing they hate men, while being accepted in the feminist movement as leading figures and galeons figures of feminism gave people that idea?

    • Posted July 26, 2010 at 2:05 pm | Permalink

      Some feminists hate men, that’s true. But hell, some bakers hate men, that doesn’t mean you have to be a misandrist to appreciate the relationship between high protein flour and yeast. It may be true that feminism is going to attract more people who hate men than baking, but the thing is that feminists, like everyone else, are people, each with their individual variants on how to be brilliant and how to be stupid.

  6. Posted July 26, 2010 at 10:15 am | Permalink

    Be a Biographer for Sexually Exploited Women
    The contest invites designers to creatively convey the stories of the survivors in order to raise awareness about the social, political, and economic conditions that contribute to the exploitation of millions of women and girls each year.

    Funds for Sexual Assault Prevention and Victim’s Services Cut in NYC
    When the New York City Council decided which programs would stay, and which programs were expendable, in the new city budget, sexual assault prevention and victim’s services was left out entirely.

    The Fatal Beauty of Tajooj
    Suzanne Hilal, a Sudanese-English artist whose work spans a range of mediums including printmaking, pastels, and ink, is known for the way her works are inspired by Sudanese folktales and reflects the country’s culture and history.

    Despicable Me
    While the film neglects one of my cardinal rules of feminist filmmaking—having positive female role models—it did call into question traditional roles of masculinity, especially in response to parenthood.

  7. Posted July 26, 2010 at 10:42 am | Permalink

    I’m glad too see a bunch dissenting opinions in the comments of the True Blood post. The author cherry picks and re-frames several scenes from the show to make her point. Absolutely there is violence against women on that show, probably more than against men overall though that trend doesn’t fall solely on Alan Ball’s shoulders, but True Blood is simply violent. The current storyline with one female character’s kidnapping and possible rape is after an extended sequence of a male character’s kidnapping and prolonged captivity last season as well as another male character’s kidnapping an torture just a few episodes ago. It’s also really problematic to re-frame enthusiastic consent as rape because the sex is too violent for the writer

    The show is certainly questionable, in it’s politics as well as it’s quality, but the linked article seems almost a deliberate misrepresentation. It’s easy to make something look awful by re-contextualizing it, but you can to that with anything.

  8. Posted July 26, 2010 at 11:50 am | Permalink

    Saw the film. Loved it.

    Angelina Jolie transforms Hollywood
    The significance of Salt

  9. Posted July 26, 2010 at 5:15 pm | Permalink

    Nice photo!

  10. Posted July 26, 2010 at 7:28 pm | Permalink

    This article from AOL news tells about two blind parents who got their baby back from state custody. Please read.

    http://www.parentdish.com/2010/07/23/blind-couple-reunited-with-baby-taken-away-by-state/?icid=main|main|dl3|link1|http%3A%2F%2Fwww.parentdish.com%2F2010%2F07%2F23%2Fblind-couple-reunited-with-baby-taken-away-by-state%2F

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