White House list of free preventative services won’t include birth control

The list should be released today, and the Wall Street Journal says it won’t include birth control. This list is part of the new health care overhaul, as bits and pieces go into effect starting now.

The Obama administration on Wednesday will unveil new rules specifying which preventive health services will be free to consumers under the new health law.
Cancer screenings, including mammograms and colonoscopies, as well as obesity prevention services, immunizations, blood pressure screenings and tobacco cessation services are among those that will be available to consumers without a copayment or other direct costs for consumers on new health plans after Sept. 23.
Birth control will not qualify as preventive under these regulations. The Planned Parenthood Federation of America is pushing for it to be included in a separate set of regulations on women’s health expected to come out in the coming months.

To ensure access to birth control for everyone who wants it, including it as a preventative service would be key. The fight on this is definitely not over, as reproductive rights and justice groups gear up to push the White House on this issue.

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8 Comments

  1. Liz
    Posted July 14, 2010 at 11:33 am | Permalink

    Is someone making the “if you make birth control less expensive then orgies and sex cults are going to break out immediately!” argument?…cause that’s usually my favorite part…

  2. smiley
    Posted July 14, 2010 at 4:55 pm | Permalink

    Quick question: is pregnancy actually a disease?
    I’m asking because over here, in Switzerland, some feminists were offended when a law was proposed to introduce Maternity Insurance; insurance against something positive?! Insurance against cancer, accidents, disease and unemployment, yes, but against pregnancy?
    The law passed. But they probably had a point. No?

  3. adag87
    Posted July 14, 2010 at 5:43 pm | Permalink

    I don’t think making birth control a preventative service is making pregnancy a disease. Pregnancy, child birth and (especially) raising a child in today’s world can all be pretty expensive endeavors. If people don’t want to have children or go through the stresses that pregnancy puts on the body, then frankly I think “preventative” is just as good a word as any.
    Also maternity insurance makes sense to me. the health care services a typical woman receives when pregnant can get expensive if she doesn’t have insurance.

  4. Emily
    Posted July 14, 2010 at 8:08 pm | Permalink

    That’s a good point if it’s lumped as a disease. But pregnancy is an extremely costly health service and the reality is, about half are unplanned so I think it defiantly belongs under this preventative health care. Also, insurance is usually for bad things but I don’t see why it necessarily has to be so. I’m sure the feminists had a point other than definition problems, but if their only issue was the associations with insurance being for negative things, I really think that’s short-sighted and that the emphasis should be pro-life improving changes at the expense of thinking about a definition or event differently than we are accustom to.

  5. TD
    Posted July 14, 2010 at 10:10 pm | Permalink

    If we’re talking birth control are we looking at condoms, or oral contraceptives (for simplicity sake). Because as far as prevention goes, condoms are much more applicable, yet most of the discussion of birth control and insurance reform has revolved entirely around oral contraceptives.

  6. sparky17
    Posted July 14, 2010 at 11:58 pm | Permalink

    It isn’t calling pregnancy a disease, but if you don’t want to be a mother at any moment then birth control is a nessecary preventive measure. Also, pregnancy and parenthood are things that, at least in the US, effect women disproportionately, so that often other things have to be put on hold if you want to be a mother but it isn’t true if you become a father. Maybe if we were more mom-friendly then the need for free birth control just to give us a fighting chance wouldn’t be so important.

  7. ChoirGrrl
    Posted July 15, 2010 at 10:29 am | Permalink

    Babies = expensive.
    Birth control = cheap.
    What is so hard to understand about this?

  8. Posted July 26, 2010 at 1:59 am | Permalink

    I frankly do not blame Obama for this. I blame the Republicans, the conservatives, and their unwillingness to compromise. They kept on demanding concessions. Obama, trying to reach his hand out, made them. Then the Republican dog bit the hand anyway.

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