Posts Tagged The New York Times

Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

Feminist in-fighting is still a problem.

Why aren’t men funny?

Newsrooms should also hire a few journalists who aren’t effete liberal p*ssies.

A class analysis of Jason Collins’ announcement.

“Natural” isn’t always feminist.

Newsflash, Fox News: teen sex isn’t illegal.

Bloomberg can’t defend “stop and frisk” policies.

One fake rape threat doesn’t mean all women “cry rape.”

Don’t punish sexually active girls with pregnancies.

Exploring verbal consent… through The Vampire Diaries.

The New York Times confuses rape and sex in a headline, issues a correction.

Dartmouth survivors face a tough judicial process.

Racialicious: The Hippocratic Oath doesn’t apply to undocumented immigrants.

Watch to the end of this

Feminist in-fighting is still a problem.

Why aren’t men funny?

Newsrooms should also hire a few journalists who aren’t effete liberal p*ssies.

A class analysis of Jason Collins’ announcement.

“Natural” isn’t always feminist.

Newsflash, ...

SAFER Carolina

The radical potential and great disappointment of school sexual misconduct boards

In a development that surprised exactly no one who has been following the recent stories of mishandled sexual violence reports at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights has agreed to investigate the school’s policies and practices.

The investigation is prompted by a complaint filed in January by UNC students, alumni, and a former administrator. Although the complaint is not a law suit, and the DOE almost never finds schools “out of compliance”—preferring a collaborative reform process rather than fines—the OCR can refer cases to the Department of Justice if it finds evidence of criminal administrative behavior that a bureaucratic investigation cannot resolve.

The New York Times has a generally ...

In a development that surprised exactly no one who has been following the recent stories of mishandled sexual violence reports at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Department of Education’s Office of ...

Quick Hit: The NYT on restorative justice

Paul Tullis has a haunting piece in the New York Times on the role of forgiveness in the criminal justice system–explored through the aftermath of a devastating murder of a young woman, Ann Grosmaire, by her boyfriend Conor McBridge. The long article is a really tough read, but I appreciate that Tullis explores restorative justice through the response to an unquestionably terrible crime; too often, I fear, alternatives to traditional carceral approaches are discussed only for minor offenses like drug use and petty theft, which allows everyone, from defenders of the prison system to abolitionists, to avoid the hardest questions.

The details of the Ann’s killer’s sentencing process and punishment will likely only satisfy moderate reformers, but testimonies from the Grosmaire ...

Paul Tullis has a haunting piece in the New York Times on the role of forgiveness in the criminal justice system–explored through the aftermath of a devastating murder of a young woman, Ann Grosmaire, by her boyfriend ...

Quick Hit: The woman behind the SCOTUS DOMA case

Today The New York Times published a profile of Edith Windsor, a friendly-looking 83-year-old New Yorker in pink and pearls whose fight against the Defense of Marriage Act, which “requires the federal government to deny marital benefits to gay and lesbian couples who live in states that allow such unions,” has made it to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The article covers Windsor’s 40-year relationship with her late wife Thea Spyer and touches on the tricky matter of why the couple’s lasting commitment made this the ideal case, whether we like it or not, for lawyers to win over conservative judges:

…Legal experts said that [Windsor's] age, the length and depth of her relationship, the way it can be viewed as a ...

Today The New York Times published a profile of Edith Windsor, a friendly-looking 83-year-old New Yorker in pink and pearls whose fight against the Defense of Marriage Act, which “requires the federal government to deny marital ...

In defense of irony

Christy Wampole wants us to live without irony. In her weekend essay for the New York TimesOpinionator section, the Princeton lit professor encourages all of us—not just hipsters—to recognize the paucity of sincerity in contemporary American culture and  “determine whether the ashes of irony have settled on you as well.”

The essay’s been getting a lot of play, popping up again and again on my Twitter and Facebook, and there certainly are points to be admired, particularly from a feminist perspective. While I think irony and apathy are often unfairly conflated, Walpole is right that irony, often a mark of privilege, can dampen political enthusiasm and discourage progress—a point stressed in a number of recent pieces

Christy Wampole wants us to live without irony. In her weekend essay for the New York TimesOpinionator section, the Princeton lit professor encourages all of us—not just hipsters—to recognize the paucity of sincerity in contemporary ...