Keeping schools safe through period-monitoring

As a security measure, a school in upstate New York, has banned students from carrying bags (backpacks, purses anything). Unless you’re a menstruating girl, that is. Need some clarification? So did I.

A student at Tri-Valley High School was called out of class by a security guard during a school sweep last week to make sure no kids had backpacks or other banned bags.
Samantha Martin, 14, had a small purse with her that day.
That’s why the security guard, ex-Monticello cop Mike Bunce, asked her The Question.
She says he told her she couldn’t have a purse unless she had her period. Then he asked, “Do you have your period?”
Samantha was mortified.

Apparently, there was a school rumor (not an actual rule) that girls could only carry small bags or purses if they had their periods. So security guards starting pulling girls out of classes, or questioning them in the hallways, about whether they were menstruating or not. Real appropriate.
What’s heartening, though, is that the students aren’t taking this crap without a fight.

Girls have worn tampons on their clothes in protest, and purses made out of tampon boxes. Some boys wore maxi-pads stuck to their shirts in support.
After hearing that someone might have been suspended for the protest, freshman Hannah Lindquist, 14, went to talk to {Principal Robert] Worden. She wore her protest necklace, an OB tampon box on a piece of yarn. She said Worden confiscated it, talked to her about the code of conduct and the backpack rule — and told her she was now “part of the problem.”

Yeah, girls who don’t want creepy security guards knowing about their cycles are huge problems. Soon, they’ll expect things like basic respect and privacy rights!
h/t to Shannon.

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58 Comments

  1. Daniel Burk
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

    That is fucking infuriating. And that dipshit principal should lose his job.

  2. Shinobi
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

    ARe they allowed to have pockets? Because things can be hidden in pockets. They should also ban Pockets.
    And while we’re at it, what about clothes. I mean you can hide all kinds of things in the waistbands of your clothing, in your shoes, in your underwear.
    Why don’t we just require that students attend class naked so that we can make sure that they have absolutely no privacy whatsoever.
    Ridiculous.

  3. Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:09 pm | Permalink

    That is insane. But it’s demonstrating the effect of paranoia and militarism in schools more than sexism, I think. Yes, it’s absurd and infuriating that they would imagine it’s ok to ask girls if they’re menstruating. But this isn’t about discriminating against girls; it’s about being idiotic and having to suffer the practical consequences of your bullshit policies.

  4. Kimmy
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:10 pm | Permalink

    First of all, without bags of any sort, how are the students supposed to function? Pens, pencils, erasers, sharpeners, markers, highlighters, books, notebooks, paper…I could go on and on. The amount of stuff I kept in my backpack (and actually used on a regular basis) was astounding. Not to even mention personal items like hair bands, wallet, pleasure reading, prescription medications, etc.
    So I don’t understand how this rule can work in the first place. Which makes this whole “Little girl, is it your time?” thing even stupider.
    Secondly, how can they not get how creepy and inappropriate this is? I mean, dear lord! They’re grilling young girls about personal body processes. These girls are young enough that many of them are probably barely comfortable with what’s happening to them as it is. And even if they were older, it’s still creepy as hell. Good for them for fighting back. I hope some of their parents start raising holy hell in a more legal sense, because this is just wrong.

  5. moriath
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:16 pm | Permalink

    The school = skeevy and creepy. Of course, if it were true that girls were allowed to carry their purses on their periods either a) everyone would be bleeding all the time b) girls would be singled out when they were on their period because EVERYONE would know when they were having it by virtue of the purse.
    The students = awesome for protesting it. It’s amazing that even the boys were willing to jump in by wearing pads!

  6. Kimmy
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:16 pm | Permalink

    Oh, and a “thank you” should also go out to the boys who are showing their support by wearing pads on their shirts. Not only is it cool when guys actually care enough to say something about what’s happening to girls, but at that age it’s almost a damned miracle. I don’t think a single fourteen-year-old boy I’ve ever known would have been brave enough to risk ridicule from his peers in that way, so I’m very impressed.

  7. Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:18 pm | Permalink

    Yeah, as someone who graduated high school last year, I can say that this doesn’t surprise me at all. Students in high school have barely any rights. During my junior year, someone lit a fire in one of the girls’ bathrooms. In response, the principal had all of the girls’ bathrooms locked except one, and a security guard sat outside of it to inspect the bathroom before and after you used it. So basically about 1,000 girls had to use just one bathroom, and plus be treated like criminals if they did use it. So yeah. I’m not surprised.

  8. amazonratz
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    This is wrong on so many levels, and I applaud the students for resisting. Perhaps if the school had to provide a ready supply of *every* type of tampon and pad for each student, all the time, FREE, since they can’t carry their own, they would demur–the bottom line seems to be the only thing these fascist systems care about. Certainly not the privacy or civil rights of their students…

  9. DDay
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:35 pm | Permalink

    Reminds me a lot of middle school. We weren’t allowed to have backpacks during the day and could only go to our lockers at certain times of the day. Pads and tampons would be kept in either your pocket or pencil cases (which isn’t exactly sanitary).
    But what used to annoy me the most was that someone would clog sinks using paper towels and soap. So what did they do? They removed soap from the bathrooms!

  10. Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:45 pm | Permalink

    Okay, what about the obvious? Teenagers frequently have quite irregular periods and therefore may need to carry supplies with them everywhere they go or risk humiliating surprises.
    “Detain her, boys! This uterus could go off at any minute!”

  11. Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

    Wow, as fucked up as this is, the students’ response is AWESOME. I really can’t imagine most teenage girls being willing to walk around with tampons on their clothing, so the fact that they are is beyond cool. And though I can see boys wearing a pad on their shirt as a joke, I think that it being part of a protest opens them up to taunting from their peers. So kudos to them, too.
    While we’re on the subject of menstrual product jewelery, the necklace sounds great and all, but you know what would be about a million times better? Tampon earrings. Seriously. Think about it, pass it on, and I want to see some pictures.

  12. Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    Cara, somebody beat you to that one.
    http://www.tamponcrafts.com/

  13. Blitzgal
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    Gross. This story has shades of the “thong inspection” that one administrator (female) conducted at the door of a high school dance. The girls weren’t allowed to wear thongs, so she forced the students to show her their underwear before they could go into the dance. Where was that? I think I read about it on this blog. And of course you had the Texas guy who wanted to ban sexy cheerleading. People are a leeeetle too obsessed with the sexuality of young folks.

  14. DrkEyedCajn
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    Haha! I seriuosly think that is one of the best protests ever.
    Can you imagine being one of those poor teachers though, trying to teach an already insanely boring subject to a classroom full of giggling, tampon- and pad-adorned teenagers?

  15. Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

    prescription medications, etc.

    Hooboy, no. Those’ll get you expelled now. You have to register them with the school nurse, leave them there, and request them when you need them.
    Some schools have even confiscated inhalers, although I don’t think that’s as common anymore.

  16. Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:06 pm | Permalink

    Akeeyu: YES!
    Personally, I wasn’t going to get nearly that arts and crafty about it, and was working off an idea of just tying a tampon to a small hoop earring. But hey, this works too!

  17. Shira
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    The part about the boys joining into the protest just gives me so much hope for the next generation. First it was all the boys wearing and distributing pink shirts to combat homophobia, and now this? Things have changed so much since I was in ninth grade, and that was only 6 years ago!

  18. SDstuck
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

    Kudos to the students who did this. It is a non-violent, non-destructive way to point out the utter stupidity of the school policy.
    Some parents really ought to be jumping in on this preferably with lawyers in tow.

  19. LindsayPW
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:30 pm | Permalink

    Ew that’s really creepy. Does this not go against some law against privacy or something?
    I’m glad that they are at least retaliating in a peaceful yet snarky manner. Kudos to those kids.

  20. AmyGoose
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    I spoke at a middle school last year on first amendment rights for schoolkids, and the girls in the class stopped me afterwards to see if I had any ideas they could use to persuade their school to get rid of the rule forbidding the use of purses or backpacks at any time, even at “that time of the month.” The girls were forced to keep their tampons and pads in their lockers and carry them out in the open because their school uniforms didn’t have pockets. When I suggested their parents talk to adminstrators and explain the concerns, they told me the adminstrators blew them off even when told boys were harassing them on the way to the bathroom. Totally unbelieveable, but apparently the usual course of business given this post.

  21. Mehitabel
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

    I agree that the school’s actions were inappropriate and intrusive, but couldn’t the students have found a better way to protest? Feminine products attached to clothing–that’s pretty tacky.
    I remember walk-outs and sit-ins being effective when I was in high school. I’d rather have died than parade around with tampons dangling from my person.

  22. Kimmy
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 4:07 pm | Permalink

    Yes, heaven forfend you do anything tacky when your rights are being trampled on and people are questioning you about personal bodily functions.
    Maybe kids today are more comfortable with the facts of their lives. Maybe they have a better grip on irony. Or maybe they just know that the only way to get anyone to notice you is to put the message in their faces as much as you can. Besides, at least this way no one can tell them they aren’t still attending class and doing the appropriate work.

  23. ShifterCat
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 4:28 pm | Permalink

    I’m in agreement with Kimmy here, Mehitabel. In my experience, walk-outs and sit-ins tend to be “some people do it once, get apprehended, and everyone drops it” activities. This method, of wearing outrageous protest clothing, is more difficult for school administrators to stop, can be done repeatedly, and is likely to have a snowball effect in regards to the number of participants.

  24. UltraMagnus
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 4:47 pm | Permalink

    Like someone above said, all the girls would have been on their periods at different times and even some might have just lied and said they were just to carry the purse. Me being the smartass I am, if I had been pulled out into the hall and questioned about my period I would have asked if/how they were going to prove I was or wasn’t. :)
    Or it would be a great, Spartacus type moment where all the girls (and those lovely brave boys) all bring purses and when asked everyone admits that yes, they are all on their periods.

  25. prairielily
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

    I remember someone trying to organize a walk-out when I was in high school. My friends and I thought it was silly because we weren’t willing to miss class to participate. Most of us were politically active, but we just weren’t willing to miss chemistry or physics to make a point.
    I imagine that these students feel the same way. If you want to go to get good grades, you need to be in class, learning. You can do that with a tampon taped to your shirt, but not if you’re sitting outside, protesting.

  26. oenophile
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 6:42 pm | Permalink

    I cannot believe the insanity of people who would ask that question. Why not just let the girl go on her way? So what if every girl, every day, carries a tiny purse so to be sure that they aren’t announcing menstrual cycles to anyone?
    Incredibly cool of the men to help out with the protest.
    IMHO, the tampon/pad thing is tacky, but that’s the point. The fact is, the girls were trying to be discreet. Most teenage girls WANT to be discreet. They are forced to be completely open about it (i.e. carrying purses for four days a month) and forced to discuss their cycles with security guards. Um, I think the POINT of the tacky jewelry is to say, “You won’t let us be discreet and classy? TAKE THIS, B-TCH!”

  27. tostartarevolution
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 6:48 pm | Permalink

    This is ridiculous but completely not unheard of. In my elementary school (and i can think of 5 out of 20ish girls who had their period in 5th grade) the washroom doors were kept open! I also remember a girl who in 7th grade went to the nurse and asked for a pad and the nurse asked why she didn’t come to school prepared. For pity’s sake she was 12. It could have been her FIRST period.
    When I was a sophomore, I remember a girl that had the NERVE to leave a class we had together two days in a row to use the washroom when she was on her period. The male teacher gave her a hard time about it and she finally had to say “I’m having a woman problem and don’t have any supples” before he would allow her to go to the nurse.
    Furthermore, my high school had a swimming pool and one month of swimming a year was mandatory. CO ed gym no less and a girl had the right to opt out of swimming four consecutive days out of the month when she had her period. However, she had to walk around the pool wearing her gym uniform which didn’t exactly grant her any privacy. How many people get exactly 4 day periods either? And if yours lasted longer than 4 days, your parents had to write a note for the male swimming coach. Furthermore, the coach did not allow girls who were on the swim team to take their four days out of the pool during gym class.
    So basically, in my district, a girl’s menstrual cycle was on display for all who cared to know.
    However, any time a teacher told me to hurry up when i asked to use the washroom, I would say “you can only change a tampon so fast” so I never really had a problem.

  28. tostartarevolution
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 6:49 pm | Permalink

    This is ridiculous but completely not unheard of. In my elementary school (and i can think of 5 out of 20ish girls who had their period in 5th grade) the washroom doors were kept open! I also remember a girl who in 7th grade went to the nurse and asked for a pad and the nurse asked why she didn’t come to school prepared. For pity’s sake she was 12. It could have been her FIRST period.
    When I was a sophomore, I remember a girl that had the NERVE to leave a class we had together two days in a row to use the washroom when she was on her period. The male teacher gave her a hard time about it and she finally had to say “I’m having a woman problem and don’t have any supples” before he would allow her to go to the nurse.
    Furthermore, my high school had a swimming pool and one month of swimming a year was mandatory. CO ed gym no less and a girl had the right to opt out of swimming four consecutive days out of the month when she had her period. However, she had to walk around the pool wearing her gym uniform which didn’t exactly grant her any privacy. How many people get exactly 4 day periods either? And if yours lasted longer than 4 days, your parents had to write a note for the male swimming coach. Furthermore, the coach did not allow girls who were on the swim team to take their four days out of the pool during gym class.
    So basically, in my district, a girl’s menstrual cycle was on display for all who cared to know.
    However, any time a teacher told me to hurry up when i asked to use the washroom, I would say “you can only change a tampon so fast” so I never really had a problem.

  29. Cola
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 7:16 pm | Permalink

    For all their talk about teaching kids to become active members of society, they really hate it when kids find creative and positive ways to organise and speak their minds.
    I mean, how smart and meaningful was their choice? They have a right to dignity and privacy which was violated, and so they took it upon themselves to force that feeling of objectification and discomfort on their authority figures in return without resorting to vandalism or disrupting their schedules.
    What they did is a perfect example of organisation for a clear and meaningful purpose, and what happens? “You disgusting little brats!”
    Way to send the right message.

  30. femmeecrite
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 7:33 pm | Permalink

    i had a similar experience as several of the women on this thread. In middle school we couldn’t carry backpacks or purses (i remember slipping pads into my pockets, hoping no one would notice the crinkling sound of the wrapper), and in high school, they locked the bathrooms during class, and we only had five minutes between classes to go. I remember all teachers raising a stink, not allowing you to go unless you “had a doctor’s note.”

    So, what did I do? I got a doctor’s note. I still remember the pride I felt, shoving the note at my male teacher when he refused my bathroom use, and the look on his face as he grudgingly allowed me to go.
    I’m alarmed to hear that young girls are having similar experiences. Administrators need to find new rules that don’t take away students’ rights.

  31. SpaceCakeFeminist
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 7:46 pm | Permalink

    I’m a substitute teacher in the third largest school district in the country, so I’m in all kinds of schools all day long and many schools don’t allow backpacks or purses. I’m not surprised at all. It’s very common and it’s only becoming more common.
    Typically students put their backpacks in their lockers at the beginning of the school day and get the supplies for the first half of their classes. Then they get a locker break to put away that stuff and get things for the second half of their classes. At the end of the day they can go to their lockers to retrieve their belongings to take home.

  32. Roxie
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 8:59 pm | Permalink

    What happened to mesh or clear backpacks? that’s what we had in middle school

  33. Mina
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 9:43 pm | Permalink

    “During my junior year, someone lit a fire in one of the girls’ bathrooms. In response, the principal had all of the girls’ bathrooms locked except one, and a security guard sat outside of it to inspect the bathroom before and after you used it.”
    Something like that happened in my high school. Some kids smoked in the bathrooms, so during the 5 minutes between classes only 2 pairs of bathrooms for 700 students were open…and during classes those 2 were locked and another 1 pair of bathrooms were open. Once the teacher about to go on bathroom monitor duty was given the wrong keys and there were 0 bathrooms available for students for a while. the school admins backed off once the Parent-Teacher Association threatened a student protest.
    Meanwhile, the girls’ bathrooms had pad vending machines (no tampon vending – I guess someone complained in the name of hymens) but by the time I was in 12th grade the machines were never stocked.
    “The part about the boys joining into the protest just gives me so much hope for the next generation. First it was all the boys wearing and distributing pink shirts to combat homophobia, and now this?”
    Yeah, I’m hopeful too. :)
    “I cannot believe the insanity of people who would ask that question. Why not just let the girl go on her way? So what if every girl, every day, carries a tiny purse so to be sure that they aren’t announcing menstrual cycles to anyone?”
    Maybe someone in charge really wants to know when a girl goes without a period for 4 months, instead of 1 month or 9 months, then had a period again…?
    Meanwhile, does this remind anyone else of those school districts in which girls are expected to drop out of school at menarche because the schools don’t have bathrooms at all?
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/23/international/africa/23ethiopia.html?_r=1&n=Top%2fNews%2fHealth%2fDiseases%2c%20Conditions%2c%20and%20Health%20Topics%2fMenstruation&oref=slogin

  34. hellotampon
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 10:33 pm | Permalink

    Why didn’t the school just stock the bathrooms with a ton of pads and tampons when they came up with the no-bags rule? Duh.

  35. Posted September 28, 2007 at 10:50 pm | Permalink

    Oh man, I’m back at Boston Latin School when I read about this stuff. It’s the oldest public school in the country (seriously, Ben Franklin went there), and it’s supposedly very prestigious, but god help you if you’re not a total drone. The school had grades 7-12, so we’re talking kids between the ages of 12-18. We would have about 6 classes a day, each with its own text book and notebook. That makes for one heavy-ass backpack, especially on the back of a 12 year old kid. But ya know, the BACKPACK wasn’t the problem, it was the sadistic-as-hell teachers making us carry them home every night, and the ridiculously short time between classes that forced us to carry them throughout the school day as well. And as for the concern about concealed weapons, you can get yourself a metal detector if you’re that freaked out.
    Also at good old BLS was a nurse who was infamous for asking the same question whenever a girl came in with a problem:
    DO YA THINK IT’S YA PERIOD, HONEY?
    And MAN was she loud. My friend went in one day from gym class because she’d twisted her ankle or something and asked for some tylenol for it.
    DO YA THINK IT’S YA PERIOD, HONEY?
    Didn’t matter who else was in the room. It was AWFUL. And since I have ADHD and take medication for it, I had to stop by the nurse’s office every day after lunch to get it because carrying it myself was illegal or some shit. So one day I walked into the office and Nurse Loudmouth sees me and says “OH, IT’S THE RITALIN GIRL.”
    Yeah, that’s a big help to an awkward, self conscious 13 year old. Confidentiality, anyone?
    These kids give me hope for the future.

  36. JenLovesPonies
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 11:12 pm | Permalink

    I remember being in a “bad” neighborhood in Chicago once, waiting for the El, and I saw a bunch of high school age kids with clear backpacks. I couldn’t figure out why this was suddenly popular, and then I realized, it was so that they couldn’t carry weapons. I went to school in the suburbs, which weren’t necessarily better, but at least we could carry bags.
    Although, a year after I graduated, they forced all the kids out of lunch one period sans their bags and purses, and proceeded to dump out the contents of each in search of drugs and stuff, while the kids all sat in the theatre. It was the strangest thing I have ever heard of, and I don’t think it was legal. There was tlak of a walk-out in protest, but the college-bound seniors didn’t want to screw up their college chances. So they didn’t do a damn thing.

  37. Mina
    Posted September 28, 2007 at 11:36 pm | Permalink

    “Although, a year after I graduated, they forced all the kids out of lunch one period sans their bags and purses, and proceeded to dump out the contents of each in search of drugs and stuff, while the kids all sat in the theatre. It was the strangest thing I have ever heard of, and I don’t think it was legal.”
    I heard of one school in which some cop came in to give some presentation in class, and in the middle of it asked a girl to come up to the front of the class and empty her purse.
    Halfway through (and not after she took out any pads or tampons), he told her to stop and then explained to the class how searches like that could actually be illegal. Apparently the presentation was some “know your rights!” thing.

  38. Jess
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 12:12 am | Permalink

    Um, couldn’t a security guard or teacher asking a girl if she’s on her period be considered sexual harassment? I would be super creeped out and offended, considering I was uncomfortable telling my female teachers I needed to go to the nurse’s office for cramps.

  39. The Crab
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 2:04 am | Permalink

    I claim authorship of the phrase: “The Million Pad March.”

  40. lamplight
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 4:19 am | Permalink

    I am delighted to hear about the way that these students protested the school’s ridiculous practice – and heartened by the response of the boys. So many women, particularly young women, are taught to feel ashamed of menstruating. It is all hidden, and we are told by the sanitary companies that it is dirty through the common scenting of products to hide the smell of our blood. Women shouldnt feel ashamed of this integral aspect of themselves and it is great to see young women out there telling the school to shove its attitude by their protest. Years ago, in Australia, the government brought in a goods and services tax and decreed in their wisdom that pads and tampons were luxury items. There was much talk of women protesting by ceasing to wear them when bleeding. I love this site but there are some really scary things going on out there – it boggles to mind.

  41. Posted September 29, 2007 at 9:09 am | Permalink

    http://www.tamponcrafts.com
    in case they need ideas :)

  42. Mina
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 10:40 am | Permalink

    “And MAN was she loud. My friend went in one day from gym class because she’d twisted her ankle or something and asked for some tylenol for it.
    DO YA THINK IT’S YA PERIOD, HONEY?”
    Did any boy ever walk in with some problem and tell the nurse “I THINK IT’S MY PERIOD, HONEY”?

  43. ambidextrous amazon
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

    I thought it was on the verge of sexual harassment when a substitute teacher for study hall (which you could only take if you had a high-level math course in the same semester) in high school asked me why I had to visit the bathroom after I asked for the hall pass. I kept saying “because I have to go to the bathroom” and when he kept inquiring, I finally responded “I HAVE TO CHANGE MY TAMPON.” At least he had the sense to shut the hell up and look embarrassed as he handed me the pass.
    I mean, wtf. It’s hard enough for high school kids without having to deal with necessary biological functions being hindered or outright banned, and now they also have to deal with adults asking them creepy-ass, way-inappropriate questions. Good for the protesters.

  44. alecksander
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

    I remember talking in school about how there’s some court case that established that constitutional rights do not exist for students inside school, that once you’re in a school the faculty takes the place of your parents and can therefore do whatever they want. We had this terrible “soft lockdown” in my high school last year because someone had written a bomb threat on the wall in a bathroom. So for about 5 months we had to have escorts take us everywhere if we needed to leave during class, and during class changes only one bathroom in the commons was open. Thankfully, the teachers were all pretty pissed about it too, so they were really leanient if you showed up a little late. I remember having to cal my dad to pick me up once, and after i was done using the phone i had to wait for about 20 minutes for an escort to walk me about 12 feet down the hall back to class. Then once my dad got there i had to wait another 20. It was so fucked up.

  45. ambidextrous amazon
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

    Sorry, I just re-read my comment and it sounds kinda snotty that I added info about the math requirement. I did it not to “show off” (I’m an average-intelligent slacker nowadays) but to illustrate that the class wasn’t exactly full of the type of kids who would set off cherry bombs in the toilets or skip school and stuff. At least, not as a general rule.
    Not that *any* kid should be made to feel like a criminal just because an unknown party messed up a bathroom.

  46. ProfLindquist
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

    I have followed this discussion with great interest, as Hannah is my tampon-box-wearing daughter. It’s really heartening to find so many of you so supportive of these kids, who are bravely standing up to this demeaning treatment. I really do want to say thank you to the original poster and those who have said kind words–I’ll share them with the girls. They feel quite besieged now, as I’m sure you can imagine.
    Our little town, and the kids’ protest, made the national news even! There’s video to be seen on some of the NYC-area tv station websites.

  47. annejumps
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 3:31 pm | Permalink

    Why didn’t the school just stock the bathrooms with a ton of pads and tampons when they came up with the no-bags rule? Duh.
    That would be socialism, silly!

  48. Mina
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 4:59 pm | Permalink

    “Why didn’t the school just stock the bathrooms with a ton of pads and tampons when they came up with the no-bags rule? Duh.
    “That would be socialism, silly!”
    The capitalist version would be installing the bathrooms with pad and tampon vending machines (or at least pad vending machines if not both), and at least allowing the students to wear clothes with pockets (in which to keep coins). I get the impression that this school doesn’t do that either.

  49. Lorelei
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 8:30 pm | Permalink

    When I was in 8th grade, I went to a Catholc school. Those of us in advanced math (I don’t know why I was in this class, mind you) had to take the class in the morning at the Catholic high school. Our teacher, no matter which way you cut it, was a total dipshit in every respect.
    He had some wicked nazi bathroom pass policy (in a class of a whopping eight people). A girl in my class went to the bathroom, and shortly after she returned, asked if she could go back. He told her no over and over and she kept arguing with him that she REALLY had to, and he kept telling her he couldn’t, and she said, ‘Okay, I didn’t want to have to tell you, but I have my period and I have to go take care of this.’ He still told her no and added, ‘Why didn’t you work it out the first time you were in there?’
    Finally, she says: ‘I went to the bathroom the first time to check if I needed to change my tampon. Right now, I had a stream of blood DRIPPING DOWN MY LEG as we speak. So I’m going.’ And she left the class.
    Of course, we all applauded her, and our teacher said he would ~*DEFINITELY BE REPORTING HER TO OUR PRINCIPAL FOR INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR ZOMG*~. So she and a couple of other girls in our class went to our principal before he did to explain the situation, and she said that this was one of the most ridiculous and highly inappropriate things she’s ever heard of a male teacher doing, and she effectively told us that if and when he calls to complain to her, she would first laugh in his face, and then give him the biggest talking to he’ll probably ever have.
    Which was totally awesome :D

  50. Mina
    Posted September 29, 2007 at 9:47 pm | Permalink

    “Finally, she says: ‘I went to the bathroom the first time to check if I needed to change my tampon. Right now, I had a stream of blood DRIPPING DOWN MY LEG as we speak. So I’m going.’ And she left the class.”
    Wow, that takes guts for a kid. Also, I’m almost surprised that when she said the word “tampon” that jerk of a teacher didn’t yell at her about keeping one’s hymen.
    “So she and a couple of other girls in our class went to our principal before he did to explain the situation, and she said that this was one of the most ridiculous and highly inappropriate things she’s ever heard of a male teacher doing, and she effectively told us that if and when he calls to complain to her, she would first laugh in his face, and then give him the biggest talking to he’ll probably ever have.
    “Which was totally awesome
    “:D”
    I totally agree.

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