Queen Latifah’s unfortunate choice of words on Chris Brown: “We can’t keep beating him up”

This is the Queen Latifah I know, love, and grew up with:

This is not [on Chris Brown]:

The guy is a young guy and he made a big mistake and he needs to bounce back from that. And he needs an opportunity for a second chance…We can’t condemn that kid. He’s a kid and he needs to correct the mistake for the future, not live in the past…He needs to be forgiven. Enough already. We can’t keep beating him up.

So much for unity, huh? What happened to putting “his ass in handcuffs” and a “man don’t really love you if he hits you”?

Join the Conversation

  • ilikebubbles

    so what is the right thing to do as a feminist? i vowed to stop listening to his music after what he did. but after his apology, i can’t help but feel bad for his career. but i also feel like it was all a plot to get women to forgive him. what do other feminists think?

  • makncheese

    I think she’s right. He’s paid a HUGE price for it. How much more does he need to pay? Whats the price you’re asking from him? His entire career?

  • Comrade Kevin

    I think sometimes celebrities feel a need to cover for each other, even when they’ve done totally reprehensible things. See: Roman Polanski.

  • Bridgette

    Yes, we CAN keep beating up on him, and we should keep beating up on him. We should keep beating up on any one who believes that it is alright to hit someone because you are angry. It does not matter who is the abuser- man or woman, and it does not matter who the abused is- man or woman. Abusing anyone is wrong. Unfortunately, most abusers never learn to not abuse. Instead, they continue to abuse as they go from one relationship to the next.
    While we are at it, we should remember that women do abuse men, women abuse women, and men abuse men in relationships too. Abuse is wrong, period.

  • Chris

    @ilikebubbles: “but after his apology, i can’t help but feel bad for his career. but i also feel like it was all a plot to get women to forgive him. what do other feminists think?”
    It’s been a plot since day one. I’m sure he’s got it rationalized somehow, but I don’t care about his career.
    @makncheese “I think she’s right. He’s paid a HUGE price for it. How much more does he need to pay? Whats the price you’re asking from him? His entire career?”
    YES. Why is it not worth his career as a pop singer? Why are you jumping over all abused women to prop him back up? What do you owe him? Anyone who claims that we’re obliged to forgive everyone is perpetuating a culture of abuse.
    @Bridgette: Absolutely. If there’s nothing keeping it from happening again but record sales, he’ll just pay off the woman better and keep the bruising away from the face.

  • b

    Is it really necessary to keep beating up on HIM? I mean isn’t it possible to have a discussion about violence against women that doesn’t involve demonizing the perpetrator? Yes, we need to hold him accountable for his actions, and yes, we must make sure that topic remains open, but aren’t we doing further damage by emphasizing Chris Brown’s violence rather than focusing on our culture of violence. Queen Latifah is not excusing his actions or going back on her previous morals. She is merely asking us to allow Chris Brown to find redemption which is a private process. We can choose to stop listening to his music, but we can’t presume to know whether or not he has changed and we can’t use him as the poster-child for all violence against women. Because he is not all men, or even all abusers.

  • Black Cherry

    I am so sick of people sympathizing with men who beat their girlfriends/wives.
    Which reminds me, if I have to hear another person say that Charlie Sheen “needs help” I’m gonna scream.

  • Sigmund

    Honestly, I’m shocked to see this kind of response on Feministing. He’s paid a “huge” price for it? What, exactly, is that? He’s had to put up with criticism for it? Please. If anyone, Rihanna paid the huge price: getting beaten bloody by a person she trusted.
    If police hadn’t intervened, he could have easily killed her. He may never have his old life back, because there’s no going back from what he did. There’s no “magic price” to pay when you’re an abuser.

  • Sigmund

    Ugh. Abuse is never okay, and it’s entirely possible that Chris Brown may never *get* his old life back. Calling him a “kid” is irrelevant: if he had killed Rihanna, would people still try to excuse his behavior? Saying that he deserves a “second chance” is living in denial. This is the kind of attitude that allows abusers to continue the cycle.

  • xocoatl

    domestic violence is reprehensible.
    I’m a little hurt and upset that the suggested solution to black domestic violence is for an already dominant white society to “put his ass in handcuffs.”
    the incarceration rate of young black men in prison is also reprehensible. Not to mention the role models presented to young black men. And that black people suffer higher rates of domestic abuse. Many repeat that abuse.
    I feel you on the “chris brown did a bad thing” level. For real. Hitting Rihanna was not okay.
    In order to help with that problem, I think we should complicate the narrative of what’s happening here away from the “innocent & okay versus guilty & prison-bound” dichotomy.
    I think we’re all hurting from this episode, but reacting with a demand for vengeance is just more pain.
    My question for the feministing community is this: how can we make this moment a constructive one? How do we address this issue in a way that alleviates rather than reintroduces violence?

  • TabloidScully

    Oh, yes. POOR Chris Brown! I mean, all he did was beat his girlfriend senseless. And look how we’re punishing him for it–low album sales (never mind that his music has always SUCKED anyway) and the cancellation of multiple endorsement deals (which, given that his music was terrible, he didn’t deserve). I love how we’re supposed to feel bad for him. Rihanna isn’t the victim; he is because he’s actually having to face the consequences for his actions.
    I really just cannot wrap my mind around people who go to bat for the likes of Chris Brown and Roman Polanski. Particularly when their crimes have been against women, I can’t understand any self-respecting Feminist identifying with the idea that “poor Chris Brown just needs a break.”

  • xocoatl

    “We should keep beating up on any one who believes that it is alright to hit someone because you are angry.” – seems like a bit of a contradiction
    “It does not matter who is the abuser- man or woman, and it does not matter who the abused is- man or woman. Abusing anyone is wrong.”
    -just how much do you want to beat up on Chris brown that makes it okay?

  • Hypatia

    I’m somewhat uncomfortable with the labeling I see going on here. He abused so he’s an abuser forever? He did something terrible, and so he will always remain a terrible person? We should assume that?
    I grew up in a household where there was domestic violence. I am instinctively wary people who dismiss serious abuse as just a little dispute between a couple that can and should be fixed and forgiven. But as a feminist, I am also wary of generalization, dichotomies, and a closed mind. Don’t forget, but maybe forgive, with reservations.

  • Jessica Lee

    What a disappointment from Queen Latifah. I’ve always admired her as a strong, outspoken woman, but this comment really upsets me.
    She needs to re-listen to “U.N.I.T.Y.” a few more times.

  • Max

    It is not ok to hit people, especially partners. If only there was a magic wand to make abusive people non-abusive, it would out sell the ipad on opening day, maybe even out sell Avatar. Who knows? All I know is that participating in a society that has public disclosure about abuse is a critical way in which society expresses dislike for abusive behavoir. Therefore, the silence of stopping talk about it seems akin to condoning it happening again in the future. Why live in the past when there are more partners, more prey?
    Public information about abusers and public feedback about how people feel about them is vital.

  • niivala

    Probation and six months community service – equals punishment?
    That, and being treated like a star and being defended by all sorts of people who should know better, like Queen Latifah? How, and in what way does this tiny slap on the wrist equate to “punishment”?
    All Chris Brown might ever learn from that is to keep the abuse more secret. The legions of people defending him and attacking Rihanna is totally disgusting.

  • Brittany

    I’m confused here. So because he’s black, he SHOULDN’T be in handcuffs because society is dominated by white people?
    If it was a white man, should he be in handcuffs?
    An abuser of any color deserves to be in prison, regardless of rage.

  • Brittany

    Er, I meant race, not rage.

  • Cassius

    Whatever happened to forgiveness? Screaming for his blood is not very christian. After the incident he was wrunged through the press and criticized. Why is there so much anger about the fact that people do not keep criticizing him and keep being angry at him, but move on? Is it wrong for Latifah to not put on the one track record of Man Bad? I have been a bit violent in school and outside school occasionally when I was younger, not with girls, but with guys and others have been too. Imagine if all those guys would have been shunned by society at large denied a second chance because they hit somebody.
    I guess what I am asking is what do you want to see happening to Chris Brown? You want him to end up in jail, you want him to live out the rest of his life shunned by society like a child rapist, what?

  • Bridgette

    I should have been clearer in my language. Since no one is actively hitting on Chris Brown, I did not mean it in a literal since, but in a social/verbal sense as I am pretty sure everyone else is talking about him.

  • Cassius

    I did not see any complaints about people coming forward for Stanley Williams on this site and he murdered and entire family. But I guess Asians are not as important. Many posters were probably off on some other site posting on how he should not be executed because he wrote childrens books. I felt similiarly, but I oppose capital punishment in general.
    Also when a young guy beats up another man its bad, he is being scolded for it, but also expected to move on in his life and change his ways as he matures. Nobody demands that he pays for the rest of his life for it.
    In that respect we feminists, yes feminists on here too, are sexist. Despite of what many claim, that violence is always wrong which it is, a young guy beating up another young guy does not trigger those strong emotions in the woman who display the outrage about what Chris did. Now they want society to tream him the way a child rapist would be treated, shunned by everybody for life, while the article would not even have made it on this particular site if chris brown had used his martial arts on a guy of Riannas age.

  • daveNYC

    ” I mean isn’t it possible to have a discussion about violence against women that doesn’t involve demonizing the perpetrator?”
    You mean the criminal who shoved her head against the passenger window, then punched her repeatedly in the face with his right hand, causing her mouth to fill with blood and blood to splatter all ovr her clothing and the interior of the vehicle?
    Oh yeah, I say we demonize the everliving fuck out of him.

  • makncheese

    I’m certainly no apologist for Brown. I completely GET the whole violence issue. I think everyone agrees on that.
    What I want to know is…what is the price you want him to pay? Isn’t it entirely possible that what he’s been through is enough to change his life completely? (and yes…I get that Rhianna was beaten, and that his public shaming might not, in your POV, equate to her lifetime memory of it…)
    So what is the price you really want him to pay? How much jail time did you want him to serve? What was the monetary damage you think is “reasonable”…or is there no redemption for him?
    Should he become a lifelong posterchild for abusers everywhere? Should his career and creative life be completely ruined forever because of it?

  • makncheese

    That’s what I was thinking.

  • katemoore

    So what, Charlie Sheen instead needs to be left alone unhelped so he can continue to be an asshole? This sounds like the same logic people use to argue for the death penalty.

  • makncheese

    @chris said “YES. Why is it not worth his career as a pop singer? Why are you jumping over all abused women to prop him back up? What do you owe him? Anyone who claims that we’re obliged to forgive everyone is perpetuating a culture of abuse.”
    How about not personally attacking people for their POV?
    There are going to be differing opinions as to what constitutes justice in this situation, but to infer that I’m “JUMPING ALL OVER ABUSED WOMEN” is just complete and utter bullcrap. Its abso-fucking-LUTELY bullshit and you know it.
    I’m not jumping all over abused women, and I owe him nothing. You make it sound like I’m some sort of apologist for him, or all the men who abuse women in the entire world. The last thing I’m doing is suggesting that we forgive everyone.
    I just don’t see the purpose of making the rest of his life some kind of hell because of this. Maybe you can’t forgive him, but I can. Too bad for you.

  • Tia

    I see the situation both ways.
    Chris Brown beat his girlfriend. Beat her. Could have easily killed her. She will have to live every day with that, the memories, the trauma, the fear, the paranoia it can happen again, and everything else that comes with being abused. Nothing can change it. Nothing can erase it.
    And I don’t think he deserves forgiveness. I don’t think he deserves to have everyone say, “okay, that’s enough, we’re done hating you now. Try not to beat the hell out of the next person you date, okay?” I don’t think he deserves his career back. I don’t think he deserves to have his name cleared. I don’t think he deserves to wake up a single day in his life without thinking about the damage of what he’s done.
    But that doesn’t mean he can’t try to earn his way back up in the world. He should be able to get into deep therapy, and find ways to not be the man that beat his girlfriend, but the man who found a way to be better than he was.

  • CoronerCountess

    Okay, bear with me for a second, because this might ramble just a bit, but there is a point relevant to this discussion.
    One of my favorite movies is “Freeway” (a sort of modern-day re-telling of Little Red Riding Hood, with Reese Witherspoon as Red and Keifer Sutherland as the Wolf, a murderous psycho who preys on female hitchhikers). There’s a point in the movie when Reese’s character turns the tables and holds a gun to his neck, stopping his attempt to slash her with a razor. As he is behind the wheel, she tells him to turn off on a dirt road. She intends to kill him, but before shooting him, she gives him the following speech:
    “Now I know there’s men out there who get all hard thinking about messin’ women up. And, hell, that’s all you ever see on TV. But when a guy goes and tries to do that to someone who never hurt them like you was planning on doing to me, that makes him a criminal first and a sick guy second. It’s like being sick has to take second place to being crooked. And, Bob … you’re crooked. You proved that to me tonight.”
    I thought of this speech when I kept hearing all the misplaced sympathy for Brown. He has issues he needs to work through and for THAT, maybe, he does deserve at least a bit of our sympathy. But, as stated above, he’s proven that he’s “crooked”, that’s he’s capable of an act of violence against someone who trusted him.
    P.S. I am not all suggesting Chris Brown be shot and left for dead on a dirt road. More violence does not rectify a violent situation.

  • Miss Caroline

    A number of these “when will you stop making him suffer for this!?” comments seem to come from concerns as fans. If you’re worried that he’ll no longer be an entertainer or feel guilty because you still really like his music then by all means: keep listening. Continue to enjoy it. That’s unquestionably your choice and it’s up to you to make peace with it. But asking us to stop talking about it? Silencing the outrage surrounding something as tragically common as domestic violence? Frustration towards people who won’t forgive, because you’ve chosen to believe that he’s sincere in his apology?
    He doesn’t need your protection from the consequences of what he’s done. That’s the risk he took when he viciously beat another human being.

  • Honeybee

    I think this is a valid question and we should drop our emotions for a bit to analyze it.
    How much punishment is enough?
    Part of being a liberal/feminist is believing in rehabilitation and fairness. So at what point do we consider he has paid enough? Do we really want to say that if you make one mistake that’s it, your life is over and we’ll never give you another chance? I don’t think so. So there has to be a point, whereby assuming there are no further incidents, he is “forgiven” for it.

  • Honeybee

    Seems the feeling here is “one strike you’re out”.
    What is the list of crimes for which we will never allow the person to be forgiven for?
    Because I’m pretty sure people who commit assault, grand larceny, drug dealing, and even murder, are forgiven eventually in many cases, unless perhaps they are repeat offenders.
    Is it really impossible for someone to commit a crime and not learn from it? That’s exactly what the republicans want everyone to believe, but that’s not what I believe.

  • Sigmund

    There is a huge difference between believing “one strike, you’re out” and recognizing that abuse will have permanent and lasting effects for everyone involved.
    Do I think that abusers should have the chance to learn from their mistakes? Yes. But that does *not* mean they are entitled to the same life they led before committing the abuse. I’m not advocating that abusers be shunned from society like lepers, but claiming that Chris Brown has “paid the price” assumes both that there is some magic price to be paid in order to erase what happened (there isn’t) and that he is entitled to go back to the way things were before.

  • kg

    That just…doesn’t sit right with me. I mean, when we “demonize” people, insist that THEY are evil instead of focusing on the fact that their ACTIONS are evil, we really obscure the situation, I think. These were not the actions of a demon; these were the actions of a human being, a human being who treated another human being heinously. A lot of people, if not all people, are capable of massive violence. I don’t think it does any good to insist that someone who commits an obviously reprehensible act of violence is an unsalvageable monster.
    I find Chris Brown frustrating because I don’t think he understand that there is more he can do to atone for the situation. I think that he believes that feeling really, really bad about it and saying sorry to the world is enough. But I think he needs to be honest in public, and admit that what he did was his fault, and that he could have made the choice not to do it, and that all of us have that choice. That, to me, would signal the real beginning of his “redemption.”

  • kg

    I think that he thinks apologizing should protect him from the consequences. Which is idiotic.
    I’m doubly mad at him for thinking that his “redemptive comeback” should be so soon. A year later, Chris Brown, you’re not very far removed from a really ugly, stomach-churning thing that YOU DID. This is the kind of thing that should make you step out of the spotlight and think about who the hell you are and what kind of a person you want to be, not to cling desperately at fame and hope that everyone who loves your music will tell you you’re not a bad guy. Ugh.

  • Chris

    “Whatever happened to forgiveness? Screaming for his blood is not very christian.”
    Submission to abusers may be “very christian”, but it involves an actual forgiveness to be requested. Brown is not sincere. Appeal to religious mercy is a sad manipulation, that’s between him and God. What we *do* know is that he did not spontaneously break down. He had to practice that song dozens of times before he went on stage. He did not cry every time. He did not have any epiphany.
    “After the incident he was wrunged through the press and criticized. Why is there so much anger about the fact that people do not keep criticizing him and keep being angry at him, but move on?”
    Because people have been suggesting that Rhianna “get over it” from day one. Because his fans’ inability to allow people to get angry TO BEGIN WITH, or inability to allow people to “judge” him is loathsome.
    “Is it wrong for Latifah to not put on the one track record of Man Bad? I have been a bit violent in school and outside school occasionally when I was younger, not with girls, but with guys and others have been too. Imagine if all those guys would have been shunned by society at large denied a second chance because they hit somebody.”
    Social sanctions are necessary to convince people not to be violent to begin with, and not to associate with violent people. People who amuse their domestic partners should not IMMEDIATELY be granted a second chance, they should have to earn it. He’s on a PR mission, first and foremost.
    “I guess what I am asking is what do you want to see happening to Chris Brown? You want him to end up in jail, you want him to live out the rest of his life shunned by society like a child rapist, what?”
    Nice straw attack. He’s already served his time in jail for beating women, but getting out of jail does not absolve him from his non-legal debt to society. Simply not beating women for a year is not enough time for us to be ok with him. Forcing us to accept him as a “good dude who went astray” reflects badly on you, not us.

  • Chris

    “Part of being a liberal/feminist is believing in rehabilitation and fairness. So at what point do we consider he has paid enough?”
    The moment in which he stops trying to atone in public using carefully crafted media ploys would be fine with me.

  • Chris

    “I did not see any complaints about people coming forward for Stanley Williams on this site and he murdered and entire family. But I guess Asians are not as important”
    Huh? Williams was on death row and spent 12 years or so doing the best that he could before execution. He was a shit of a person, but did some good things in his last days.
    What has Brown done? Sung a few songs? Cried some crocodile tears? Continued to sell a ton of albums to the unshakable fanboys and fangirls? It’s not as if he’s actually volunteering for anti-abuse organizations, or making a difference in anyone’s life.

  • Honeybee

    In all fairness I do NOT think he has paid the price… YET. But I do think it is possible for him to have paid it at some point in the future, whereby, if I actually liked his music, which I don’t, I would be ok for him to perform and be successful again.

  • Chris

    “That just…doesn’t sit right with me. I mean, when we “demonize” people, insist that THEY are evil instead of focusing on the fact that their ACTIONS are evil, we really obscure the situation, I think”
    Conversely, focusing on the evils at the act at the expense of the two people involved divorces the situation from any social sanctions, things that may prevent abusers from abusing to begin with. Shifting culture to allow instant, substanceless forgiveness isn’t doing anyone any favors here.
    Even if the abuser is deserving of eventual forgiveness, instantly washing away the sins doesn’t contribute towards a lasting understanding of the consequences of his/her actions.

  • TiernaFeminista

    This post from Womanist Musings has really great ideas for what we should expect from Mr. Brown. It is a fantastic perspective, overall.
    http://www.womanist-musings.com/2010/07/queen-latifah-chris-brown-and.html#more

  • Emily H.

    “Screaming for blood is not very christian.” This isn’t a Christian site! And no one is screaming for blood, but objecting that the punishments for abusing women often amount to a slap on the wrist, and pointing out that abuse is usually a chronic problem, not a single “mistake” that an otherwise nice guy makes. Also, a lot of us think he’s not entitled (no one is) to a multimillion dollar music career and millions of fans, & that losing those things wouldn’t be too high a price to pay for what he did.

  • Jeniann

    This is beyond “it’s been a while and he’s sorry so let’s forgive him”.
    In particular, here’s why I think Chris is still fair game:
    1. He started back up with a new album within months of him horribly abusing Rihanna. He did the press tour, the singles, the music videos, the whole deal. So Rihanna didn’t even get a year of her abuser laying low.
    2. He talked about the incident and how “sorry” he was the entire time he was promoting said album. But it was all half-hearted and some of his comments, like about how his single was about how sorry he was and that he sent it to Rihanna and it made her cry, were really inappropriate.
    3. He has both in private and on his twitter account whined about how it wasn’t that big of a deal and complained that more people should be buying his music.
    4. He did not have to serve and jail time which made it even easier for him to “get back on the horse” after his arrest.
    Unrelated to the abuse, but relevant to his public image: his “tribute” to Michael Jackson that was self-serving. He did not make it about the dead man he was honoring but about himself.
    If Chris went away from the media for two years and spent that time building houses for the poor or something similar (I don’t know if I’d want him volunteering at a domestic violence shelter because abuse survivors might not like a famous abuser being around) and donated some of his money to help abused women and children without courting the press, I think we all might be more inclined to forgive him.
    But that’s not going to happen; he’s too selfish. Beyond his abuse, his apologies have been self-serving. It’s like how BP is “making it right” in the ads their P.R. guys pay big money to run on TV, when that money should be going to actually doing something to make it right and trying to rescue animals instead of their public image.
    Though I’m perfectly willing to admit that Charlie Sheen has gotten off much easier and Mel Gibson probably will too. But Chris is not being treated unfairly because he’s Black; he’s being treated like he should be. Charlie and Mel are just getting away with things in the court of public opinion because they’re White. In a more fair world they would all be in the same boat as Chris Brown. It’s a double edged sword. Because of prevailing attitudes about women many Americans are inclined to give abusers who’s careers they like a pass. Chris Brown isn’t getting the same kind of pass (except with his fans) because he’s a Black man and his behavior fits into the negative stereotype many in White America has in regards to Black men. So maybe his race is preventing him from getting that pass, but nobody should be getting it at all.

  • TabloidScully

    Here’s the problem with the logic you posit, and the rhetoric of people (like Latifah, in this instance) who are “defending” him.
    WE, the general public, are NOT punishing or persecuting him, contrary to what his supporters might suggest. If you look at it, the issues that Brown is complaining about can easily be attributable to other things.
    For example, poor album sales after the assault on Rihanna. Perhaps his actions caused some of his fans to decide not to buy his music, but by and large, don’t discount the fact that Brown has not, nor likely will he ever be, a best-selling artist competing with, say, Madonna or Prince. His music is trite, unoriginal and (as I thought even BEFORE he decided to get slap-happy on Rihanna) not particularly good. Not to mention that, in this shit economy, I don’t have $16.99 to spend on a CD that may have one tune worth listening to.
    And as far as the cancellation of his endorsement deals? That’s pretty routine in the wake of a celebrity scandal. Speaking of which, if you want to talk someone being unfairly punished, let’s talk about Tiger Woods. That guy’s career is probably over due to his multiple, extra-marital affairs. And while sleeping around makes him a lousy guy to be married to, I think for him to be so penalized over it (especially after becoming one of the world’s most visible male victims of domestic violence, potentially) deserves more outrage than the Chris Brown situation.
    There might be an argument that the court of public opinion has been so contrived against Brown, his career never has hopes of recovering. I find that unlikely (after all, being accused of sexual violence didn’t stop Roman Polanski from enjoying a vibrant career, nor Mike Tyson) but what I find more hilarious is that it is somehow on we, the public, to give Brown a pass.
    In my opinion, Chris Brown (and other abusers) may be “forgiven” when they take real accountability for their crimes (and no, using synthetic eye drops during a critical moment at a concert to inspire the idea you’re, like, truly super-sorry doesn’t count), and when domestic violence (and other forms of violence) victims aren’t continually blamed for being victimized. I’m tired of people pleading for offenders to be given a second chance when victims aren’t, and never really have a decent chance of hoping for that. Rihanna’s career may not have suffered because of what she went through, but just like Tina Turner before her, she will be forever associated with surviving domestic violence, and that may not be an identity that she wants.

  • GREGORYABUTLER10031

    “What price do you want him to pay?”
    Well, he should have gotten at least a year and a day in jail and a felony record – which is what he would have gotten if he’d beaten a male stranger, instead of a woman who was in a relationship with him.
    Chris Brown hasn’t suffered at all, and he deserves no sympathy from anybody, no matter how many fake stage tears he cries on TV!

  • GREGORYABUTLER10031

    If Chris Brown wasn’t a wealthy and famous man with $ 1,000 an hour attorneys and a legion of media apologists, he’d be “finding redemption” on the main line at the California Institution for Men in Chino, so please, spare me the sympathy for this rich overentitled misogynist bully.

  • GREGORYABUTLER10031

    Honeybee,
    Stealing because you’re broke is a bad thing, but it’s understandable and forgivable.
    Working in illegal businesses – like, for example, drug dealing (or for that matter prostitution or illegal gambling) are basically victimless “crimes” that are only illegal because of American puritan moralism – and those folks have nothing to apologize for whatsoever (in fact America owes them an apology for persecuting them).
    But beating up a woman because she started an argument with you?
    No, that’s really not forgivable – it’s cowardly and pathetic and even though we live in a misogynist society, that’s not an excuse for the woman beaters because most men don’t beat their partners.
    As far as I’m concerned, to quote a lyric from the great Lauren Hill, Chris Brown is a “Punk Domestic Violence Man” and I for the life of me don’t get why any feminist would feel an ounce of sympathy for him.
    Plus he really has not suffered!
    He’s still a multimillionaire, people are still downloading his songs, he’s starring in major motion pictures, he lives in a mansion, he drives (or is chauffeured in) luxury cars, he eats in the finest restaurants, he vacations at the best resorts, parties in the VIP sections of the hottest nightclubs – in short, he lives like a king!
    And he never did a day in jail for his brutal crimes.
    Chris Brown does not deserve your forgiveness

  • GREGORYABUTLER10031

    1). Not everybody is Christian (personally, I’m an atheist) so not all of us are bound by that religion’s moral codes.
    2). Not everybody deserves forgiveness.
    3). There is a huge difference between a fistfight between two males of roughly equal size and strength and a man beating up a woman who is much smaller and less strong than he is.
    So no, Chris Brown does not get my forgiveness.

  • Cassius

    I think bottom line is, you can handle the incident whatever way you want. But I do not see why some people get angry if others do not share their opinion. You think a hockey player beating another hockey player is horrible and stop being a fan. Others are not bothered and keep being a fan. Some people seem to be more bothered by the reaction of other people than with the story at hand.

  • Chris

    “But I do not see why some people get angry if others do not share their opinion.”
    Because it encourages a culture of abuse.
    “You think a hockey player beating another hockey player is horrible and stop being a fan. Others are not bothered and keep being a fan.”
    Do you seriously think a sports brawl is the same thing as domestic abuse? Do you think athletes are beaten to death by those they love and trust on a daily basis?
    You should probably do more research on the subject if you’re only jumping onto this site because Chris Brown is mentioned.

  • TabloidScully

    Well-said. Some of the outrage aimed at Chris Brown is likely due to his racial heritage. But the fact that Mel Gibson and Charlie Sheen are assholes getting away with it because they’re white doesn’t mean that Chris Brown automatically deserves a pass because he’s black and naturally facing more racism in the scrutiny of his conduct. Racism is not a reasonable or viable excuse to avoid responsibility for committing assault.