Posts Tagged women in the workforce

Fast food workers across the nation strike for better wages

This week, fast food workers around the country have been holding strikes and demanding a living wage:

What began in Manhattan eight months ago first spread to Chicago and Washington and this week has hit St. Louis, Kansas City, Detroit and Flint, Mich. On Wednesday alone, workers picketed McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Popeye’s and Long John Silver’s restaurants in those cities with an ambitious agenda: pay of $15 an hour, twice what many now earn.

And while the stereotype of a fast food worker tends to be a teenager, two thirds of these workers are in fact adult women, and they’re disproportionately women of color – many of whom have children and other family to support:

One Taco Bell worker, ...

This week, fast food workers around the country have been holding strikes and demanding a living wage:

What began in Manhattan eight months ago first spread to Chicago and Washington and this week has hit St. Louis, ...

In defense of crying at work

Sheryl Sandberg says in Lean In that it’s cool to cry at work. Anne Kreamer reports in her book It’s Always Personal: Emotion in the New Workplace (2011) that 41 percent of women and 9 percent of men had cried in front of others at work and it had not impacted them negatively. Dr. Peggy Drexler, in a recent article for The Daily Beast, argues that crying at work, particularly in response to institutional frustration or stress (not because of perceived personal criticism), can actually be productive by creating bonds, clearing tension, and fostering empathy among co-workers.

And yet — and yet.

And yet there’s still a debate over whether crying is something to embrace, or avoid at all costs. That’s because when ...

Sheryl Sandberg says in Lean In that it’s cool to cry at work. Anne Kreamer reports in her book It’s Always Personal: Emotion in the New Workplace (2011) that 41 percent of women and 9 percent of men had cried ...

Chart of the Day: Only 30 percent of new jobs have gone to women

According to these NYT charts, of the 5.3 million jobs added during the economic recovery over the last few years, only 30 percent of them went to women. In part, that’s because more jobs held by men were lost in the recession (remember the endless talk about the “hecession“?) But, Pat Garfola notes at ThinkProgress, “austerity is also contributing to this problem, as government job losses disproportionately hurt women.”

And the gender skew to the recovery has meant that the decades-long trend of women making up an ever-increasing portion of the workforce has stalled for the first time since the ’50s. In fact, a smaller percentage of women over 20 are working today than at the bottom of the ...

According to these NYT charts, of the 5.3 million jobs added during the economic recovery over the last few years, only 30 percent of them went to women. In part, that’s because more jobs held by men ...