Posts Tagged transfeminism

Queer and trans youth of color in NOLA demand accountability from police

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, it will not come as a surprise to you that queer and trans people of color are routinely targeted by the police.

We Deserve Better, a new report by BreakOUT! — a badass organization working to end the criminalization of LGBTQ youth in New Orleans — highlights exactly the ways queer and trans youth experience discriminatory policing at the hands of the NOPD. Perhaps most importantly, We Deserve Better also highlights the resiliency of these criminalized communities, and makes common-sense demands to address issues of safety.

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, it will not come as a surprise to you that queer and trans people of color are routinely targeted by

Trial By Press Release: Jane Doe and Connecticut’s carceral crisis

Trans people are patriarchy’s constitutional crisis. Our very existence presents the gender order with an unfixable problem that is impossible to discipline back into its neat boundaries, save through the most extreme of actions.

The Connecticut State Department of Children and Familes (DCF) has created just such a crisis in the case of Jane Doe, the 16 year old trans Latina who was bounced from the DCF system into prison without charges or trial because of alleged violence. On July 13, she was quietly moved to a boy’s facility and returned to a solitary confinement situation because she had allegedly become violent again at the Pueblo Girls’ Detention Facility in Connecticut, while her transfer to a girls’ treatment centre in Massachusetts ...

Trans people are patriarchy’s constitutional crisis. Our very existence presents the gender order with an unfixable problem that is impossible to discipline back into its neat boundaries, save through the most extreme of actions.

The Connecticut State Department ...

No One is Disposable: #JusticeForJane and why dignity is a human right

As of this writing, seventy one days have passed since Jane Doe was unjustly incarcerated in the Connecticut State Prison by a government body charged with protecting her—a vulnerable, sixteen year old trans girl.

To recap her situation: Jane Doe was a ward of Connecticut State’s Department of Children and Families (DCF) for much of her life, but according to the DCF’s commissioner, Joette Katz, became violent and unruly. Her transgender status also, allegedly, complicated her placement in alternate facilities. So, the DCF availed itself of statute 17a-12: an obscure law that allows it to place children in the Connecticut State prison system.

Thus it was that she was sent to the York Correctional Facility for Adult Women in Niantic, ...

As of this writing, seventy one days have passed since Jane Doe was unjustly incarcerated in the Connecticut State Prison by a government body charged with protecting her—a vulnerable, sixteen year old trans girl.

To recap her ...

(Note: This is in no way photoshopped; it's his actual podcast) Credit to ESPN.com.

Nowhere for trans women to hide: What Bill Simmons’ apology gets right and so very wrong

Freelance journalist Caleb Hannan’s Grantland feature on the reclusive inventor of a golf club, which I wrote about earlier this week, caused a dam to break online; the inventor he researched against her will, Essay Anne Vanderbilt, was a trans woman who had—allegedly—lied about her educational credentials. Despite a pledge on Hannan’s part to write only about the science of her golf club, Dr. V found herself threatened with exposure of her trans status, a history she had worked tirelessly to suppress. She killed herself three months before Hannan’s article about her went to press.

Now Grantland’s editor in chief, Bill Simmons, has apologised at some length, focusing chiefly on the editorial process that produced the ...

Freelance journalist Caleb Hannan’s Grantland feature on the reclusive inventor of a golf club, which I wrote about earlier this week, caused a dam to break online; the inventor he researched against ...

Thank you Thursdays: Laverne Cox talks gender justice in new interview

Orange Is the New Black actress Laverne Cox has a fabulous interview over at The Nation that’s really worth checking out, and it made me think of how thankful I am for her current presence in the spotlight. She tackles several issues, but I really love what she has to say on gender justice:

Rather than equality, it’s about justice. What does justice look like for trans and gender non-conforming people? I know that for some trans folks, a lot of them may not want to put that they’re transgender on a form. But then sometimes it does become important to claim that identity. It’s about giving folks the freedom to self-identify. How do we have gender freedom for everyone? ...

Orange Is the New Black actress Laverne Cox has a fabulous interview over at The Nation that’s really worth checking out, and it made me think of how thankful I am for her current presence in ...

Mind the gap: September is Abortion Access Month

This post has been co-written by Eesha Pandit and Verónica Bayetti Flores.

What does it really take to get an abortion in America?

September is Abortion Access Month, and an important time to think about this question. As it turns out, it takes quite a bit to get an abortion in this country, and as states across the nation pile on waiting periods, ultrasound requirements, bans, and other barriers, accessing safe and legal abortion care is becoming more difficult by the day. One of the biggest hurdles for folks seeking abortion care is the fact that, for many, it is quite simply unaffordable. Who are the folks that cannot afford abortion care?

Outside of our paid gigs, we serve on the ...

This post has been co-written by Eesha Pandit and Verónica Bayetti Flores.

What does it really take to get an abortion in America?

September is Abortion Access Month, and an important time to think about this question. As ...

On trans issues within feminism and strengthening the movement’s gender analysis

I’ve taken some time away from blogging while I’ve been in grad school, and it’s given me an opportunity for some perspective on the feminist blogosphere. I started working at Feministing in 2009 with a goal of centering trans issues within feminism. I think the oppression trans folks face, particularly the extreme marginalization and violence aimed at trans women in this misogynist culture, is exactly what feminism can exist to change. I understand feminism as a response to gendered oppression in a patriarchal context, where femininity is devalued. I see the worst of our gender hierarchy landing on the shoulders of folks who fail to meet the strict rules of the compulsory gender binary in a way that’s perceived as feminine. This ...

I’ve taken some time away from blogging while I’ve been in grad school, and it’s given me an opportunity for some perspective on the feminist blogosphere. I started working at Feministing in 2009 with a goal of ...

CLPP 2011: Transfeminisms

explores trans and gender justice activism, reproductive rights, feminism, and the connections between our movements. How does transmysogyny affect all of our communities? How can we build strong connections among trans communities? Panelists will discuss their experiences with community building, movement building, representation, connecting with allies, and infusing gender justice into our understanding of feminisms.

“I fucking love gender.” -Jos Truitt

This panel featured Jules Rosskam, teacher and filmmaker, Jos Truitt, our very own blogger and activist, and Toni Olin-Mignosa, beautician and activist.

It sought to address, among other things, the ways trans people are policed around norms, and how the struggle against this policing is closely tied to the larger reproductive justice movement.

Jos gave a fantastic presentation on the ...

explores trans and gender justice activism, reproductive rights, feminism, and the connections between our movements. How does transmysogyny affect all of our communities? How can we build strong connections among trans communities? Panelists will discuss their experiences ...