Posts Tagged transnational feminism

Photo of the Day: Moroccan women protest Prime Minister’s call for them to stay at home

Apparently, the hypocrisy of social conservatives who blame all social ills ever on working mothers knows no borders.

Last week, Moroccan Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane gave a speech urging women to basically get back in the kitchen like they did in the good old days. “Don’t you realise that when women went to work outside, the light went out of their homes?” he said. “We will continue to defend our position against this modernity that is trying to eliminate family in our lives by reversing the roles of men and women. To that we say ‘no!'”

Apparently, the hypocrisy of social conservatives who blame all social ills ever on working mothers knows no borders.

Last week, Moroccan Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane gave a speech urging women to basically get back ...

Photo of the Day: Nigerians demand the government #BringBackOurGirls

Today, protestors gathered in the Nigerian capitol of Abuja to demand the government do more to rescue the 200 teenage girls who were kidnapped two weeks ago while taking an exam at their school in northeastern Nigeria. Most assume the girls were taken by Boko Haram, a local Islamic extremist group whose name means “western education is forbidden.” As The New Yorker reports, the girls’ “only offense, it seems, was attending school.”

Today, protestors gathered in the Nigerian capitol of Abuja to demand the government do more to rescue the 200 teenage girls who were kidnapped two weeks ago while taking an exam at their school in northeastern Nigeria. ...

Quote of the Day: Malala calls out President Obama on drone strikes

Though she didn’t win the Nobel Peace prize, Malala Yousafzai did get a meeting with the Obamas last week, and she didn’t shy away from criticizing US drone policy. She recalled,

“I thanked President Obama for the United States’ work in supporting education in Pakistan and Afghanistan and for Syrian refugees. I also expressed my concerns that drone attacks are fueling terrorism. Innocent victims are killed in these acts, and they lead to resentment among the Pakistani people. If we refocus efforts on education it will make a big impact.”

As Omid Safi points out this post at Religion News Service, Malala, like so many Muslim reformers and other activists in ...

Though she didn’t win the Nobel Peace prize, Malala Yousafzai did get a meeting with the Obamas last week, and she didn’t shy away from criticizing US drone ...

Five men charged with murder in Indian gang rape case

Watch this great Democracy Now segment on the reaction to India’s gang rape case.

By now, you’ve probably heard that the young woman who was brutally raped on a bus in New Delhi two weeks ago died from her injuries. Today, five of her attackers have officially been charged with murder, rape, and other crimes and could face the death penalty.

Public protests have continued throughout India since the woman’s death. As Nilanjana Roy writes, in a country world where violence against women is routine, there is occasionally “one that gets through the armour that we build around ourselves” and comes to be a symbol–a reason to say “enough.” It seems this case could be that tipping point in India.

The ...

Watch this great Democracy Now segment on the reaction to India’s gang rape case.

By now, you’ve probably heard that the young woman who was brutally raped on a bus in New Delhi two weeks ago 

A New Day in Politics: Complicated conversations about Muslim women’s rights

I have been heartened by the substantive conversation happening in thought leadership publications about the plight of women in predominantly Arab and Muslim nations. Referring to Muslim women as people with desires, agency, needs and destinies is a new direction in how “the West” has ever talked about the real lives of women within these cultural contexts. But despite this continued desire to have these conversations–larger narratives about Muslim women and their bodies and Western intervention still dictate how these conversations play out.

Much of this was spurred by Mona Eltahawy’s controversial piece in Foreign Policy linked in yesterday’s Weekly Feminist Reader that came out last week called “Why do they hate us?” Her argument is pretty provocative calling out the ...

I have been heartened by the substantive conversation happening in thought leadership publications about the plight of women in predominantly Arab and Muslim nations. Referring to Muslim women as people with desires, agency, needs and destinies is a new ...