Posts Tagged Muslim women

Photo Essay: Malaysian Muslim women with and without their hijabs

In my *spare* time (LOL), I edit the online literary magazine Union Station, which features fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and photo essays from emerging artists. One of my favorite essays is this one featuring Malaysian Muslim women with and without their hijabs by photographer Francisco Guerrero that we published in 2011. 

In my *spare* time (LOL), I edit the online literary magazine Union Station, which features fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and photo essays from emerging artists. One of my favorite essays is this one featuring Malaysian Muslim women ...

European Court upholds France’s veil ban because covered faces make people uncomfortable

In a surprisingly honest but disturbing decision, the European Court of Human Rights upheld France’s ban on the full-faced veil because veiling makes people uncomfortable.

S.A.S. is a 24-year-old French Muslim woman who wears a full-faced veil or niqab. She challenged the 2010 French law–which we’ve covered before–that bans wearing clothing that covers the face in public and imposes a fine of 150-euro ($205) and/or citizenship instruction. The ban, S.A.S. argued before the European Court of Human Rights, violates the European Convention on Human Rights, specifically the freedom of thought, conscience, and religion, and the prohibition of discrimination. The Court, however, disagreed and upheld the ban in a decision that cannot be appealed.

In a surprisingly honest but disturbing decision, the European Court of Human Rights upheld France’s ban on the full-faced veil because veiling makes people uncomfortable.

S.A.S. is a 24-year-old French Muslim woman who wears a full-faced veil ...

Girls soccer team in Colorado wears hijabs in solidarity with Muslim teammate

How great is this? At a recent match, referees told Samah Aida, a high school soccer player in Colorado, that she wasn’t allowed to wear her hijab on the field. The refs claimed that it posed a safety risk — not actually true according to soccer’s governing body FIFA, which recently lifted their ban on religious head coverings. 

How great is this? At a recent match, referees told Samah Aida, a high school soccer player in Colorado, that she wasn’t allowed to wear her hijab on the field. The refs claimed that it ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Do Muslim Women Need Saving?

Do Muslim women need saving? Lila Abu-Lughod’s question challenges what has become, in her words, the “new common sense”: a “moral mainstreaming of global women’s rights” that urges Westerners to intervene on behalf of faraway women held hostage by “backwards” religious beliefs. As feminists, we might see reason to celebrate a global, energized focus on gender. But Abu-Lughod argues persuasively that we have to approach these appeals with caution. Her analysis upsets not only wrong-headed ideas about the “Muslim women” we seek to save, but also fantasies of freedom and consent that form the basis of Western feminism.

Do Muslim women need saving? Lila Abu-Lughod’s question challenges what has become, in her words, the “new common sense”: a “moral mainstreaming of global women’s rights” that urges Westerners to intervene on behalf of faraway women ...

Quote of the Day: Malala calls out President Obama on drone strikes

Though she didn’t win the Nobel Peace prize, Malala Yousafzai did get a meeting with the Obamas last week, and she didn’t shy away from criticizing US drone policy. She recalled,

“I thanked President Obama for the United States’ work in supporting education in Pakistan and Afghanistan and for Syrian refugees. I also expressed my concerns that drone attacks are fueling terrorism. Innocent victims are killed in these acts, and they lead to resentment among the Pakistani people. If we refocus efforts on education it will make a big impact.”

As Omid Safi points out this post at Religion News Service, Malala, like so many Muslim reformers and other activists in ...

Though she didn’t win the Nobel Peace prize, Malala Yousafzai did get a meeting with the Obamas last week, and she didn’t shy away from criticizing US drone ...

Student journalist describes being sexually assaulted by mob in Egypt

*Trigger warning*

Another horrifying sexual assault against a woman journalist in Egypt is spotlighting the epidemic of harassment in the country–as well as the risks lady reporters regularly face across the globe. The attack against Natasha Smith, a British student journalist working on a documentary about women’s rights, during the post-election celebrations this past weekend closely echoes the attacks on Lara Logan and Mona Eltahawy last year.

She described the whole experience on her blog:

But in a split second, everything changed. Men had been groping me for a while, but suddenly, something shifted. I found myself being dragged from my male friend, groped all over, with increasing force and aggression. I screamed. I could see what was happening ...

*Trigger warning*

Another horrifying sexual assault against a woman journalist in Egypt is spotlighting the epidemic of harassment in the country–as well as the risks lady reporters regularly face across the globe. The attack against Natasha Smith, ...

FIFA takes first step towards lifting hijab ban for Muslim women soccer players

File this one as a win!

Muslim female soccer players are celebrating a decision by the International Football Association Board to allow them to test specially designed head coverings for four months.

Soccer’s international governing body, known as FIFA, has prohibited headscarves since 2007, citing safety concerns. The new headscarves will be fastened with Velcro rather than pins.

As you may remember, thanks to the ban on veiling, Iran’s women’s soccer team was effectively banned from participating in the next Olympics. That prompted Jordan’s Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein, who is a vice president of FIFA, to start pushing for change. A Dutch design successfully convinced FIFA that safety was not an issue.

I’m thrilled to see that there’s one ...

File this one as a win!

Muslim female soccer players are celebrating a decision by the International Football Association Board to allow them to test specially designed head coverings for four months.

Soccer’s international governing body, known ...