What We Missed

A blogger is YouTubing and live-tweeting her abortion, saying, “I’m doing this to de-mystify abortion.”
Dana Goldstein talks to disability rights leaders about their skepticism towards Sarah Palin’s disability advocacy (or lack thereof).
While the existing state health plan in South Carolina only covers abortion in cases of rape, incest or to save the life of the woman, apparently that wasn’t enough for State Rep. Rex Rice, who introduced legislation that would ban abortion under any circumstance. Nice guy, he is.
Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has let Congress know of the Navy’s plans to finally allow women aboard submarines.

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6 Comments

  1. Ravencomeslaughing
    Posted February 24, 2010 at 7:43 pm | Permalink

    The comments on the first item are quite interesting to look at with the various opinions. I have to take issue with a couple of them, though. The ones that make me angry are the ones that say it’s always horrible and you’ll feel horrible and you’ll regret it, blah blah blah. I had an abortion at 18. I’m now nearly 40, still don’t have kids, and thanks to getting my tubes tied, never will. I do not for one second regret the choice I made, I don’t feel bad in any way. And yes, I was quite aware the entire time that it was a human zygote (not old enough to be a fetus, use the rights words.) and nothing else. I do not sit around and wonder what the kid would have looked like or anything.
    I refuse to let anyone else tell me how I SHOULD feel.

  2. IAmGopherrr
    Posted February 24, 2010 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

    All the power to the blogger woman!!However I hope no one gives her shit for this. I wish pro-choice people had an army to protect brave women like this. Someone to protect her.

  3. KatieCat
    Posted February 24, 2010 at 11:35 pm | Permalink

    Way to go blogger! I had a surgical abortion this past summer and I wish I could have had the process filmed or something. Just to PROVE that it isn’t a terrifying or violent procedure. It was quick (less than 6 minutes) and not uncomfortable. I was so happy after! I was so relieved (and a little drugged). My boyfriend still laughs about how I came back out into the waiting room with a HUGE smile on my face and started rambling to the other women how free I felt.
    I should also mention that I went home to my little sister and her 2 week old son, whom I adore! This needs to be de-stigmatized. It’s not always a difficult decision, it’s not scary and we’re regular women!
    KUDOS!

  4. uberhausfrau
    Posted February 25, 2010 at 10:10 am | Permalink

    i had to click the article because my first thought was a surgical abortion and i was wondering just how she was going to liveblog that!
    my first abortion was before i had kids and there were times afterwards i wondered what things would be like if i hadnt because there was a lot of emotional crap surrounding that time. but ultimately, i dont regret it – i wouldnt have my two boys and my partner and i wouldnt be able to be where we are today.
    now my second abortion was in january of last year and it seems like not a day goes by when i dont say “thank-farking-maude” i dont have another baby at my hip.
    and on a more general point the livejournal community “abortioninfo” is a great resource for women who are facing an unplanned/unwanted pregnancy. lots of gals and SOs post nuts and bolts questions as well as their stories and after-care issues.

  5. Toongrrl
    Posted February 25, 2010 at 11:43 am | Permalink

    Sarah Palin is so reality tv show material

  6. makomk
    Posted February 26, 2010 at 10:27 am | Permalink

    Adam Pockriss, a spokesperson for Autism Speaks, wrote in an email to The Daily Beast that since the 2009 Westchester fundraising walk, “Sarah Palin hasn’t had any further involvement with Autism Speaks; nor has she taken a position on any autism-related policy items, to our knowledge.”
    And this is supposed to be a bad thing? As I recall, Autism Speaks seems to be less about helping people with autism and more about helping other people not have to deal with them…

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