Posts Tagged transformative justice

Screenshot of webpage: RAINN Recommends White House Focus on Criminal Justice Response to College Rape

RAINN’s recommendations ignore needs of campus survivors of all identities

Recently, the Rape Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) issued recommendations to the White House on how to properly respond to college rape. Seeing the title of the page–RAINN Recommends White House Focus on Criminal Justice Response to College Rape–instantly made me panic. I’m an organizer with ED ACT NOW, a national campaign calling for better federal enforcement of Title IX, and have worked and met with many survivors and activists. I have had the opportunity to hear a wide range of reasons as to why survivors have turned to their schools, rather than the police, to address the sexual violence they endured. One of the most frequently-used reasons I have heard – especially ...

Recently, the Rape Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) issued recommendations to the White House on how to properly respond to college rape. Seeing the title of the page–RAINN Recommends White House ...

The Wednesday Weigh-In: Is public shaming a good alternative to incarceration?

This is definitely a slippery slope. But when I read about Cleveland Municipal Court Judge Pinkey Carr sentencing those found guilty in his courtroom to public shamings I thought to myself: I’d take it. Although I’ve never been sentenced to jail time, I’ve spent more than enough time behind bars (2 days to be exact; college) to know that some time on a corner with a sign is a better option.

There is are definitely some critique of the practices, especially those concerning the safety of those placed on public display after committing crimes that involve other people. Also, understanding that people of color are often disproportionately targeted and policed by law enforcement, this practice could easily become ...

This is definitely a slippery slope. But when I read about Cleveland Municipal Court Judge Pinkey Carr sentencing those found guilty in his courtroom to public shamings I thought to myself: I’d take it. ...

Quick Hit: Transforming community responses to rape

Rebecca Nagle of FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture has a great post at Everyday Feminism about the challenges of publicly supporting survivors of sexual violence. She writes:

Currently, we have plenty of models for how individuals can support survivors of rape.

Feminists have built and maintained crisis centers, hotlines, and emergency services. Anti-violence organizations have created excellent how-to’s and information guides for friends and families. Counselors and therapists are trained to help rape survivors recover from trauma.

While there is still work to be done to provide survivors with adequate services, our culture understands the need for these services.

And this is all a great start.

But until we create public spaces where the experiences of survivors are honored, Americans’ reactions will ...

Rebecca Nagle of FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture has a great post at Everyday Feminism about the challenges of publicly supporting survivors of sexual violence. She writes:

Currently, we have plenty of models for how ...

SAFER Carolina

The radical potential and great disappointment of school sexual misconduct boards

In a development that surprised exactly no one who has been following the recent stories of mishandled sexual violence reports at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights has agreed to investigate the school’s policies and practices.

The investigation is prompted by a complaint filed in January by UNC students, alumni, and a former administrator. Although the complaint is not a law suit, and the DOE almost never finds schools “out of compliance”—preferring a collaborative reform process rather than fines—the OCR can refer cases to the Department of Justice if it finds evidence of criminal administrative behavior that a bureaucratic investigation cannot resolve.

The New York Times has a generally ...

In a development that surprised exactly no one who has been following the recent stories of mishandled sexual violence reports at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Department of Education’s Office of ...