Posts Tagged queer

Fashion and Feminism: Mateo Guadalupe of Leather Coven

In an effort to further the dialogue on fashion, adornment, and feminism, we’re doing a series of interviews with feminist designers and artists who create beautiful things to wear. Check out our previous installment here!

Mateo Guadalupe is an activist, artist, and all-around magical person. Most importantly for today’s purposes, though, Mateo is an excellent leatherworker, making gorgeous, high-quality leather harnesses, bustiers, and other assorted leather creations that manage to both be unexpected (in the best way) and pay tribute to queer leather histories. A browse through his etsy shop, Leather Coven, will have you lusting after occasions to wear Beyonce-inspired leatherwear and regal leather crowns — and ...

In an effort to further the dialogue on fashion, adornment, and feminism, we’re doing a series of interviews with feminist designers and artists who create beautiful things to wear. Check out our previous installment ...

Feministing Jamz: The Afropunk Festival is doing it right

The Afropunk Festival is hands-down one of my favorite things about summer in New York City. Every year, at the end of August, there is a whole weekend full of amazing musicians, and this year’s lineup is super exciting. Even outside of the music, though, the Festival has managed to create a wonderful and accepting space for all sorts of folks in attendance, and particularly for queer folks of color.

The Afropunk Festival is hands-down one of my favorite things about summer in New York City. Every year, at the end of August, there is a whole weekend full of amazing musicians, and

In the Name of Our Humanity: The Failure of Tolerance for LGBTQ People

There’s been an instructive imbroglio flaring between a few men in the middle echelons of the American commentariat. The New York Times’ Ross Douthat wrote about the “terms of surrender” that he and other opponents of LGBT  marriage equality were currently negotiating against what he sees as gay rights’ relentless march, Slate’s Mark Joseph Stern forcefully declaims the dissembling disingenuousness inherent to the piece, and then a couple of other men from The Week have a go on the merry go round, with Michael Brendan Dougherty making a pluralist-inspired paean for “religious liberty,” and Damon Linker going further and asseverating that same sex marriage supporters are “the real bigots” in this debate.

There’s been an instructive imbroglio flaring between a few men in the middle echelons of the American commentariat. The New York Times’ Ross Douthat wrote about the “terms of surrender” that he and other opponents ...

Feministing Jamz: Chatting with My Gay Banjo

I’m super excited to bring you Feministing Jamz’ first interview!

I first saw Julia and Owen play together as My Gay Banjo years ago in a Brooklyn living room, at some sort of potluck talent show combo where I forgot my umbrella (it was a good umbrella). Though the umbrella incident was kinda sad, I still remember that evening quite fondly, for these two totally captured my heart. Since then, this sweet duo has played countless shows, developed a loving audience, and is now on tour across the U.S. promoting their newest album, Country Boys in the City

I’m super excited to bring you Feministing Jamz’ first interview!

I first saw Julia and Owen play together as My Gay Banjo years ago in a Brooklyn living room, at some sort of potluck talent ...

The Academic Feminist: Finding Queer Feminist Community in Academia

Welcome back, Academic Feminists, I hope that your new year/new semester is off to a good start. Today’s column features a dialogue between John Jay College of Criminal Justice colleagues Marcie Bianco and Victoria Bond. Marcie Bianco, Queer Public(s) Intellectual, PhD, is a columnist and contributing writer at AfterEllen and Lambda Literary, as well as an adjunct associate professor at John Jay College at Hunter College. Victoria Bond is the co-author of Zora and Me and a lecturer at John Jay College. The two caught my eye when they teamed up on  AfterEllen to discuss Beyoncé’s latest album, which they analyzed using Audre Lorde’s “The Uses of Erotic” (!!). Their conversation today touches on everything ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists, I hope that your new year/new semester is off to a good start. Today’s column features a dialogue between John Jay College of Criminal Justice colleagues Marcie Bianco and Victoria Bond.

Weekly Feminist Reader

Women and leadership: “Too often mentors coach women on confidence and personality rather than business and financial ability.”

“When do I finally get to belong? On being both native and queer enough.”

Once again, Ta-Nehesi Coates inspires: “Here is the machinery of racism—the privilege of being oblivious to questions, of never having to grapple with what is around you.”

Rape, bribery and corruption in Kibera.

21,000 people were homeless in Chicago when it was -15 degrees this week.

China’s decision to relax its one-child-policy will curb the forced abortions but many Chinese aren’t going to rush to have more children.

Women and leadership: “Too often mentors coach women on confidence and personality rather than business and financial ability.”

“When do I finally get to belong? On being both native and queer enough.”

Once again, Ta-Nehesi ...

Weekly Feminist Reader

Madiba walks with us.

An in-depth look into one of Chicago’s thriving business markets: heroin.

The formidable Ta-Nehisi Coates on Alec Baldwin, language and bigotry.

Sorry Twitter, we’re not going to pat you on the back for appointing ONE woman to your board.

Moms on wall-street, dads at home: marriages that experiment with the intersection of money, work, family, and power.

What isn’t there to love about Kristin Wiig

Madiba walks with us.

An in-depth look into one of Chicago’s thriving business markets: heroin.

The formidable Ta-Nehisi Coates on Alec Baldwin, language and bigotry.

Sorry Twitter, we’re not going to pat you ...

Dream 9 exposing horrifying conditions in immigration detention

Last week, the Dream 9 crossed the border from Mexico into the United States in broad daylight by a border patrol station in Nogales. Their intention was to infiltrate and organize the Eloy Detention Center in Arizona, as well as to petition to return to their longtime homes in the United States on the grounds of humanitarian parole.

The action has grown into a hunger strike to protest the conditions at Eloy, a detention center that removes more than 1,000 people from the United States daily. The activists claim that their phone use was unfairly restricted and six were placed in solitary confinement. As of yesterday morning, two of these activists have been in complete isolation for over ...

Last week, the Dream 9 crossed the border from Mexico into the United States in broad daylight by a border patrol station in Nogales. Their intention was to infiltrate and organize the Eloy Detention Center in ...

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