Preggies do it on their own.

While we’ve raised the issue of midwifery before and questioned how necessary hospitals really are when it comes to natural childbirth, a recent study has found that coaching during labor may be unnecessary, even possibly harmful.
The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology published the study in their January issue, which was conducted in at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. It was there that they split 320 pregnant women into “coached” and “uncoached” groups. In the end, the only variation between the two groups was that the coached women endured thirteen minutes less of labor time than the uncoached.
So where does coaching become potentially harmful? Some months later, the women who were coached during childbirth had less bladder capacity and more overactive bladder muscles than the others. These symptoms may potentially contribute to incontinence.
While the researchers didn’t conclude that coaching is truly dangerous for women, they have said that letting them “labor down” — otherwise giving them more control over the pace of the delivery — may be used as a potential alternative.

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  • http://lamom.blogs.com LAmom

    A little added info: The type of coaching they are discussing is coaching during the second stage of labor, the pushing stage. During that stage, a lot of people have the idea that they have to urge the woman to push and strain with all her might, which can cause the type of problems described in the study.
    During the first stage of labor (the dilating stage) coaching usually consists of helping the woman relax and maybe trying to get her to do those cute patterned-breathing techniques. Nothing that would cause any bladder troubles.
    Back in 1984, Sheila Kitzinger published a book called Episiotomy and the Second Stage of Labor that said the same things about coached pushing being unnecessary. She however, was female and not a doctor, which may be a part of the reason that it’s taken a while for information like this to reach the mainstream.

  • chuym

    Wow… it sounds like what women do all over the world…. how fucking novel. I wish OBs would get their heads out of their … asses and start understanding that the way that some king wanted things to go, and ignoring one’s body, does not constitute a good idea.
    At least we are further away from episiotomies and completely departed from forceps. Although, we have entered the realm of the scheduled birth via c-section for the rich white woman.

  • http://aldahlia.net aldahlia

    “Although, we have entered the realm of the scheduled birth via c-section for the rich white woman.”
    How very selective of you. Brazil has the highest rates of scheduled elective ceasarians in the world.

  • http://www.bloodlesscoup.com/blog Binky Rasmussen

    “How very selective of you. Brazil has the highest rates of scheduled elective ceasarians in the world.”
    And of you. If you look at the rates they will generaly reveal that the women are of the affluent class, and would self-identify as white.

  • Random

    “At least we are further away from episiotomies and completely departed from forceps.”
    This is an uninformed statement. Forceps are a very useful tool that could help some women avoid a c-section. The reason why “we’re moving away” from them is because they look scary, and women don’t want them used. Many doctors now don’t know how to use them because their patients would rather have them section them. Which is too bad – might save somebody an unwanted/unneeded surgery.
    The results of this study have limited application though since majority of women get some sort of pain relief during labor, and this study applies only to those who didn’t.

  • GamesOnline

    it sounds like what women do all over the world…. how fucking novel. I wish OBs would get their heads out of their … asses and start understanding that the way that some king wanted things to go, and ignoring one’s body, does not constitute a good idea.free online games