Posts Tagged victim-blaming

How “You get what you put out” encourages victim blaming

There are two things about me that continue to have a significant impact on my life: (1) I spend a LOT of time on the internet; and (2) I have spent a LOT of that time feeling down and out in the aftermath of traumatic episodes. As a result, I am confident that I have been on the receiving end of every shallow (yet probably well-intentioned), mostly-useless platitude that is supposed to provide some sort of groundbreaking guidance that will magically empower me to instantly pick up the pieces of my life. Over time my patience for these platitudes has shrunk significantly. Instead of being comforted by a friend’s/acquaintance’s/stranger’s words, I feel a flash of annoyance as I try ...

There are two things about me that continue to have a significant impact on my life: (1) I spend a LOT of time on the internet; and (2) I have spent a LOT of that time ...

WSJ writer James Taranto blames intoxicated rape victims for their own assaults

*Trigger warning*

James Taranto’s made up War on Men persists. In his column for the Wall Street Journal yesterday, Taranto went even further than Emily “drunk women should expect to be assaulted” Yoffe.

He argued that women who drink and are forced to have sex against their will are not only at fault for their assault, but are equally guilty of a crime.

What is called the problem of “sexual assault” on campus is in large part a problem of reckless alcohol consumption, by men and women alike.

*Trigger warning*

James Taranto’s made up War on Men persists. In his column for the Wall Street Journal yesterday, Taranto went even further than Emily “drunk women should expect to be assaulted” Yoffe.

He argued that women who ...

Im-not-victim-blaming-She-just-shouldnt-have-walked-down-there-on-her-own

Feministing Chat: Individualism, violence, and victim blaming

At this point, the cycle is familiar. A commentator writes an article telling women how they can avoid rape through individualistic, ineffective methods. Dress conservatively! Shout loudly! Stay sober! The piece never addresses how we, as a community, can resist violence, and it shifts the focus from perpetrators’ wrongdoings to the “mistakes” of survivors. In response, the feminist internet rises up to condemn the victim-blaming. The fury dies down and, a few weeks later, another, similar article emerges again.

In these reactive conversations, we rarely get the chance to dig deeper and proactively consider the roots and harms of victim blaming. We sat down (at our individual computers, thousands of miles from ...

At this point, the cycle is familiar. A commentator writes an article telling women how they can avoid rape through individualistic, ineffective methods. Dress conservatively! Shout loudly! Stay sober! The piece never addresses ...

Quick Hit: Alexandra and Mychal discuss rape, alcohol, and victim blaming in The New York Times

In response to the recent uproar over Emily Yoffe’s victim-blaming advice to young women, the New York Times “Room for Debate” asks, “What’s wrong with asking women not to get blind drunk?” (As Jessica noted on Twitter, the image included in the piece of “headless shots of young women’s breasts & drinks sends a clear message before you even get to the ‘debate.'”) Thankfully, our own Alexandra and Mychal have some answers! They both offered their smart takes on sexual assault, drinking, and victim blaming.

In response to the recent uproar over Emily Yoffe’s victim-blaming advice to young women, the New York Times “Room for Debate” asks, “What’s wrong with asking women not to get blind drunk?” (As

Weekly Feminist Gif: when Emily Yoffe publishes a “response” to her critics…

Because victim-blaming is some wack shit and I really can’t stomach any more.

Mychal Denzel Smith is a Knobler Fellow at The Nation Institute and is really, really, really, really, really, really sick of victim-blaming.

Because victim-blaming is some wack shit and I really can’t stomach any more.

Mychal Denzel Smith is a Knobler Fellow at The Nation Institute and is really, really, really, really, really, really sick of victim-blaming.

Quick hit: Roxane Gay on that advice column


*Trigger warning*

I’m not going to link to it here, because it was cynical, atrocious link bait, but if you want to go find the Slate advice column about how women can just magically stop rapists from raping by not getting drunk, you can go do that. But


*Trigger warning*

I’m not going to link to it here, because it was cynical, atrocious link bait, but if you want to go find the Slate advice column about how women can just magically stop rapists ...

“Dear Prudence” columnist publishes rape denialism manifesto advising women to “stop getting drunk”

Emily Yoffe aka Slate advice columnist “Prudence” is a rape denialist. We’ve known this for years because she repeatedly denies clear instances of rape in her advice column. But until she published this morning’s rape denialism manifesto on Slate, lamenting that a “misplaced fear of blaming the victim has made it somehow unacceptable” to warn women of the dangers of drinking, we didn’t know just how bad it actually was. 

Emily Yoffe aka Slate advice columnist “Prudence” is a rape denialist. We’ve known this for years because she repeatedly denies clear instances of rape in her advice column. But until she published this morning’s rape denialism ...

Women: stop getting yourselves sexually harassed!

When I saw the following headline, I thought I had accidentally stumbled onto The Onion website:

Formal complaints over sexism should be last resort for women:  The negative impact of formal reporting outweighs any benefits, writes a lawyer. Instead, define your boundaries early on.

But no, I was on The Guardian’s website, in a section called “Women in Leadership,” no less. Since Women in Leadership defines itself as  a “community” which “discuss[es] the lack of women at the top and what we can do to change this,” I was sure that the op-ed they posted on Tuesday wasn’t as sexist and ridiculous as it seemed. So, I read the whole thing, waiting for the moment when the author would ...

When I saw the following headline, I thought I had accidentally stumbled onto The Onion website:

Formal complaints over sexism should be last resort for women:  The negative impact of formal reporting outweighs any benefits, writes a ...

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