Posts Tagged Race

Screen Shot 2014-11-11 at 9.08.49 AM

Feministing Chat: On street harassment

Editor’s note: It’s been a couple weeks now since the anti-street harassment organization Hollaback! released that video of a woman getting catcalled 100 times during a day walking the streets of New York City. 

Editor’s note: It’s been a couple weeks now since the anti-street harassment organization Hollaback! released that video of a woman getting catcalled 100 times during a day walking the streets of New York City. 

The Feministing Five: crystal am nelson

crystal am nelson debuted her most recent exhibit “Dark Desires: The Erotic Lives of Black Women” this Friday at the Center for Sex and Culture in San Francisco. The exhibition brings together art, literature, and historical materials to provide a framework on how black women have created, imagined, and self-represented sexual positivity. crystal am nelson collaborated with around ten artists to join her on this examination of black women’s sexuality, and together they have created an incredible exhibit that shows the myriad ways desire extends from sexuality to political and social spheres.

crystal am nelson is both an artist and a scholar. As “Dark Desires” demonstrates, her work combines intensive archival research, collaborative creativity, and thoughtful intention. The exhibit runs ...

crystal am nelson debuted her most recent exhibit “Dark Desires: The Erotic Lives of Black Women” this Friday at the Center for Sex and Culture in San Francisco. The exhibition brings together art, literature, and historical ...

White men make up 31 percent of the population but hold 65 percent of elected offices in the US

A coalition of non-profits called Who Leads Us analyzed the demographics of 42,000 elected officials at all levels of US government to determine just how much political power is concentrated in the hands of white men. Unsurprisingly, the answer is: a shit-ton!

A coalition of non-profits called Who Leads Us analyzed the demographics of 42,000 elected officials at all levels of US government to determine just how much political power is concentrated in the hands of white men. Unsurprisingly, ...

The Feministing Five: Darkmatter

Janani Balasubramanian and Alok Vaid-Menon make up the incredible trans South Asian art and activist collaboration Darkmatter. Masterfully using humor, language, and rhythm, Darkmatter pushes their audience to reflect and take action on racial justice, anti-colonialism, and gender and sexuality politics. Their spoken performances share stories from their childhoods to conversations during their young adult lives, and they invite you to find the poetry in your own world, relationships, and journey toward social justice.

Excitingly, Darkmatter’s brilliance can also be found within their written poetry, prose, interviews, and tweets (seriously, follow them now). Like their individual work, which has been featured in outlets such as Black Girl Dangerous, Racialicious, The New York Times, and Upworthy, Darkmatter’s ...

Janani Balasubramanian and Alok Vaid-Menon make up the incredible trans South Asian art and activist collaboration Darkmatter. Masterfully using humor, language, and rhythm, Darkmatter pushes their audience to reflect and ...

How Bring It! is changing our perception of Black girls and performance

With another season of Lifetime’s show Bring It! behind us, I can’t help but reflect on all the ways in which the show adds nuance to media portrayal of Black girls. The fairly new reality show follows the competition season of a black majorette/dance team — the Dancing Dolls from Jackson, Mississippi. An alternative to the popular show Dance Moms, which focuses on the early careers of individual dancers and the moms who push them, Bring It! highlights the commitment that Black girls have made to dance as a hobby (and in some cases as a career) via the Dancing Dolls. The stories of the dancers, the coach Ms. Diana, and select ...

With another season of Lifetime’s show Bring It! behind us, I can’t help but reflect on all the ways in which the show adds nuance to media portrayal of ...

Chart of the Day: The pay gap for women of color

Earlier this week we got the terribly exciting news that, according to the latest Census numbers, the average American woman now makes 78 cents, instead of 77 cents, to the average dude’s dollar. But, as we know, the gap–which hasn’t improved in a decade–varies a lot by race.

Here’s a chart from ThinkProgress showing how the wages of women of different races compare to those of white men:

Earlier this week we got the terribly exciting news that, according to the latest Census numbers, the average American woman now makes 78 cents, instead of 77 cents, to the average dude’s dollar. But, as ...

Nine years after Katrina, New Orleans’ Voodoo community is rebuilding

Last Friday marked the 9th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the natural disaster that killed almost 2,000 people and displaced 400,000 people, most of them low-income African-Americans and people of color. This tragedy left a hole in the city of New Orleans and exposed the legacy of our country’s at times sickening racism, hurting diverse and rich communities that we rarely hear about in mainstream media.

One of those was the Voodoo or Vodou community. Before Hurricane Katrina hit, there were about 2,500 practitioners in New Orleans. Today, there are closer to 350. 

Last Friday marked the 9th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the natural disaster that killed almost 2,000 people and displaced 400,000 people, most of them low-income African-Americans and people of color. This tragedy left a hole in the ...

Load More