Posts Tagged social media

About that dad’s social media discipline: Sometimes it ain’t that deep

This week, ever vigilant “Feminist Twitter” has been abuzz about a black father in Louisville, Kentucky who posted these photos (and caption) of his daughter after he found out that she had broken several of his house rules. The critique and skepticism of this man’s form of discipline have ranged from claiming it was unnecessary and counterproductive in the face of the “real” issues that this girl must have, to calling it slut-shaming and emotionally abusive. The general sentiment seems to be that posting pictures of his daughter online invokes a disciplinary tradition of humiliation that can only be harmful. How I do I feel about it? Well, my personal opinion is that: it ain’t that deep.

This week, ever vigilant “Feminist Twitter” has been abuzz about a black father in Louisville, Kentucky who posted these photos (and caption) of his daughter after he found out that she had broken several of ...

Jada

Stand with Jada

*Trigger warning*

There’s no good reason we should know the name of 16-year-old Jada.

The only reason we do is that after she was drugged and raped at a party of a fellow high school student in Houston, her assault went viral–a phrase I hope to never have occasion to write ever again. Jada had no idea what happened to her that night until she started seeing images and videos being passed around on social media and got texts from friends asking if she was ok. Then–with almost unimaginable callousness–her peers started mocking her assault by posting images of themselves lying on the floor in the same pose as Jada’s unconscious body under the hashtag #jadapose. (I will not be linking to ...

*Trigger warning*

There’s no good reason we should know the name of 16-year-old Jada.

The only reason we do is that after she was drugged and raped at a party of a fellow high school student in Houston, ...

How I’m learning to appreciate different bodies

Last weekend my dad and I got into a conversation about bodies. While cleaning up the kitchen, we started talking about weight and body image, and for the first time possibly ever, I came out of that conversation feeling OK. No tears, no rushing to a mirror, no internal promises to start a diet tomorrow.

This would not have been the case last year.

My father and I have always fought about what bodies he accepts as “healthy” or attractive. I am very close with my dad, so these conversations usually leave me feeling all kinds of angry, but also guilty. In spite of my best attempts to come at them with empathy, I tend to jump in with my fists raised, ...

Last weekend my dad and I got into a conversation about bodies. While cleaning up the kitchen, we started talking about weight and body image, and for the first time possibly ever, I came out of that ...

Update: The #WeAreAllMonkeys banana selfie campaign was a planned marking stunt

It turns out that Dani Alves’ witty reaction to a banana being thrown onto the soccer field that I wrote about earlier this week was a planned marketing stunt.

I don’t know about you, but I think this speaks to why the ensuing social media reaction felt like such a hollow campaign. What’s troubling to me is not that it was somewhat staged, but that in the planning, no one thought of anything more substantive. Jude Wanga wrote a good piece on the topic, and what actions could have actually been taken: 

It turns out that Dani Alves’ witty reaction to a banana being thrown onto the soccer field that I wrote about earlier this week was a planned marketing stunt.

I don’t know about you, ...

Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

Gorgeous new video from Tribe Called Red featuring modern depictions of indigenous women.

In memory of Karyn Washington, founder for “For Brown Girls,” who committed suicide this week.

Trans girl teen held in Connecticut adult men’s prison without charges.

DOJ releases guidance on VAWA protections for trans survivors of sexual violence.

 

Gorgeous new video from Tribe Called Red featuring modern depictions of indigenous women.

In memory of Karyn Washington, founder for “For Brown Girls,” who committed suicide this week.

Trans girl teen held in ...

What about the fatties? Feminist ramblings on @PostBigFines

As a card-carrying member of Black Twitter and a self-identified (and sometimes non-consensually labeled) fat girl, I have a love/hate relationship with @PostBigFines. This Twitter account — originally named @PostBigBitches — follows the trend of admiration sites like @PostBadBitches, @PostBadTatts, and my personal favorite @PostBadBeards (swoons). As mentioned in their bio, PostBigFines is a place to admire women of “all levels of thickness.”

For Black Twitter, PostBigFines (PBF) is sort of a direct response to PostBadBitches, which has set the standard for which women are “bad” and those who aren’t. Many of the women on PBB are light-skinned women of color, adorned in contrasting Louboutins and/or Forever 21 dresses, and definitely under a ...

As a card-carrying member of Black Twitter and a self-identified (and sometimes non-consensually labeled) fat girl, I have a love/hate relationship with @PostBigFines. This Twitter account — originally named @PostBigBitches — follows the trend of ...

Our Days of Rage: What #CancelColbert reveals about women/of color and controversial speech

Content Warning: This article uses screenshots of extremely bigoted tweets to illustrate what it describes; thanks goes out to Twitter user @jennybaquing for screen-capping them, and John Weeks for Storifying them.

When a woman dares to speak her mind online, it can seem as if a thousand Gorgon visages rise to counter her violation of the expected order.

The surge of online hatred directed at Suey Park (and many of the women of color who defended her) for her #CancelColbert hashtag this week is disturbingly similar to other incidents involving outspoken women online. Taken together, they illustrate how women do not have a right to be controversial or equal participants in public discourse — or, put another way, that controversy ...

Content Warning: This article uses screenshots of extremely bigoted tweets to illustrate what it describes; thanks goes out to Twitter user @jennybaquing for screen-capping them, and John Weeks for Storifying them.

When a woman dares to speak ...

Weekly Feminist Reader

Malia and Sasha in the White House: dangerous narrative about the progress of African-American girls.

Social media, teens, moral panic, and the sexual predators that “lurk everywhere”.

Cooking skills and farm vegetables in inner-city Washington D.C.

Beyonce is asking ‘how come,and so am I.”

Corporate sponsors flee from Boston’s homophobic St. Patrick’s Day parade.

Why Lupita Nyong’o should be the star of  the new Star Wars

Malia and Sasha in the White House: dangerous narrative about the progress of African-American girls.

Social media, teens, moral panic, and the sexual predators that “lurk everywhere”.

Cooking skills and farm vegetables in ...

Load More