Posts Tagged Twitter

Why feminists need to demand a more diverse Twitter

Yet another day, yet another reveal that the demographics of a large tech company are, well, pretty much what we thought they were — heavily male, mostly white. Yesterday, Twitter announced that its workforce is 70 percent men to 30 percent women, as well as 59 percent white, 29 percent Asian, 2 percent Black, and 3 percent Latin@. 

Like its peers Google, Yahoo!, and Facebook, Twitter has publicly declared its commitment to improving these numbers: “By becoming more transparent with our employee data, open in dialogue throughout the company and rigorous in our recruiting, hiring and promotion practices, we are making diversity an important business issue for ourselves.” In other words, Twitter is about to start Leaning ...

Yet another day, yet another reveal that the demographics of a large tech company are, well, pretty much what we thought they were — heavily male, mostly white. Yesterday, Twitter announced that its workforce is 

Feministing Follow Friday: Inanimate objects and a bird

Yesterday was a pretty rough day for anyone who cares about abortion access. So, for this week’s Feministing Follow Friday, in honor of self-care and in recognition of the fact that everything is the worst, here are Twitter accounts by/about four inanimate objects and one bird. They make me feel a little better.

Yesterday was a pretty rough day for anyone who cares about abortion access. So, for this week’s Feministing Follow Friday, in honor of self-care and in recognition of the fact that everything is the ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New Yorker and square Slate reviews, and an article in The Toast on the unsubtle heterosexism of said all male-authored reviews. Even after reading the book twice in private, it was difficult to experience her work separate from its online reception.

Perhaps this is fitting. Lockwood is arguably most well-known for her poem “Rape Joke,” which traveled meme-like across the web last year like no poem ever has, and anticipated its own hype: “The rape joke is if you write a poem called ...

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New ...

Feministing Follow Friday: Feminist Lawyers, Vol. II

Last week, in honor of a Very Important Event in National Feminist News (me finishing my last law school final), we put together a list of five feminist legal Twitter accounts for the Feministing Follow Friday. Today we’re back with some more:

Last week, in honor of a Very Important Event in National Feminist News (me finishing my last law school final), we put together a list of five feminist legal Twitter accounts for the Feministing ...

Feministing Follow Friday: Feminist Lawyers, Vol. I

I’ve been on hiatus from my Feministing duties for the last two weeks for law schools finals — and I have to tell you, it feels good to be done with 1L exams and back to the blogosphere. I still have law on the brain, though, so here are five feminist twitter accounts run by lawyers and legal academics:

I’ve been on hiatus from my Feministing duties for the last two weeks for law schools finals — and I have to tell you, it feels good to be done with 1L exams and back to ...

Quick Hit: An online forum on Twitter feminism

At The Nation, Andrea Smith, Mariame Kaba, Roxane Gay and our own Lori Adelman respond to Michelle Goldberg’s controversial piece on feminism’s so-called Twitter wars, and reflect on the role of Twitter and intra-movement disagreement as feminism grows and evolves. Check it out.

At The Nation, Andrea Smith, Mariame Kaba, Roxane Gay and our own Lori Adelman respond to Michelle Goldberg’s controversial piece on feminism’s so-called Twitter wars, and reflect on the role of Twitter and intra-movement disagreement as ...

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