Posts Tagged women in science

73 of the sexiest Black female scientists

In response to a Business Insider article published last year, entitled Sexiest Scientists Alive!, that failed to include any Black women, Dr. Kyla McMullen created a list of her own. Her list of Sexy Black Female Scientists combats both the invisibility of Black women in STEM, and the idea that those Black women aren’t sexy. According to her:

“Despite the magazine’s intentional or unintentional exclusion, the purpose of this article is to increase the visibility of Black female scientists and show the world that we do exist.

Being omitted in the Business Insider adds to the constant feelings of invisibility and isolation that are felt by many women of color in STEM fields.

In response to a Business Insider article published last year, entitled Sexiest Scientists Alive!, that failed to include any Black women, Dr. Kyla McMullen created a list of her own. Her list of

Five times Cosmos’ Neil deGrasse Tyson stole my feminist heart

At first glance, it might seem safe to assume that a documentary series about the science of the universe — from the tiniest atoms to the most distant galaxies — wouldn’t intersect much with feminism or social justice. But that assumption would be wrong if you’re talking about Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey and its spectacular host, Neil deGrasse Tyson.

At first glance, it might seem safe to assume that a documentary series about the science of the universe — from the tiniest atoms to the most distant galaxies — wouldn’t intersect much with feminism or social ...

Quick Hit: “Am I actually any good at writing, or was he just supporting me because he was sexually interested in me?”

Science writer Hannah Waters, who is a friend of mine, has a brave and important piece up at LadyBits about her experience being sexually harassed by an editor.

Hannah is speaking out now because earlier this week another writer, Monica Byrne, accused the same person, Bora Zivkovic, editor of Scientific American’s blog network, of harassment. As friends and colleagues rally to defend the accused and ridicule the accuser (boy, these stories play out so predictably, don’t they?) Hannah wrote her piece to “let Monica know that she is not crazy, as people on Twitter are saying, and that she is not alone.”

It’s a great piece. Hannah skillfully conveys why harassment that’s subtle enough that you can second-guess your own experience of it can be so ...

Science writer Hannah Waters, who is a friend of mine, has a brave and important piece up at LadyBits about her experience being sexually harassed by an editor.

Hannah is speaking out now because earlier this ...

Add women to Wikipedia for Ada Lovelace Day


October 15 is Ada Lovelace Day, founded in 2009 to celebrate the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Ada Lovelace, born in 1815, wrote several programs for Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, a design that was never built but that foreshadowed today’s computers.


October 15 is Ada Lovelace Day, founded in 2009 to celebrate the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Ada Lovelace, born in 1815, wrote several programs for Charles Babbage’s Analytical ...

Friday Feminist Fuck Yeah: LEGO unveils its first female scientist

Meet Professor C. Bodin!

Photo credit: Maia Weinstock

I mean, it’s only taken a few decades since LEGO first launched minifigures in 1978 to get a female scientist on the roster. And sure, the total gender ratio of minifigure models is roughly 4:1 in favor of men–and the female ones that do exists seem excessively pink. (Last year, our friends over at SPARK protested the way the LEGO Friends line reinforced gender stereotypes.)

But hopefully this is one small step toward a future in which The New York Times isn’t still writing perplexed articles about the missing women in math and science.

Meet Professor C. Bodin!

Photo credit: Maia Weinstock

I mean, it’s only taken a few decades since LEGO first launched minifigures in 1978 to get a female scientist on the roster. And sure, the total gender ...

Brilliant teen creates device that charges cell in 30 seconds!

Eesha Khare is an 18-year-old high school senior. She’s going to Harvard in the fall and uses her cellphone. Typical 18-year-old girl stuff. Oh, she also invented a supercapacitor that charges cell phones in 30 seconds! According to Clutch:

“Eesha Khare, 18, invented a fast-charging device called the supercapacitor. It is miniature energy-storing device that can juice a phone to full charge within 20-to-30 seconds.”

Apparently she developed the device because she got tired of her phone not being charged. When my phone is dying, the best I can think to do is log off of Twitter for a while. This young woman is sharp!

Not only that, she’s doing it with great intentions and ambitious ...

Eesha Khare is an 18-year-old high school senior. She’s going to Harvard in the fall and uses her cellphone. Typical 18-year-old girl stuff. Oh, she also invented a supercapacitor that charges cell ...

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