Posts Tagged media representation

Maggie Gyllenhaal accepting Golden Globe

Maggie Gyllenhaal celebrates more roles for “actual women” in Hollywood

Accepting the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Miniseries for her role in The Honorable Woman last night, Maggie Gyllenhaal took the opportunity to reject the focus in Hollywood on “powerful” female characters — and instead celebrated the increasing number of roles for actual women. 

Accepting the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Miniseries for her role in The Honorable Woman last night, Maggie Gyllenhaal took the opportunity to reject the focus in Hollywood on “powerful” female characters — and instead celebrated the increasing number ...

GLAAD gives two major movie studios failing grades for LGBT representation

GLAAD has released their second annual studio responsibility index, which tracks LGBT representation in major Hollywood films. Like last year, the report found a lack of LGBT representation in movies; additionally, a lot of the representation was negative:

GLAAD has released their second annual studio responsibility index, which tracks LGBT representation in major Hollywood films. Like last year, the report found a lack of LGBT representation in movies; additionally, a lot of the ...

Guest post: From obits to statues to traffic circles, whither the women?

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Soraya Chemaly. Soraya is a media critic and activist whose work focuses on women’s rights, free speech and the role of gender in politics, religion and popular culture.

Last week, irked after counting up The New York Time’s last 66 obits and finding that only seven were of women, poet Lynn Melnick tweeted the count, pointing out the imbalance to @NYTimesObituary. @NYTimesObituary, a parody account, responded with deadpan explanations, such as “After careful consideration, we believe that women have a tendency of dying less often.”  Their conversation continued the next morning, which is when I joined them, totally taken in, to ask how “notable,” and “significant” were defined. Despite repeating some ...

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Soraya Chemaly. Soraya is a media critic and activist whose work focuses on women’s rights, free speech and the role of gender in politics, religion and popular culture.

Last week, irked ...

TIME’s Person of the Year reminds us that women don’t matter

TIME Magazine announced its shortlist for Person of the Year today. Fun fact: since TIME started Man of the Year in 1927  (they un-gendered the title in 1999, only 24 years after they dubbed “American Women” Man of the Year), only four individual women have won the title, two of them women of colour.

FOUR. Which makes sense, because it’s not as though women do much, let alone “the most” to ever “influence the events of the year.” Who, us? We’re too busy making Pinterest boards and doing pilates to influence anything. Someone pass the top coat, please. 

TIME Magazine announced its shortlist for Person of the Year today. Fun fact: since TIME started Man of the Year in 1927  (they un-gendered the title in 1999, only 24 ...

Shadows of women

The perils of representing rape

Last week, Rehtaeh Parsons died from injuries sustained when she hanged herself in her bathroom. A year and a half earlier she had been gang-raped, images from the assault had been circulated, and she’d been ceaselessly harassed. A few days later the police arrested three teens for raping and then distributing photos of Audrie Pott, who had since killed herself.

These stories received significant media attention, as they should have. Newspapers tried to reconstruct the chain of events of the individual cases while columnists diagnosed the underlying societal problems that lead to such tragedies. I wrote a piece urging Feministing readers to combat rape culture in Parsons’ memory.

I had a lurking worry as I wrote, though, which has mushroomed ...

Last week, Rehtaeh Parsons died from injuries sustained when she hanged herself in her bathroom. A year and a half earlier she had been gang-raped, images from the assault had been circulated, and she’d been ceaselessly ...

The Associated Press drops “illegal” from immigrant

In a stunning victory for immigration advocates, the Associated Press Stylebook, the bible of grammar and style for journalists in the U.S., will no longer describe people who live in a country illegally as “illegal immigrants.” The reasoning is one that activists have been making for years, with campaigns such as “Drop the I-Word”: People are not illegal. Actions are.

Kathleen Carroll, senior vice president and executive editor of the stylebook, described the organization’s reasons in a blog post yesterday:

The Stylebook no longer sanctions the term “illegal immigrant” or the use of “illegal” to describe a person. Instead, it tells users that “illegal” should describe only an action, such as living in or immigrating ...

In a stunning victory for immigration advocates, the Associated Press Stylebook, the bible of grammar and style for journalists in the U.S., will no longer describe people who live in a country illegally as ...

This week in race and technology: My daughter’s face is 97% Korean!

A few weeks ago, Jamelle Bouie wrote a story for The Magazine about the lack of racial diversity in Silicon Valley, and the media that cover it.

One excerpt:

[I]t’s important to recognize the barriers to entry that exist in [technology media], or put differently, the ways in which the obvious path doesn’t always work for people of color. To start, many writers of color lack an insider connection: They don’t necessarily have the social status or networks needed to break into tech journalism.

And despite the dominance of tech reporting and gadgets sites, there are relatively few tenable staff jobs or full-time freelancers working in the field — perhaps no more than a few thousand, if that, in the United States. Thus ...

A few weeks ago, Jamelle Bouie wrote a story for The Magazine about the lack of racial diversity in Silicon Valley, and the media that cover it.

One excerpt:

[I]t’s important to recognize the barriers to entry that exist ...

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