Periods are hysterical.


Can I just say that this e-card is just insanely un-funny? You want (accidental) PMS humor? See if you can find those old commercials for Sarafem–you know, Prozac for ladies on the rag.
I remember one TV ad where a woman with PMDD was brushing her hair in front of her vanity. Friendly hubby comes in the room, saying “Honey…?” She throws the brush on the vanity and snarls, “What do YOU want?!” Of course post-Prozac, she’s a doting wife. Just saying.

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45 Comments

  1. Posted March 15, 2007 at 1:06 pm | Permalink

    … or a ROBOT. When the metal ones come for you, and they will.
    I suggest this one instead.

  2. Kimmy
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

    Yeah, I’m laughing my pad off over here. The only people who are surprised that a period might make someone grumpy are those who’ve never had one. And even I will be a bundle of sunshine again once the cramps stop. *owie*

  3. Posted March 15, 2007 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

    I’m so tired of that kind of humor.
    I do realize that for some women, PMS is a really big deal, but I think that society has a horrible tendency to explain away women’s anger by assigning it to her reproductive organs.
    I read somewhere that something like 80% of women who sought treatment for PMS did so at the insistence of their male partners.

  4. mt
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 1:47 pm | Permalink

    i just heard somewhere recently that it’s been proven that the hormone levels that women have when they’re pms’ing is comparable to men’s hormone leves all the time. i like that argument a lot, but i think i got it from a comment section of another site. has anyone else heard this? or at least where i can find reliable information regarding this?

  5. Genny
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    I don’t get PMS but thanks to Primary Dysmenorrhea I do get kinda bitchy during my period. It’s less hormonal and more “I’m in a lot of pain, so I have no patience”.
    I’ve always been confused as to how guys take any bitchy woman as “must be on the rag” when every man I’ve ever known cannot get a stuffy nose without informing the world at large of his suffering and demand kid-glove treatment. Because, really, I’m not allowed to be a little unhappy while my uterus is contracting into a tiny ball and I’m tired all the time and nauseous but your sinuses hurt so I have to pet your head and speak softly to you? Please. It’s called sudafed. Call me when your raging case of asshole clears up.

  6. Posted March 15, 2007 at 2:04 pm | Permalink

    I totally agree with you, Jenny Dreadful.
    I’ve never understood people’s opinions of PMS. In my 4 years of college, I lived with a total of 23 women. I never experienced any of them getting into overt hissy fits over their periods.

  7. LindsayPW
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

    I know I usually get a little more irritable and don’t like to be touched when I’m pmsing but I guess compared to what other women experience I’ve got a pretty silent period. But this could be just because I’m on the pill.

  8. Anonymous
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

    ugh. so sick of period jokes.

  9. Posted March 15, 2007 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    This is almost as bad as that joke about why we don’t have a female president — because every 28 days there’d be a war. Assertiveness in a woman is either chalked up to “bitchiness” or “PMSing” (don’t you love how the latter is now a verb?) yet assertive, aggressive males get a pass. Well, I say f*ck that.
    I struggled with assertiveness for a really long time. I used to feel like “Oh, I shouldn’t make a fuss, I should just go with the flow,” etc. But over the past few years I have been trying to break myself of that habit and give myself permission to raise hell when the situation calls for it. And if I get called a bitch (or worse), I take it as a compliment.

  10. ElleMariachi
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

    “I’ve always been confused as to how guys take any bitchy woman as “must be on the rag” when every man I’ve ever known cannot get a stuffy nose without informing the world at large of his suffering and demand kid-glove treatment. Because, really, I’m not allowed to be a little unhappy while my uterus is contracting into a tiny ball and I’m tired all the time and nauseous but your sinuses hurt so I have to pet your head and speak softly to you? Please. It’s called sudafed. Call me when your raging case of asshole clears up.”
    Oh my God, Genny. Effing hilarious.
    I like the little silhouette at the beginning of the ecard with the apron on. How cute–PMS mommy threw a tantrum while she was baking a pie and washing dishes.

  11. Charity
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    mt – i heard that too recently; it was referred to (somewhat tongue-in-cheek) as “testosterone poisoning” (as an alternative to “PMS” or “PMDD”.) I will try to find a source.

  12. Charity
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 4:06 pm | Permalink

    And I definitely agree that women’s anger is undermined / explained away(and thus its expression discouraged / shamed / controlled) in this way along with a myriad of others, so it’s no wonder that so many women are conflicted about anger and assertiveness.

  13. Posted March 15, 2007 at 7:36 pm | Permalink

    What’s fascinating to me is how often the “Oh, she’s just PMSing” argument says that all women everywhere have the same reaction to PMS – and it’s all hormonal. Obviously if a woman is upset about something it’s because of her hormones, and not because there’s actually something wrong.

  14. cupcakesofdeath
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 7:44 pm | Permalink

    PMS jokes have become so socially acceptable that I find it hard to defend myself when one gets me angry.
    Case in point, today our coffee guy came in to bring us a new espresso grinder. Our old one was named “Rocky” (for some reason…I really don’t know.) So this new one was donned “Rockette,” because, as my co-worker assured, “It’s a female, so it won’t give us trouble all the time anymore.”
    To which, our snarky coffee rep said, “Yeah, only once a month.”
    And they both started laughing hysterically…all I could do was shoot them both a withering look and say, “Listen, men have hormonal fluxes too you know…” (assholes)
    Oh if only I had dropped “testosterone poisoning” instead…fiddlesticks.

  15. JustAnotherJane
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 10:43 pm | Permalink

    Jeanne when you said “I should just go with the flow” it kind of took on a dual meaning for me in regards to this post :P
    I hate PMS myths too. I would LOVE to see a man deal with copious amounts of blood pouring out of his genitals. I can’t wait until I can convince a doctor to rip my 25 year old uterus out. My constant fantasy.

  16. Pickleberry
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 11:01 pm | Permalink

    Jenny Dreadful – I agree.
    It still seems that all of womens’ “mood problems” can be attributable in some way to her reproductive status – “she’s depressed because she never had kids…she’d be happy if only she had a man…. she’s just angry because she has her period” etc.
    Another favorite *not* of mine is, of course “never trust anything that bleeds for a week and doesn’t die.”

  17. prairielily
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 11:13 pm | Permalink

    It’s not blood, it’s lining.
    As a teenager, I never had PMS, but then I became clinically depressed. I find that since then, my self-esteem crashes right before my period. So yes, my boyfriend has asked me if I’m about to get my period, but only because I only tend to cry about how I’m completely worthless and deserve to die around that time. (And it doesn’t even happen EVERY month.)
    So yeah, I get it, but I still don’t appreciate it being applied as a blanket generalization on all women because men can’t deal with them stepping out their meek gender role.

  18. JustAnotherJane
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 11:24 pm | Permalink

    “it’s not blood, it’s lining.”
    Thanks, prairielily, I’m sure it was obvious I had no idea what the menstrual cycle was. Blood is released during menses and blood is how I generalize it, rather than saying lining, blood, and mucus. Because it looks like blood.
    It’s much better than women calling their vulvas vaginas when those two things look nothing like each other.

  19. prairielily
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 11:30 pm | Permalink

    Please don’t get upset… it was just a joke. It’s what I respond with when I hear that awful “bleeds for a week and doesn’t die” joke.
    I wasn’t trying to be snotty.

  20. JustAnotherJane
    Posted March 15, 2007 at 11:39 pm | Permalink

    ::flushes with embarrassment::
    I’m sorry –
    I MUST BE PMSing since I overreacted so much!
    forgive me? (sincerely).

  21. Nula
    Posted March 16, 2007 at 6:03 am | Permalink

    I just sent American Greetings a letter informing them that it was time to get out of the 1950s and that the card was unconscionable. I guess that’s my new thing, writing letters to everyone that pisses me off, because yesterday I wrote a letter to Glamour (UK) magazine about the over-the-top-and-extremely-overt sexism that was in the most recent issue. I suggest you try it, it’s very cathartic. (and by the way, the e-mail you can send letters to regarding this particular piece of crap is consumer.relations@amgreetings.com )

  22. Mina
    Posted March 16, 2007 at 7:00 am | Permalink

    BTW, did that remind anyone else of this?
    http://www.somethingpositive.net/sp02072005.shtml

  23. redwards
    Posted March 16, 2007 at 12:15 pm | Permalink

    http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/40/3/492
    “A cycle of plasma testosterone in the human male”
    i think this might have been what ya’ll were talking about in reference testosterone fluxes…

  24. Posted March 16, 2007 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

    mt: if I recall correctly from my grade 12 biology class, women’s levels of estrogen and progesterone are at their lowest right before the start of menstruation. And, since men don’t exactly have high levels of either hormone to begin with … tada! Instant manliness. Or “bitchyness,” as the menfolk like to call it when confronted by anything that doesn’t smile while carrying in a beer and a sandwich. ;)

  25. prairielily
    Posted March 16, 2007 at 5:36 pm | Permalink

    Thanks, brainiac. I was trying to figure out how it worked in my head, but I was thinking of it in terms of a surge in testosterone.
    JustAnotherJane, it’s fine. I was just a little surprised that you took it that way, because don’t think I generally act like other posters are stupid or don’t know their Biology. Because really, put together, the posters on this blog know EVERYTHING. There’s always someone with some expertise to share.

  26. ambidextrous amazon
    Posted March 17, 2007 at 1:16 pm | Permalink

    I got sick of PMS jokes around the time I heard my first one, from my similar-aged cousin around pubescence (mine came a bit earlier than his). It was in response to something I said that was only mildly complaining and totally throw-away. I could only give him a withering stare and walk away. I think that could have been what set me on a trajectory towards feminism and such.
    I got him back a short time later, when he noticed two or three pubes sticking out of my bathing suit bottom (at around age 12) and started making fun of them. I said “yeah, I guess I got mine already, you got yours yet?” He went red in the face and hasn’t said anything offensive to me since. Stupid maybe, but not offensive. :)

  27. Ivy
    Posted March 17, 2007 at 6:45 pm | Permalink

    LOLOLOLOL!!! That was hilarious!! Gotta love terrorist humor!
    The best thing about the whole PMS thing is that it’s an illusion. There’s no scientific evidence which shows that hormone levels cause these drastic changes in behavior. Women are just conditioned to behave this way during their periods.

  28. Anonymous
    Posted March 17, 2007 at 6:59 pm | Permalink

    oh yeah, PMS is an illusion, alright. just like fibromyalgia. women, hysterical creatures that they are will make up ANYTHING for attention. *rolls eyes*

  29. stellaelizabeth
    Posted March 17, 2007 at 7:00 pm | Permalink

    what’s SUPER funny about that is that my symptoms of PREmenstrual syndrome are that i get a big old zit on my face and a funny feeling in my uterine area alongside some feelings of self-doubt and nausea. before my period even starts! so i can definitely see what you mean about how i was conditioned to behave that way, behaving crampy and whatnot.
    i recognize i am being snarky herein, and it is because i resent the implications and assumptions above (“Women are just conditioned to behave this way during their periods.”) and take the generalization personally.

  30. Ivy
    Posted March 17, 2007 at 9:54 pm | Permalink

    Doublefantasy, Stellaelizabeth, you both obviously have no idea what I’m talking about. Did you honestly believe I was insinuating that the cramps and bloating were a fabrication? HA!
    First of all, those aren’t behaviors. They are symptoms. Second, it is true that women are programmed to believe that they HAVE to behave in hysterical and unreasonably emotional ways during their periods. There are many cultures the world over where women do not exhibit the radical behaviors seen in, at least, American culture.

  31. Posted March 17, 2007 at 10:27 pm | Permalink

    Seriously, Ivy? You seriously, truly believe all women (or all women of American extraction/women who live in the U.S.) believe that they must act in an “unreasonably emotional way”, pre-period? I’m genuinely curious, because that sounds like a hell of an inflammatory thing to throw out there. Obviously I can only speak for myself, but I have never felt compelled to exaggerate the way I feel before I have my period. I usually keep to myself and take some painkillers, and I can get pretty quiet and introverted, but I’m not running around wailing and being “hysterical” and throwing tantrums. To assume that we all do this is insulting, quite frankly. Those who menstruate are women… not five-year-olds.
    Having said that, I’d also like to address your use of the word “hysterical”, since it’s one that has been used for quite some time to describe women with medical conditions – as though women cannot be trusted to describe what is making them feel ill. It has also been used to dismiss women’s medical problems as mere figments of the imagination.
    I gather from other posts you have made that you are a man (with which I have no inherent issue, just to be clear). I would assume, then, that any medical issues you have addressed with your doctor/s have all been taken seriously, and you have never been made to feel like you are just complaining for the hell of it. I have experienced this kind of quiet hostility from medical professionals and for this reason I am reluctant to go to the doctor unless I can barely get out of bed, even though I know that the best cure for anything is preventative medicine. (Now that I live in the U.S., I won’t get into how insurance issues affect my ability to see a doctor on a regular basis… but it is a factor.)
    I say all of this not to be all, “Nyah nyah nyah, you’re wrong”… but to hope that maybe you might consider the weight of the words you are throwing out there. Thanks.

  32. Ivy
    Posted March 17, 2007 at 11:17 pm | Permalink

    Here, Sammy. This is a pretty interesting article and it really helps to shed some light on the subject.
    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A07E7DB153BF934A35750C0A964948260&sec=health&spon=&pagewanted=1
    The big issue is not the illness, it’s the person’s RESPONSE to that illness. Like you said, you don’t behave hysterically or overly emotionally. You take a couple of pain killers and that’s that. Many women, not all women, are conditioned to believe that they’re supposed to be emotionally hysterical during their pre-menstruation phase. My professor’s wife used to have horrible mood swings during her menstrual cycle. When she learned it’s probably just learned behavior, those mood swings ceased. While dysmenorrhea affects 50% of women, the cramps and pain are not debilitating. Such severe pains occur in only 10% of women. When it comes to emotional fluctuations, there is little compelling evidence which supports drastic changes in behavior being caused by the menstrual cycle. Even if it were, such women should be locked up in mental institutions (i.e., they are incapable of controlling their behavior).
    I’d say the vast majority of women use their menstrual cycles as an excuse to release pent up aggressions and fears. They see it as a valid excuse. If you’re suffering from severe menstrual pains, Sammy, then try taking progesterone. The article above recommends using natural progesterone. Not that artificial crap. As for your doctor, perhaps the reason he’s not taking you “seriously” is because you’re not suffering from a clinically treatable condition. You might just need to adjust your diet, like the article recommends.

  33. donna darko
    Posted March 18, 2007 at 12:12 am | Permalink

    Men have periods. They’re called wars. –Chuck D. in Bust Magazine Aug/Sept 2005

  34. donna darko
    Posted March 18, 2007 at 12:20 am | Permalink

    Now that’s hysterical.

  35. Posted March 18, 2007 at 12:49 am | Permalink

    Let me see if I can try to sort through some of this mess.
    There may be some value to what Ivy is saying. I don’t think we can really say, on the one hand, that society wrongly assumes ALL women suffer from PMS, and that PMS is the source of all womanly woes, and on the other say that there’s no social expectation that women have PMS. I know that I have certainly gotten that sense… I’ve never had horrendous PMS — nasty cramps sometimes, and attendant irritability because I’m in physical pain, but none of the bloating or weird cravings other women report. And when I was younger a small part of me always felt like I “should” feel those things, because that’s what “all” women feel. I think it’s valid to worry that society tries to tell us how we “ought” to feel on our periods, or how a period “ought” to be. It is how it is, and to the extent society treats PMS like some monolithic hormonal cocktail it does a disservice to women’s unique and individual bodies. Similarly, this sort of attitude does us all a disservice by suggesting that EVERY time a woman is upset, it is due to a hormonal imbalance (rather than, say, frustration at the rampant social inequalities that confront us around every corner).
    That said, Ivy, I think you are coming dangerously close to suggesting that women “blame” PMS/hormones where they shouldn’t. Unless you’re a doctor treating a specific patient you really have no grounds to say anything about any particular woman’s health. PMS is VERY real, and it affects some women VERY profoundly, and these effects should not and cannot be dismissed as socio-psychological phantom symptoms. The bottom line is that the only person who knows what’s going on with a woman’s body is the woman, and SOMETIMES her doctor (if she has a decent doctor — but as comments here have shown, there are far too few of these).
    I think the problem is that it’s hard for us to tell, Ivy, if you’re simply dismissing PMS, or if you’re questioning the social mythology surrounding it. Obviously questioning the mythology is absolutely appropriate, and is a highly feminist exercise. Dismissing a proven medical condition, however, is counterproductive and inflammatory.

  36. Ivy
    Posted March 18, 2007 at 9:49 am | Permalink

    The first half of your post captures what I’m saying, Law Fairy.
    As for “blaming”, I never said that. They more likely use it as an excuse, though I use that word loosely here. Let me explain.
    Everyone here knows that virtually ALL human behavior is learned. We have very few reflexes (i.e., reflex arches). The few we are born with quickly fade in the first months of life (the babinski reflex, the Darwinian reflex, etc.). That said, we do possess predisposing factors for certain types of behaviors from our genes. These genes ultimately control the production of peptides and hormones. However, hormones do not control behavior. They contribute to particular behavioral outcomes, but they are insufficient to explain particular behaviors. For example, for many years testosterone has been used to partially explain the tendency for men to be more violent. However, (let me get my textbook) this is insufficient as an explanation, especially when we look at the disparities between the sexes. By the end of puberty, females are producing and average of 25 ng of testosterone. Males, on average, are producing 460 ng. Even the most docile and friendly men are producing significantly more androgens than women. Does testosterone predispose men towards aggressive behavior? Quite possibly, but how it manifests is learned.
    The same principle applies to PMS. Hormonal activity predisposes women to behave a certain way. However, this is not set in stone by their hormones. How women react to their pre-menstrual cycles, except for those extremes cases such as endometriosis, is by and large a learned behavior. One of the possible psychological explanations, mentioned in the article from my last post, is that women repress their angers and fears caused by the female gender role throughout the month. They are supposed to be loving, selflessly nurturing, etc.. Being aggressive is not allowed. However, their pre-menstrual cycles give them an excuse to behave in ways they otherwise would not.
    As for PMS not being real, I never said this. This e-card does not address the physical symptoms of PMS. It talks about the stereotypical behaviors of PMSing women.
    As for dismissing the mythology surrounding PMS being “a highly feminist exercise”, I disagree. It has nothing to do with feminism. All that is needed is reason, logic, and a healthy respect for the truth. If you are trying to say that feminists exhibit these traits on this issue, then I understand what you are saying. I might be mistaken in thinking your implied message is only feminists would use these traits on this issue.

  37. Posted March 18, 2007 at 12:42 pm | Permalink

    Ivy, I’m compelled to agree with you. I think we do attribute too much of our learned behaviors to biology, when it’s truly only responsible for a minuscule subset of behaviors.
    I say that it’s a feminist exercise because I do think that feminism entails, inherently, skepticism of the status quo, particularly where women’s bodies are concerned, and here it’s an extension of that. I don’t think “only” feminists would approach this problem this way — surely not all biological researchers are feminists — but I do think that on this particular issue, there are necessarily feminist implications, even if the project is not undertaken with feminist intent.
    But, Ivy, note that I never, ever mean “feminist” as anything but a compliment ;)

  38. agtdonut
    Posted March 18, 2007 at 1:06 pm | Permalink

    oh yeah, PMS is an illusion, alright. just like fibromyalgia. women, hysterical creatures that they are will make up ANYTHING for attention. *rolls eyes*
    Thanks Double Fantasy, I have fibromyalgia and PMS pretty bad. Trying to get treated for fibromyalgia at Kaiser is damn near impossible. If I don’t have symptoms (tender spots) the day I go in, I’m making the whole thing up. Probably just to get valium or vicodin or whatever they think I’m up to.
    Also I used to think PMS was bullcrap as a dumb teen and younger woman obviously because I didn’t suffer from it. (I’m not egocentric anymore I promise!) I don’t know what happened but at 25 my body CHANGED big time. Now I have severe PMS and it is a huge problem for me and my DH. I have no patience for anyone or anything, I have severe abdominal pain, my weight can fluctuate more than 5 pounds, my bra size goes up over a full cup size. The worst is that I feel like I am the woman being sawed in half at a magic show. That brand Thermacare that makes those heat wraps should put me on their xmas card list I buy so many – in bulk at costco.
    So if you don’t have it, please don’t think it’s a farce. You may just not have it YET like in my case.
    Does anyone here know any good treatments or alternatives to midol, pamprin, etc.? Those pills are a joke but I’m worried to go messing with prescription stuff to alleviate this.

  39. Ivy
    Posted March 18, 2007 at 1:20 pm | Permalink

    “But, Ivy, note that I never, ever mean “feminist” as anything but a compliment ;) ”-Law Fairy
    LOLOLOL!! Point taken, Law Fairy. ;)

  40. ambidextrous amazon
    Posted March 18, 2007 at 1:36 pm | Permalink

    agtdonut, try naproxen (brand name is Aleve but it comes in generic form). It is a NSAID, the class of painkillers which also relieve swelling and inflammation to some extent.
    Motrin contains ibuprofen which is also an NSAID, but in my experience and from what I have been told by a doctor or two, naproxen seems to work better for many women when it comes to cycle-related pains and symptoms. Nobody knows why, apparently. It also has a longer half-life so you don’t have to take it as often as other painkillers.
    Pamprin is a TOTAL joke because it contains acetaminophen which isn’t an NSAID (only helps with pain, and kind of poorly at that). It is also way more risky for your liver than other painkillers. Plus it has a diuretic (which may be useful for bloating but not much else) and an antihistamine (no idea what that is supposed to relieve).
    According to the official website, the “all-day” formulation of Pamprin contains naproxen in the same amount as Aleve, but I just go with Aleve to avoid confusion. It isn’t the perfect drug, but for me it is far more effective than anything else I’ve tried.
    Hope that helps!

  41. EG
    Posted March 19, 2007 at 10:22 am | Permalink

    I find it hard to believe that I’ve just been socially conditioned into having PMS, given the fact that I don’t have it that often, and that when I do, it follows this usual course of events:
    I feel like crap for a couple of days. My body feels uncomfortable, I feel easily irritated, and I’m grumpy for no reason whatsoever. This goes on for a few days with me not having any idea why I feel so lousy, and then I get my period, at which point I think “Oh, that explains it! OK.”
    Add to that the fact that it mostly happens when my period is a few days early or a few days late, and I fail to see how it could be all in my head.

  42. tofutti
    Posted March 21, 2007 at 9:59 pm | Permalink

    I think the #1 reason why this isn’t funny (besides that it’s just stupid) is that there is nothing original about it. I mean, seriously… there’s really no need for another period joke. They’re so repetitive. It’s always the same punchline. How many times can somebody laugh at the same joke?
    The only people who make these jokes, and laugh at them, are people don’t get periods.

  43. mama_miah
    Posted April 14, 2007 at 1:27 am | Permalink

    Wow, so if PMS is really a learned condition, can I be unconditioned to have it? Please!!! Seriously, I am ready! I would have to say the people that take the point of view of pms being a learned behavior have obviously never experienced it. Let’s see… Two weeks before my period starts, sometimes three because, yes, my pms can actually make me so stressed out and upset that I end up starting five days late and not being able to get out of bed and end up popping advil every hour due to the excruciating pain, and let’s not even get started on the mood swings, water retention and food cravings/weight gain. Oh there is also depression, exhaustion, nausea and severe migraines. So, did you say this was all a learned behavior? Because seriously I am ready to become uneducated.
    I had a child seven years ago and I have to say this pms progressively got worse after I had him and really hit the ground running when I turned twenty four (I am now twenty six). The doc says I may have pmdd and wrote me two scripts for it today, and I am not happy that I need to take it but I am going to try because I am that desparate!!

  44. mama_miah
    Posted April 14, 2007 at 1:28 am | Permalink

    Wow, so if PMS is really a learned condition, can I be unconditioned to have it? Please!!! Seriously, I am ready! I would have to say the people that take the point of view of pms being a learned behavior have obviously never experienced it. Let’s see… Two weeks before my period starts, sometimes three because, yes, my pms can actually make me so stressed out and upset that I end up starting five days late and not being able to get out of bed and end up popping advil every hour due to the excruciating pain, and let’s not even get started on the mood swings, water retention and food cravings/weight gain. Oh there is also depression, exhaustion, nausea and severe migraines. So, did you say this was all a learned behavior? Because seriously I am ready to become uneducated.
    I had a child seven years ago and I have to say this pms progressively got worse after I had him and really hit the ground running when I turned twenty four (I am now twenty six). The doc says I may have pmdd and wrote me two scripts for it today, and I am not happy that I need to take it but I am going to try because I am that desparate!!

  45. caiis
    Posted April 14, 2007 at 2:29 am | Permalink

    Ivy said:

    The best thing about the whole PMS thing is that it’s an illusion. There’s no scientific evidence which shows that hormone levels cause these drastic changes in behavior.

    and then referred people to an article published in 1982 to ‘shed light’on things, which says (my emphasis):

    Women with severe symptoms, according to this theory, may secrete insufficient amounts of important brain chemicals, such as endorphins, the brain’s own opiate. This may lead to a reduction in the hormones secreted by the pituitary gland, which in turn can interfere with a woman’s mood, behavior, appetite, thirst, digestion and fluid retention – salient symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.
    The emerging scientific consensus concerning the physiological causes of premenstrual syndrome, however, has yet to impress itself upon the public at large. Many physicians still consider the syndrome to be a nondisease, or an imaginary one, and they still tend to treat it either symptomatically – with diuretics and antidepressants – or not at all.

    The article DOES NOT say that PMS is an illusion and DOES say that it is physiological. Way to back up your argument, Ivy.
    And by the way, telling someone to change their diet or take hormones is obviously showing that there is something to treat, which also shows that an PMS is not illusionary as you called it.

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