Posts Tagged literature

little labors

Feministing Reads: Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors

Before Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors (May 2016, New Directions), I had never read a book explicitly about babies and literature. I soon learned that this was likely because babies have historically occupied a marginal place in most books—and in most art generally.

Before Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors (May 2016, New Directions), I had never read a book explicitly about babies and literature. I soon learned that this was likely because babies have historically occupied a marginal place in most ...

560564_10150879190451127_117434014_n

Feministing Five: Writer Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo on closing the literary byline gap

Back in 2011, a group of writers who were frustrated with underrepresentation of women in literature gathered in writer Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo‘s mother’s kitchen. They founded “Women Who Submit,” a physical and online community that encourages women writers to submit to literary publications. For this week’s Feministing Five, we spoke with Bermejo to learn about how submitting lit has profound implications.

Back in 2011, a group of writers who were frustrated with underrepresentation of women in literature gathered in writer Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo‘s mother’s kitchen. They founded “Women Who Submit,” a physical and online community ...

Jonathan Franzen

Jonathan Franzen and the privilege of technophobia

Ed. note: This post was originally published on the Community site.

“Jonathan Franzen is Having More Fun Than His Critics,” reads the headline of Laura Miller’s rave review of the author’s latest tome, Purity.

Ed. note: This post was originally published on the Community site.

“Jonathan Franzen is Having More Fun Than His Critics,” reads the headline of Laura Miller’s rave review of the author’s ...

Feministing Readz: Looking for home in ire’ne lara silva’s flesh to bone

I’m not sure about your social media, but mine lately’s been blowing up with people talking about just how much their hometown they are. People on my feeds are so Chicago. They’re so Wingate, NC, they’re so Worcester, MA, and they’re so New York City. They’re dropping names of old hangouts and neighborhood characters. As an immigrant girl, I happen to have thought quite a bit about home. But am I so my hometown? Nah. In fact, I’m so immigrant that when I go back to the place I’m from I’m a gringa, although here I’ll never really be American. I’m so immigrant that I feel the absence of so much knowledge about my home like an ache on a ...

I’m not sure about your social media, but mine lately’s been blowing up with people talking about just how much their hometown they are. People on my feeds are so Chicago. They’re so Wingate, NC, they’re ...

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Our Dangerous Ideology: Insurgent Literature on Activism

We, especially those of us in feminist movements, seem to relive the wracking debates of our movement’s past lives, and as people of colour in particular we seem condemned at times to a Groundhog Day of vexatious, soul-wrenching debates about our role in not just activism, but life itself. Are we selling out if we [insert anything slightly fun or remunerative here]? What does it mean to be authentically [insert ethnicity/race here]? The radical wing of activism presents one with equal dilemmas about living one’s values. “Be the change you want to see in the world,” and a dozen other tiresome clichés that have been reincarnated as inspirational Facebook memes. But all these swarms of corkscrewing questions pale before the ...

We, especially those of us in feminist movements, seem to relive the wracking debates of our movement’s past lives, and as people of colour in particular we seem condemned at times to a Groundhog Day of vexatious, ...

Load More