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Feministing Jamz: Mare Advertencia Lirika

Mare Advertencia Lirika is a Zapotec Hip Hop artist from Oaxaca, Mexico whose music speaks out for the rights of indigenous women. Now 27, Lírikan began rapping at age 16, using her lyrics to challenge sexism in her own community and call out the Mexican state for its abysmal treatment of indigenous communities. 

Mare Advertencia Lirika is a Zapotec Hip Hop artist from Oaxaca, Mexico whose music speaks out for the rights of indigenous women. Now 27, Lírikan began rapping at age 16, using her lyrics to challenge sexism in her own community ...

No Type: Trap Feminism Pt. 2

I’ve been thinking a lot about trap feminism and what it means since I first wrote about it in January. In this introductory piece — which was mostly a purge of initial ideas that I had been bouncing back and forth with friends — I identified some of the makings of trap feminism which included an acknowledgement of women as participants and contributors to hip hop and trap music, active agents over their sexuality and bodies, and conscious players in informal/non-institutional financial transactions. Reflecting back now, trap feminism can be applied much more broadly. Today I find myself thinking about trap feminism as a tool used to identify liberating themes in trap music and facets of it’s surrounding ...

I’ve been thinking a lot about trap feminism and what it means since I first wrote about it in January. In this introductory piece — which was mostly a purge of initial ideas that ...

Money talks: Rick Ross releases full apology for rape lyric

So understand this– there’s no more talking to those who perpetuate or enable rape culture. There is only us talking to your money.

— dream hampton (@dreamhampton) April 11, 2013

When we first broke the story about Reebok dropping Rick Ross I had mixed emotions.  I was excited that rape culture was being talked about and taken seriously. I thought that Reebok’s statement about why they chose to drop him was extremely on point. I’ve appreciated that their motives were not aimed at the lyrics themselves, but his refusal to take the issue seriously as reflected in the initial half assed apology. (He has since released a full apology, which can be found here, and is appreciated.)

But ...

So understand this– there’s no more talking to those who perpetuate or enable rape culture. There is only us talking to your money.

— dream hampton (@dreamhampton) April 11, 2013

When we first broke the story about

Breaking: Reebok dumps Rick Ross for date rape lyrics

Rick Ross has reportedly been dumped by Reebok due to lyrics promoting date rape in his recent single “U.O.E.N.O”. The lyrics in question were “Put Molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it. I took her home and I enjoyed that, she ain’t even know it.” The verse has since been replaced on the song. Reebok reportedly cited Ross’ inadequate response as well as the lyrics themselves when discussing their decision. The move comes after almost a week of pressure from women’s rights groups and a widely circulated online petition. TMZ reports:

Reebok tells TMZ … “Reebok holds our partners to a high standard, and we ...

Rick Ross has reportedly been dumped by Reebok due to lyrics promoting date rape in his recent single “U.O.E.N.O”. The lyrics in question were “Put Molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it. I ...

Can an Asian woman be taken seriously in rap?

Answer: This is a stupid question.

New York magazine’s profile of Nora Lum, aka Awkwafina, details the Korean-Chinese-American rapper’s rise from her hilarious “My Vag” track last year to the harder “NYC Bitche$,” which was released in March. The article’s headline asks: “Can an Asian Woman Be Taken Seriously in Rap?”

The piece dabbles in gender identity politics in hip hop. Can women rap? Well, sure. Will it be hard? Duh. Lum says:

“If women dabble in rap but they’re not rappers, to get from dabbling to doing it is really difficult, confidence-wise. There’s a degree of having to prove yourself, also, and that’s really hard: I’m not trying to ruin your institution, I’m trying to ...

Answer: This is a stupid question.

New York magazine’s profile of Nora Lum, aka Awkwafina, details the Korean-Chinese-American rapper’s rise from her hilarious “My Vag” track last year to the harder “NYC ...

Nicki Minaj on sexism in the music industry

Nicki Minaj gives us some straight talk about double standards in the music industry.

There is a lot of room for feminist critique around Nicki Minaj’s creative, visual or verbal choices–but I lay off intense scrutiny because she is the only woman in popular hip-hop. That doesn’t mean those critiques aren’t valid, or I don’t see them, I just see her role as the only woman in mainstream hip-hop as patently unfair and probably dictates a lot of her creative choices.

And I totally appreciate what she is talking about here. For those that say we don’t need feminism anymore–watch someone who probably doesn’t identify as a “feminist” talk about sexism in her industry.

Transcript after the jump, thanks to reader Kelly.

Nicki Minaj gives us some straight talk about double standards in the music industry.

There is a lot of room for feminist critique around Nicki Minaj’s creative, visual or verbal choices–but I lay off intense scrutiny because she ...

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