Posts Tagged Sex Work

Weekly Feminist Reader

Patrick Stewart answers a fan’s unexpected question.

Sex workers engage in democratic political processes. Duh.

It’s not just Facebook that has an online hate speech problem.

Donate to Transgender Studies Quarterly.

Jessica writes about #FBrape as a potential feminist tipping point at The Nation.

A letter to the President on the anniversary of Dr. Tiller’s murder.

Bye, Bachmann.

A victim of the New Orleans Mother’s Day shooting will celebrate his 11th birthday in style.

Could you use support on the anniversary of your assault?

TV loves dead teenage girls.

Do Disney Princess movies pass the Bechdel test?

“What does it say about pride parade events that lesbians ...

Patrick Stewart answers a fan’s unexpected question.

Sex workers engage in democratic political processes. Duh.

It’s not just Facebook that has an online hate speech problem.

Donate to Transgender Studies Quarterly.

Jessica writes ...

A hip hop feminist questions the “male gaze”

The “male gaze” is one of the many concepts that dominates feminist discourse. It’s one of the first things that feminists learn about when talking about women in media, entertainment, arts, performance, or anywhere else women are to be physically looked upon. This gaze defines the way in which women are visually represented for the heteronormative pleasure of an assumed male audience. The male gaze is problematic for several reasons. It objectifies and commodifies women and their bodies, removing women from their lived experiences and lives. The male gaze oftentimes offers unrealistic and harmful representations of women, creating standards of beauty that marginalize most women. But perhaps most significantly, it dominants much of our modern visual culture, institutionalizing sexist representations ...

The “male gaze” is one of the many concepts that dominates feminist discourse. It’s one of the first things that feminists learn about when talking about women in media, entertainment, arts, performance, or anywhere else women are ...

Weekly Feminist Reader

Urge the White House to recognize non-binary genders.

Five-year-old girl names dinosaur… after herself.

Why didn’t Abigail Fisher get into UT?

Support the #NotBuyingIt app!

Stop fat shaming Kim Kardashian.

A response to Chloe’s piece on “bad” bodies and “bad” feminists.

A Horace School alum speaks out about sexual abuse at the school (reported on last year by the New York Times).

On selfies.

Akiba Solomon on the value of echo chambers.

The ethics of public shaming.

The enthusiastic consent standard and sex work: “You can’t make me like it.”

The women profiled in Lisa Miller’s “feminist housewives” piece say they were misquoted.

A

Urge the White House to recognize non-binary genders.

Five-year-old girl names dinosaur… after herself.

Why didn’t Abigail Fisher get into UT?

Support the #NotBuyingIt app!

Stop fat shaming Kim Kardashian.

A

Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

Students at the University of Michigan are launching a campaign to stop the “silent epidemic” of campus sexual assault.

Akiba Solomon is Colorlines’ new managing editor.

history of “female-friendly” porn.

Today’s news on voter suppression.

Sometimes I hate Frank Bruni, but his objection to the Catholic Church’s misogynistic hypocrisy is spot-on.

The Nation suggests ten ways you can combat rape culture (with the help of Feministing co-founder Jessica and contributor Eesha.)

Why personhood legislation isn’t passing.

Take care of yourself, activists.

Homosexuality is apparently basically exactly the same as shooting heroin.

It’s always the women’s fault: Egyptian PM says unclean breasts cause diarrhea.

Students at the University of Michigan are launching a campaign to stop the “silent epidemic” of campus sexual assault.

Akiba Solomon is Colorlines’ new managing editor.

history of “female-friendly” porn.

Today’s news on

The way we talk about sex work is changing, but the way we treat sex workers is not

As I reflect on the The International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, which was on December 17, 2 Chainz comes to mind.

I listen to “I Luv Dem Strippers” everyday. Seriously. It took me more than a few listens to realize, however, that the lyrics (aside from the chorus) have absolutely nothing to do with strippers. The song is about how rich 2 Chainz and featured artist Nicki Minaj are. One has to wonder how we got to this point? Stripping is the new black and the exchange of sex(uality) for money is becoming a more glamorous narrative everyday.

In the kind of consumer culture where luxurious goods mean everything and nothing at the same time, the way we are ...

As I reflect on the The International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, which was on December 17, 2 Chainz comes to mind.

I listen to “I Luv Dem Strippers” everyday. Seriously. It took me more than ...

Quick hit: By conflating sex work with trafficking, CA’s newly passed Prop 35 does more harm than good

“Under Prop 35, anyone involved in the sex trade could potentially be viewed as being involved in trafficking, and could face all of the criminal penalties associated with this redefinition of who is involved in “trafficking,” which include fines of between $500,000 and $1 million and prison sentences ranging from five years to life. This is in addition to having to register as a sex offender, and surrender to lifelong internet monitoring: that is, turning over all of one’s “internet identifiers,” which includes “any electronic mail address, user name, screen name, or similar identifier used for the purpose of Internet forum discussions, Internet chat room discussion, instant messaging, social networking, or similar Internet communication….

Advocates say Prop 35’s conflation of the ...

“Under Prop 35, anyone involved in the sex trade could potentially be viewed as being involved in trafficking, and could face all of the criminal penalties associated with this redefinition of who is involved in “trafficking,” which ...

(Un)feminist guilty pleasure: I don’t want to critique Magic Mike

Feministing used to run an “(Un)feminist guilty pleasure” series. I liked it – the posts inherently acknowledged the complexities of living as a feminist in an overwhelmingly anti-feminist world. There’s an increasing preasure in the blogosphere to always get it right, to be the perfect feminist, which is impossible and unrealistic – and frankly dangerous for a movement that’s supposed to move in reality. So I’m bringing it back.

Cause I don’t want to overthink Magic Mike.

There’s a ton of critique out there. I’m sure some of it is on point (though not the ones I skimmed). Yes, equal opportunity objectification is actually a problem. Sure, there are no real lady characters except The Kid’s sister, who only registers because ...

Feministing used to run an “(Un)feminist guilty pleasure” series. I liked it – the posts inherently acknowledged the complexities of living as a feminist in an overwhelmingly anti-feminist world. There’s an increasing preasure in the blogosphere ...

Condom policing in New York

These days, there’s a fairly broad consensus– among public health advocates,  educators, parents, the media, and the porn industry— that condoms are GOOD. Whether one is penis-possessing or just along for the ride, most of us have been told to “wrap it up” since before we were performing acts that required us to do so. So why in the world do New York City police think it’s OK to confiscate condoms from some people — in particular, women suspected of prostitution — and actually use them as evidence against them in court?

As this article explains:

“Last year, New York City health workers gave out 37.2 million condoms. That works out to an average of 70 condoms every minute of ...

These days, there’s a fairly broad consensus– among public health advocates,  educators, parents, the media, and the porn industry— that condoms are GOOD. Whether one is penis-possessing or just along for the ride, most of us ...

Load More