Posts Tagged reading

Toni Morrison

Feministing Reads: Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child

Toni Morrison is a national treasure, and a new Morrison novel is a national event. Superlatives proliferate: she is among our greatest chroniclers of American history, our greatest portraitists of black communal life, our greatest analysts of subjectivity under duress, our greatest institutional advocates for black feminist literature. 

Toni Morrison is a national treasure, and a new Morrison novel is a national event. Superlatives proliferate: she is among our greatest chroniclers of American history, our greatest portraitists of black communal life, our greatest analysts ...

Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

Andrea Grimes has some tips for dudes on how to talk to your guy friends about not threatening to rape and murder women on the internet.

MIT releases a detailed survey on sexual assault on campus.

“I suspect I am not the only woman to become involved with men who profess to value her for her ability to be emotionally present, curious and passionate only to reveal, down the road, an expectation that this sort of generosity of time and energy be restricted solely to interests and activities that include them.” – Anna Holmes

I don’t support feminism if it means murdering all men. Ditto, now that you mention it.

Andrea Grimes has some tips for dudes on how to talk to your guy friends about not threatening to rape and murder women on the internet.

MIT releases a detailed survey on sexual assault ...

Feministing Readz: Land of Love and Drowning

If I were to derive a formula for character development from Land of Love and Drowning, I’d return to watch Eeona rework a central myth in sleep: “She dreamed about a school of women walking out of the ocean. Then she dreamed it again. And again. Until in the dream she was finally one of the women.” Decide what your freest self looks like; conjure it into being; inhabit it as long as it holds. The next morning she wakes, makes her way to sea, and nearly drowns. Abandon and repeat as needed.

The adjectives so far affixed by reviewers to Tiphanie Yanique’s debut novel hold, and bear repeating: “epic,” “ambitious,” and “lush” all recur deservedly. Land follows ...

If I were to derive a formula for character development from Land of Love and Drowning, I’d return to watch Eeona rework a central myth in sleep: “She dreamed about a school of women ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: The Essential Ellen Willis

I owe so much, as a writer and feminist, to Ellen Willis. And given how much of her work has remained uncollected or gone out of print, I suspect that we collectively owe her much more than has yet been accounted for. This month’s publication of The Essential Ellen Willis will, I hope, urge the accounting. Edited by her daughter, journalist Nona Willis Aronowitz, this sprawling book surveys four decades of the cultural critic’s writing, beginning with the emergence of radical feminism in the late 1960s and continuing to the near present. (Willis died in 2006.)  [Ed note: this was at a time when “radical feminism” was more broadly defined and did not mean anti-sex worker and ...

I owe so much, as a writer and feminist, to Ellen Willis. And given how much of her work has remained uncollected or gone out of print, I suspect that we collectively owe her much more ...

Load More