Posts Tagged War

New report: sexual assault victims failed, even at VA hospitals

As the Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN) reported last week on its new blog, a scathing new report was just published by the Government Accountability Office detailing how the Department of Veterans Affairs is failing at both preventing and tracking sexual assaults at VA facilities across the country. For example, they report that “nearly two-thirds of sexual assault incidents” of which there were nearly 300, “involving rape allegations originating in VA facilities were not reported to the VA Office of the Inspector General, as required by VA regulation.”

As has been discussed widely here at Feministing, and elsewhere, military sexual assault is rampant. The Department of Defense estimates that over 19,000 sexual assaults occurred in the military ...

As the Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN) reported last week on its new blog, a scathing new report was just published by the Government Accountability Office detailing how the Department of Veterans Affairs is failing ...

Reactions to Bin Laden’s death by gender

“Throughout human history, war has been seen as a gendered activity, one that separates men and women into more sharply defined roles than almost any other undertaking.”

— quoted from materials for “In the War Zone: How Does Gender Matter?”, a 2005 conference at Harvard University

Where were you when you found out about the death of Osama Bin Laden?

I was at a neighborhood bar in Crown Heights, where a friend of mine was celebrating her birthday. The DJ had been on a roll, playing Jill Scott, D’angelo, and Janet Jackson as the birthday girl swayed and laughed. When the music cut off suddenly, everyone began to loudly voice their disapproval- until they realized that history was unfolding on the large projector ...

“Throughout human history, war has been seen as a gendered activity, one that separates men and women into more sharply defined roles than almost any other undertaking.”

— quoted from materials for “In the War Zone: How Does ...

What do you mean when you say justice?

I do not know how bad a life has to break in order to kill.

I’ve never been so hungry that i willed hunger,

Never so angry as to want a gun over a pen.

-Suheir Hammad, First Writing Since

I realized something Sunday night when the news of Osama bin Laden’s assassination broke and as I watched the reaction unfold: when I say “justice” I mean something very different than when many other people say the word. I heard about “justice” in President Obama’s speech, on Facebook and Twitter, in the news, in the partying crowd outside the White House.

That’s not what I call justice. I don’t see justice in violence responding to violence. I see vengeance. I don’t see justice in ...

I do not know how bad a life has to break in order to kill.

I’ve never been so hungry that i willed hunger,

Never so angry as to want a gun over a pen.

-Suheir Hammad, First Writing ...

What I Will by Suheir Hammad

This poem spread among my friends on Facebook yesterday. These are the words I needed following the celebration of Osama bin Laden’s assassination in the midst of endless war. Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet and acivist. She was born to refugees in Jordan and immigrated to Brooklyn. “What I Will” was written in response to the conflict between Israel and Palestine. It feels incredibly apt right now.
Transcript from TED Blog after the jump.

Also check Hammad’s words on 9/11, “First Writing Since.”

h/t Yasmine, Bilen and many others.

This poem spread among my friends on Facebook yesterday. These are the words I needed following the celebration of Osama bin Laden’s assassination in the midst of endless war. Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet and acivist. ...

Women: anti-war softies or pro-war nags?

Robert Dreyfuss has an ill-advised piece at The Nation in which he tries to pin US intervention in Libya on the gender of Obama’s advisors – namely that three women pushed for military action:

We’d like to think that women in power would somehow be less pro-war, but in the Obama administration at least it appears that the bellicosity is worst among Hillary Clinton, Susan Rice and Samantha Power. All three are liberal interventionists, and all three seem to believe that when the United States exercises military force it has some profound, moral, life-saving character to it. Far from it. Unless President Obama’s better instincts manage to reign in his warrior women—and happily, there’s a chance of that—the United ...

Robert Dreyfuss has an ill-advised piece at The Nation in which he tries to pin US intervention in Libya on the gender of Obama’s advisors – namely that three women pushed for military action:

We’d like ...

Iraqi women get increasingly less power

Remember how the Bush’s administration used women’s rights as an emotional appeal when selling the Iraq War to us back in the day? During the 2004 Republican National Convention, Bush claimed that with the “use of American power” in Afghanistan and Iraq, “young women across the Middle East will hear the message that their day of equality and justice is coming.”

Iraqi and Afghani women are still waiting. It turns out that the status of women has actually gotten worse since 2003 when America declared itself oppressed women’s knights-in-shining-armor. On everything from maternity leave to workforce representation, women have suffered, and now political leadership is waning. According to the New York Times:

Iraqi ...

Remember how the Bush’s administration used women’s rights as an emotional appeal when selling the Iraq War to us back in the day? During the 2004 Republican National Convention, Bush claimed that with the “use of ...

What makes a “good” man?

Amy Ernst is a young American woman who is working in Congo, with an organization that supports survivors of rape. Rape is commonplace in Congo, and in addition to its emotional and physical impacts on survivors, it creates a ripple effect of stigmatization, isolation and poverty. This is what makes it such an effective weapon of war. Ernst, guest blogging at Nicholas Kristof’s blog “On the Ground,” writes about husbands whose choose not to abandon their wives when their wives are raped:

Due to social stigma and, in many cases, pregnancy, it’s common for men in North Kivu to leave their families if their wives are raped. But there are also men like Paluku. Paluku encouraged Hangie to go to ...

Amy Ernst is a young American woman who is working in Congo, with an organization that supports survivors of rape. Rape is commonplace in Congo, and in addition to its emotional and physical impacts on survivors, it ...

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