What We Missed.

Portfolio.com looks at the ongoing question of whether we need women’s media.
The White House doesn’t like gay people.
In Russia the “Miss Positive” pageant queen is being discriminated against in trying to adopt back her own son.
The 12 most powerful women in digital media.

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8 Comments

  1. fairbanksgrrrl
    Posted December 1, 2009 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

    FYI, on the “Miss Positive” story, it’s her brother she’s trying to adopt, not her son. It’s still completely ridiculous, of course.

  2. Brittany
    Posted December 1, 2009 at 6:18 pm | Permalink

    “Russian authorities won’t let HIV-positive beauty queen Svetlana Izambayeva adopt her 10-year-old brother from an orphanage”
    So it’s her brother, not her son. :)
    It’s still just as heartbreaking, though, but thank goodness Agora is helping her fight the illegal and misinformed orphanage’s decision.
    Too many people think it’s unsafe to be around someone HIV positive, as if you can somehow get it by breathing their air.

  3. aleks
    Posted December 1, 2009 at 6:44 pm | Permalink

    You mean The Clinton White House proudly pandered to gay haters, and the Obama White House is awkwardly fumbling with Clinton’s anti-gay laws.

  4. Gopher
    Posted December 1, 2009 at 7:01 pm | Permalink

    ” the DoubleX found some early critics, like the American Prospect’s Ann Friedman, who worried about the “niche-ification of the Internet,” writing, “the problem with branding certain types of articles ‘for women’ is that it still advances a false gender divide.”
    Seven months later, that criticism was echoed by Jezebel’s Anna North, in a post headlined Do We Need Websites For Women? As if to answer that very point, over 200 commenters weighed in on the topic, confirming the loyal and intensely engaged audiences that flock to sites like Jezebel (part of Nick Denton’s Gawker Media) and DoubleX, as well as Salon’s Broadsheet blog, Yahoo’s Shine, AOL’s Lemondrop, Turner’s the Frisky, and independent sites like Feministing.”
    I know its corny. But does anyone else get happy when feminist groups are mentioned? Especially this one? Its a good way of getting a feminist presence back out into the mainstream media.

  5. Comrade Kevin
    Posted December 1, 2009 at 7:16 pm | Permalink

    The death of Double X mirrors that of Womens’ Studies programs, which are usually the first to be cut during times of budget crunch and are seen as a second to third rate disciplines in the opinion of many academicians.
    I am conflicted about the idea of whether women’s media is necessary. Over the weekend I visited the Arch Street Friends Meeting House in Philadelphia whose worship service was once divided along gender lines. A faith that long preached equality established a separate meeting for women who might have been otherwise afraid of speaking publicly and with candor around their husbands or other men. I notice even today in my own meeting that many women appear uncomfortable or reluctant to speak first, though some, it should be noted, are not. With time, these stigmas have subsided though I am presented with conflicting anecdotal evidence as to whether separate spaces are needed between the sexes.
    I am tempted to say that until courageous women demand the right to speak first and speak even in spaces long officially and unofficially deemed the domain of men only, that isolating our voices may not be the best strategy. I’ll be blunt. I began visiting this site to find a feminine perspective rarely granted me by women I was dating, even though I encouraged and asked for complete honesty. That it takes the relative anonymity of the internet for me to have access to information that both enlightens me and makes me a better ally in the process is certainly food for thought.

  6. aletheia_shortwave
    Posted December 1, 2009 at 8:56 pm | Permalink

    Re: The 12 Most Powerful Women in Digital Media
    This is a good thing to take note of. But it’s absolutely astonishing to me that the Huffington Post was started by a woman, Arianna Huffington. There is a lot of good stuff on there, but it is alongside such sexist trash that I’ve stopped reading the site. Anytime they mention a woman, invariably, 9/10 times, it’s a Hollywood celebrity or in the context of a sex scandal. Whenever a man is mentioned he is just as likely to be talking about important world-affairs or business stuff.
    Two sample headlines pulled off the front page just now:
    –Teen ‘Skank Agent’ Charged In Craigslist Prostitution Scheme
    –Rachel Uchitel SPEAKS: Calls Source Of Tiger Woods Affair Rumors A ‘F**king Hooker’

    It just goes to show that women are capable of perpetuating and enabling sexism nearly as much as men are.

  7. lucierohan
    Posted December 2, 2009 at 8:31 am | Permalink

    Re: The 12 Most Powerful Women in Digital Media
    Wow…not one woman of color, huh?

  8. sage
    Posted December 2, 2009 at 11:01 am | Permalink

    They did slip Oprah in there as number 12, but I was about to comment about the same thing. The low representation women of color in the top 12 disturbed me as well.

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