Posts Tagged poetry

Feministing Readz: Dorothea Lasky’s Rome

These days, it seems like wound talk is everywhere. Throughout the blogosphere, feminist writers have explosively reopened public discussions of how to articulate and theorize their pain. In April, Leslie Jamison sketched an expansive topography of wounded women of poetry and prose, challenging the frequent dismissal of female pain as condescendingly lumped into the genre of “confessional.”

Though Jamison’s essay was a viral sensation upon its release, she is not the first writer to grapple publicly with the problem of writing woundedness and womanhood. As early as the 1970s, Toi Derricotte confronted the belittlement of her candid poems on black identity as a reaction against “what is real and what people do not want to hear.” Beginning with Emily Dickinson, spanning ...

These days, it seems like wound talk is everywhere. Throughout the blogosphere, feminist writers have explosively reopened public discussions of how to articulate and theorize their pain. In April, Leslie Jamison sketched an expansive topography of wounded ...

Feministing Readz: Insel

You could probably count on one hand the number of novels that have taken up great platonic male-female friendships as their theme. The republication of Mina Loy’s Insel, by Melville House Publishing’s Neversink Library this past May, is a refreshing, challenging, and brilliant addition to this intimate pantheon.

Loy’s only novel, Insel is the portrait of a starving German surrealist, as told by his patron and friend, Mrs. Jones. Mrs. Jones is the quasi-fictional avatar of Loy herself; Insel, a loose construction drawn from Loy’s strange and euphoric friendship with the German painter Richard Oelze.

A luminary of transatlantic modernisms, Mina Loy worked across as many media as she did cities. Her itinerant artistic career occupied the capitals of the turn ...

You could probably count on one hand the number of novels that have taken up great platonic male-female friendships as their theme. The republication of Mina Loy’s Insel, by Melville House Publishing’s Neversink Library this past ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New Yorker and square Slate reviews, and an article in The Toast on the unsubtle heterosexism of said all male-authored reviews. Even after reading the book twice in private, it was difficult to experience her work separate from its online reception.

Perhaps this is fitting. Lockwood is arguably most well-known for her poem “Rape Joke,” which traveled meme-like across the web last year like no poem ever has, and anticipated its own hype: “The rape joke is if you write a poem called ...

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New ...

Poet puts the spotlight on gender, domestic violence, and colorism in new performance project

The Poetic License Theater Festival is currently underway in New York City. The ten-day festival will feature performances and readings from such luminaries as Ntozake Shange and Staceyann Chin. It will also feature a three-day run of the multidisciplinary production Redbone: A Biomythography , written and performed by poet Mahogany L. Browne, beginning this Monday at the Wild Theater Project in New York City. 

The Poetic License Theater Festival is currently underway in New York City. The ten-day festival will feature performances and readings from such luminaries as Ntozake Shange and Staceyann Chin. It will also feature ...

Feministing Follow Friday: Feminist Poets Edition, Vol. II

A million years ago — OK, more like a month ago — before Feministing took time off for the holidays, and before I briefly left the blogosphere to study for finals, we put together Volume I of feminist poets you should follow on Twitter. As promised, just a bit late, here’s Volume II.

A million years ago — OK, more like a month ago — before Feministing took time off for the holidays, and before I briefly left the blogosphere to study for finals, we put together

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