Posts Tagged literature

The Academic Feminist: Koritha Mitchell on lynching, LGBT violence, and love

Welcome back, Academic Feminists. This month’s edition features Koritha Mitchell,
Associate Professor of English at The Ohio State University. Her research, which is focused on African-American literature, racial violence, and black drama and performance, has been supported by the Ford Foundation and the American Association of University Women (AAUW). Here, Koritha discusses her award-winning book,
Living with Lynching, and her more recent work “Love in Action,” which draws connections between the underlying causes of lynching and contemporary violence against LGBT communities.  Along the way, she shares some of her feminist inspirations and important insights on self-care. You can find out more about Koritha’s work on her blog Kori’s Commentary  and her blog about her book Living ...

Welcome back, Academic Feminists. This month’s edition features Koritha Mitchell,
Associate Professor of English at The Ohio State University. Her research, which is focused on African-American literature, racial violence, and black drama and performance, has ...

Coverflip challenge reimagines famous dude book covers as by and for women

Yesterday author Maureen Johnson, fed up with sexist responses to the perceived gender appeal of her books covers, issued a challenge to her followers. She writes:

You are informed about a book’s perceived quality through a number of ways. Probably the biggest is the cover….

And the simple fact of the matter is, if you are a female author, you are much more likely to get the package that suggests the book is of a lower perceived quality. Because it’s “girly,” which is somehow inherently different and easier on the palate. A man and a woman can write books about the same subject matter, at the same level of quality, and that woman is simple more likely ...

Yesterday author Maureen Johnson, fed up with sexist responses to the perceived gender appeal of her books covers, issued a challenge to her followers. She writes:

You are informed about a book’s perceived quality through ...

Quote of the Day: “People only say I’m angry because I’m black and I’m a woman.”

Novelist Jamaica Kincaid offers some #realtalk in response to a question about the role of anger and humor in her writing in a recent interview at The American Reader.

People only say I’m angry because I’m black and I’m a woman. But all sorts of people write with strong feeling, the way I do. But if they’re white, they won’t say it. I used to just pretend I didn’t notice it, and now I just think I don’t care.

There are all sorts of reasons not to like my writing. But that’s not one of them. Saying something is angry is not a criticism. It’s not valid. It’s not a valid observation in terms of criticism. You can list ...

Novelist Jamaica Kincaid offers some #realtalk in response to a question about the role of anger and humor in her writing in a recent interview at The American Reader.

People only say I’m angry because ...

Happy 200th anniversary, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen’s famous novel Pride and Prejudice was first published on January 28th, 1812, 200 years ago today. While Austen’s work isn’t exactly an experiment in radical intersectional rebellion, she was a proto-feminist thinker who created independently-minded female characters, identified obstacles that kept other women from writing, and paved the way for female writers after her. If you’re a fan looking to celebrate with like-minded readers, or just gawk at all the fuss, you’ve got some options:

Fight your way into a reconstruction of the Netherfield Ball hosted by the BBC. Or, more realistically, spend the day figuring out how to get BBC2 by the time a program based on the event airs in the spring. Explore the feminist literature ...

Jane Austen’s famous novel Pride and Prejudice was first published on January 28th, 1812, 200 years ago today. While Austen’s work isn’t exactly an experiment in radical intersectional rebellion, she was a proto-feminist thinker who created independently-minded ...

Louise Erdrich becomes first American Indian woman to win National Book Award

Erdrich’s book, The Round House, is about violence against American Indian women, and about one young man who confronts that violence when it finds its way into his home.

According to CBS News,

A clearly delighted and surprised Erdrich, who’s part Ojibwe, spoke in her tribal tongue and then switched to English as she dedicated her fiction award to “the grace and endurance of native women.”

Only fifteen or so women have won the adult fiction prize since 1952, and Erdrich is the first American Indian woman to ever win it. “This is a book about a huge case of injustice ongoing on reservations,” she said. “Thank you for giving it a wider audience.”

When the short list was ...

Erdrich’s book, The Round House, is about violence against American Indian women, and about one young man who confronts that violence when it finds its way into his home.

According to CBS News,

A clearly ...

Publishing’s perpetual problem with women among many other things.

In the wake of the Jonah Lehrer controversy, Roxanne Gay wonders if  the publishing industry coddles young male writers and unpacks the fascination with our boy genius narrative:

Lehrer’s success and this current humiliation, how far he had to fall, is a symptom of a much bigger problem, one that is systemic, one that continues to consistently elevate certain kinds of men simply for being a certain kind of man. Jonah Lehrer fits the narrative we want about a boy genius. He is young, attractive and well educated. He can write a good sentence. He can parse complicated science for the masses and make us feel smarter for finally being able to understand the complexities of the human mind. He is ...

In the wake of the Jonah Lehrer controversy, Roxanne Gay wonders if  the publishing industry coddles young male writers and unpacks the fascination with our boy genius narrative:

Lehrer’s success and this current humiliation, how far he had ...

Gatsby. What Gatsby?

I don’t know about you, but I’m really feeling this trailer. Baz Lurhmann’s signature penchant for assigning an anachronistic soundscape to re-imagined and vividly colorful fictional histories had me at beat drop from Jay and Ye’s No Church in The Wild.  That track is perfect for setting the tone for the uninitiated; a dark and sexy accompaniment to what —we who never lived through the decadent bacchanal— known as the Jazz Age.  More than anything, it made me want to re-read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece. It was my summer reading from 2002, a quiet book about a society’s unraveling at the height of wealth and opulence, a post war America lumbering its way into modern age. I never had to read The Great Gatsby in ...

I don’t know about you, but I’m really feeling this trailer. Baz Lurhmann’s signature penchant for assigning an anachronistic soundscape to re-imagined and vividly colorful fictional histories had me at beat drop from Jay and Ye’s No Church ...

And the Hey, Boo tickets go to…

Caterina Gironda, who sent in this lovely poem:

I want to tell you that I am woman,
Because I feel my womb swell once a month,
And bleed with the promise to produce a new life.
I want to tell you that I am woman,
Because I recall when my hymen bled like a head wound
with the first thrust of a man.
But I am sorry, Ms. Steinem,
I no longer know what woman and man even means.
I no longer know what brings us together and who we feminist against.
I no longer can shelter us under one umbrella,
Can find a rallying cry to bring us out to march,
Can glance in solidarity at a sister survivor.
For ...

Caterina Gironda, who sent in this lovely poem:

I want to tell you that I am woman,
Because I feel my womb swell once a month,
And bleed with the promise to produce a new life.
I want ...

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